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Trading With The Enemy
     

Trading With The Enemy

4.0 2
by Charles Higham
 

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This perennial classic of political literature remians the only book to documnet the trading of the American financial establishment with Hitler's Germany in World War II, from Pearl Harbor to V-E Day. Ford supplied tanks to Hitler, the Chase Bank financed the Nazi's in Paris, ITT built rocket bombs for Goering and Standard Oil fueled U-boats in the Atlantic.

Overview

This perennial classic of political literature remians the only book to documnet the trading of the American financial establishment with Hitler's Germany in World War II, from Pearl Harbor to V-E Day. Ford supplied tanks to Hitler, the Chase Bank financed the Nazi's in Paris, ITT built rocket bombs for Goering and Standard Oil fueled U-boats in the Atlantic.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780595431663
Publisher:
iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date:
03/21/2007
Edition description:
Backinprint.com Edition
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
587,555
Product dimensions:
8.90(w) x 6.00(h) x 0.90(d)

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Trading with the Enemy 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Charles Higham's Trading With the Enemy is a fascinating and provocative work that concerns itself with the extent to which international corporations may have compromised American decision making prior to and during the second world war. Typically, books of this nature focus on one particular company or upon particular sectors of business. What this book purports to do is far more general and sweeping, treating the entire range of corporate interests as one monolithic tableau. In fact, twentieth century corporations putting their own interest before the interests of the nation was nothing new. The sort of non-national behavior depicted generally by Higham was very much in evidence by particular corporations before and during the first world war. Moreover, the innovation of banking institutions cloaked with the veil of neutrality that specialized in securing international assets during wartime also dates back to before the first world war. The seminal work for this body of literature is perhaps Lefebvre's Riddle of the Rheine. As adjuncts to advanced economic maturation, these and other financial innovations were arguably necessary to consolidation of the coal tar industry. And ironically the duty of directors to shareholders in most countries including our own would seem to mandate such practice. This would be particularly evident amongst corporations associated with the coal tar industry. They pioneered today's horror of 'outsourcing'. Although Higham's book appears to be as authoritative as it is provocative, it is in fact deficient in two very substantial ways. First, Higham's book reveals an interest in the provocative that far surpasses any pretence to historical balance. If Higham had devoted his life to the historical study of this area a far different book would have emerged. One might argue that the weight of mastery and resultant authority often obscures truth. And there is something to be said for liberating the truth. On the other hand, the truth can't always be liberated and to some extent the author needs to strike some distance from interpretation and let at least some of the 'truth' speak for itself. When this is not done the result too often is work that fails to rise above 'tell all'. In addition, there are instances of factual inaccuracy. For example, when Higham mentions that Naval Secretay, James V. Forrestal, was a board member of an I.G. Farben subsidiary here in the United States, he speaks in error. The James Forrestal that served as an officer and director at GAF and AGFA was not the same man who served as naval secretary. In making this sort of common mistake, Higham reveals his instinct for 'tell all' as eclipsing the sort of mature and disciplined judgement one might expect from a literary venture of this magnitude. Nevertheless, the book still stands as a bold attempt at synthesizing something that Americans are too conveniently unaware of.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Far more incredible than Higham's expose on American Nazi trade is the total,incomprehensible extermination of the book itself. No mainstream literary publication such as the New Yorker, Harper's, Atlantic Monthly, or the New York Times review of Books has breathed a word of it. The only reviews I've found are in 2 obscure library journals and one religious publication. Why has there been no mention of the American-Nazi collusion by those wanting to build a WWII monument in Washington? At least the profiteering American companies could pay for that. In all the talk of reparations for the victims of the holacaust by Swiss Banks, why hasn't there been equivalent attention given to reparations for WWII vets and their families? It's an outrage. I'm not a great conspiracy theorist but if ever something smelled rotten in the state of Denmark, this is IT