Trading Bases: How a Wall Street Trader Made a Fortune Betting on Baseball

Trading Bases: How a Wall Street Trader Made a Fortune Betting on Baseball

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by Joe Peta
     
 

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An ex–Wall Street trader improved on Moneyball’s famed sabermetrics and beat the Vegas odds with his own betting methods. Here is the story of how Joe Peta turned fantasy baseball into a dream come true.
 
Joe Peta turned his back on his Wall Street trading career to pursue an ingenious—and incredibly risky—dream

Overview

An ex–Wall Street trader improved on Moneyball’s famed sabermetrics and beat the Vegas odds with his own betting methods. Here is the story of how Joe Peta turned fantasy baseball into a dream come true.
 
Joe Peta turned his back on his Wall Street trading career to pursue an ingenious—and incredibly risky—dream. He would apply his risk-analysis skills to Major League Baseball, and treat the sport like the S&P 500.
 
In Trading Bases, Peta takes us on his journey from the ballpark in San Francisco to the trading floors and baseball bars of New York and the sportsbooks of Las Vegas, telling the story of how he created a baseball “hedge fund” with an astounding 41 percent return in his first year. And he explains the unique methods he developed.
 
Along the way, Peta provides insight into the Wall Street crisis he managed to escape: the fragility of the midnineties investment model; the disgraced former CEO of Lehman Brothers, who recruited Peta; and the high-adrenaline atmosphere where million-dollar sports-betting pools were common.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Fascinating…reads like a mash up of Liar’s Poker and Moneyball.”—Publishers Weekly

“[A] swaggering story from frantic stock trader to professional sports bettor....Even casual baseball fans could learn from it. Serious fans should slurp it up like ballpark beer.”—Los Angeles Times
 
“He reminds me of Nate Silver—he’s able to blend different worlds (in this case, baseball and finance) using his intense knowledge of each to give us a very entertaining read.”—Play-by-Play Announcer for the San Francisco Giants and ESPN National Sportscaster Dave Flemming

“Peta created a reliable system for beating Vegas odds throughout the 2011 Major League season…but it’s clear he loves the game as much as the winnings. Moreover, he asks a number of salient questions, such as: How can businesses on Wall Street and beyond apply thinking used by baseball sabermetricians to strengthen their own organizations? The answers, and how Peta arrived at them, make for great reading.”—Booklist
 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101609651
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/07/2013
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
349,529
File size:
2 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
“Fascinating…reads like a mash up of Liar’s Poker and Moneyball.”—Publishers Weekly

“[A] swaggering story from frantic stock trader to professional sports bettor....Even casual baseball fans could learn from it. Serious fans should slurp it up like ballpark beer.”—Los Angeles Times
 
“He reminds me of Nate Silver—he’s able to blend different worlds (in this case, baseball and finance) using his intense knowledge of each to give us a very entertaining read.”—Play-by-Play Announcer for the San Francisco Giants and ESPN National Sportscaster Dave Flemming

“Peta created a reliable system for beating Vegas odds throughout the 2011 Major League season…but it’s clear he loves the game as much as the winnings. Moreover, he asks a number of salient questions, such as: How can businesses on Wall Street and beyond apply thinking used by baseball sabermetricians to strengthen their own organizations? The answers, and how Peta arrived at them, make for great reading.”—Booklist
 

Meet the Author

After earning an MBA from Stanford’s Graduate School of Business, Joe Peta was a Wall Street market maker and hedge fund stock trader for fifteen years, but he was a sports bettor for even longer. A lifelong baseball fan, he lives in San Francisco with his wife and two daughters.

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Trading Bases: A Story about Wall Street, Gambling, and Baseball (Not Necessarily in That Order) 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A book with rare insight, yet entertaining at the same time.  The book was recommended to me by a friend who does not follow baseball and now I see why. It's about much more than baseball.  The author's front row view of Lehman's collapse might be the best, most understandable account  of the financial  crisis I've read. Mixed in with the Wall Street scenes and the baseball betting (connected more easily than you might think) are some great family stories about baseball. It's a really great effort from someone I would bet we'll hear more of in the future.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Further proof that sports betting should be used to teach statistics... Great insight and analysis as to how an edge can be found just about anywhere. The authors critique of the Lehman Brothers demise was spot on and great to read an insiders account of events. His ability to weave together his personal story with insights into the gambling world made this a quick and easy read and I've already started using some of his modeling techniques for my own purposes. I'm not sure what the other reviewer was expecting, maybe a how-to-model, but what savvy investor/gambler would ever spell that out? Do some research/leg work / homework, don't expect to pick up a book and be handed a golden goose without doing any work. Its a great book for business and any sports lover, especially if you're a baseball stat-head.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Title should be I won money betting baseball but i'm not going to say how! Author constantly refers to his "model" in making selections but never tells you how model was created or stats used. Pre-ordered and wasted my money. Where is B&N truth in advertising Tom C. March, 2013