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Trade Relations Between Colombia and the United States
     

Trade Relations Between Colombia and the United States

by Jeffrey J. Schott (Editor)
 

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This volume analyzes the economic effects of a prospective free trade agreement between the United States and Colombia. The study uses the Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) model of world trade and economic activity to analyze the expected trade and other economic impacts of the prospective FTA and to examine bilateral trade and investment flows, bilateral trade

Overview

This volume analyzes the economic effects of a prospective free trade agreement between the United States and Colombia. The study uses the Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) model of world trade and economic activity to analyze the expected trade and other economic impacts of the prospective FTA and to examine bilateral trade and investment flows, bilateral trade frictions, and implications of the prospective accords for the bilateral, regional, and global trade relations of the two countries.

Editorial Reviews

Foreign Affairs
With global trade talks moribund, trade negotiators worldwideare turning their attention to bilateral and regional free-trade agreements. This latest Institute for International Economics offering intelligently and thoroughly assesses a next step in Western Hemisphere free-trade agreements, following on NAFTA and the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA): the U.S.-Colombian agreement that has been negotiated but not yet ratified by the respective legislatures. Schott correctly argues that although U.S. exporters and investors will benefit, the driving U.S. interests are broader: to catalyze further pro-competitiveness reforms and democratic prosperity in Colombia and to cement bilateral political relations. But will congressional Democrats use their new powers to block trade liberalization with developing economies? Kimberly Ann Elliott notes that Colombia has ratified many more international labor conventions than has the United States and that Colombia's labor laws are not far from international norms; of relevance, the bloody antiunion violence that plagues Colombia is mostly against public-service employees, not generally related to trade. Searching for a pragmatic bipartisan compromise, Elliott suggests further judicial reforms in Colombia and U.S. funding for capacity-building programs and labor-standard monitoring and enforcement.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780881323894
Publisher:
Peterson Institute for International Economics
Publication date:
08/28/2006
Series:
Policy Analyses in International Economics Ser.
Pages:
205
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Jeffrey J. Schott joined the Peterson Institute for International Economics in 1983 and is a senior fellow working on international trade policy and economic sanctions. Durgaing his tenure at the Institute, Schott was also a visiting lecturer at Princeton University (1994) and an adjunct professor at Georgetown University (1986–88). He was a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (1982–83) and an official of the US Treasury Department (1974–82) in international trade and energy policy. Durgaing the Tokyo Round of multilateral trade negotiations, he was a member of the US delegation that negotiated the GATT Subsidies Code. Since January 2003, he has been a member of the Trade and Environment Policy Advisory Committee of the US government. He is also a member of the State Department's Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy.

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