Traditional Construction Patterns: Design and Detail Rules-of-Thumb / Edition 1

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Overview

"Steve Mouzon ... has produced a manual that is clear, easy to use, and targeted to the most common errors ... Traditional architects can now sweep their own house clean." -- Andres Duany, Architect & Planner

Looking at a building and seeing a building are two very different things. To truly understand traditional architecture you must train your eye to see the difference between the Dos and Don'ts. Steve Mouzon's beautifully illustrated book provides an essential resource for anyone seeking this knowledge." -- Marianne Cusato, Author

"... to see a town or a building through the eyes of a gifted architect like Steve Mouzon is to truly experience it ... this book is an inspiration to building our world better again ..." -- Kristen Payne, Southern Living

...absolutely essential ... a new town or new neighborhood is simply more profitable when the architecture is correct ..." -- Nathan Norris, Developer

"... the first book in my library and the only book I take into the field ..." -- James B. Wagnon, Jr., Historical Home Crafters, Inc.

This book explains, in layman's terms, the vague sense of unease we've all had with traditional architecture done incorrectly for the past half-century, and provides the tools for doing it right again. The first tool is a fully illustrated Lexicon of nearly 240 terms we should all know, but probably don't. It's hard to ask for something if you don't know what to call it. It's also hard to say it if you don't know how to pronounce it, so the Lexicon provides pronunciation of all of the words that are not obvious.

The primary tool, however, is a collection of 108 patterns illustrated as Dos and Don'ts with diagrams and photographs. These patterns represent the most common errors of traditional construction, and are the things we really need to start getting right if we hope to build more of the most-loved places again.

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Editorial Reviews

Choice
"Putting the ideas of Modernism into the hands of average architects" and builders has resulted in "architecture done wrong for the past half-century." Architects Mouzon and Henderson explain their "sense of unease" and illustrate a range of do's and don'ts that "give people the tools for getting it right again." In 14 chapters they discuss architectural details ranging from the classical orders to roofs, site work, and signage. Powerful opening chapters set the stage by succinctly discussing architectural history, theory, themes and patterns. The Roman architect Vitruvius is cited, and his themes of commodity, firmness, and delight are expanded for application in reviving the lost language of architecture. The remaining eight chapters are clearly laid out with brief essays on architectural features; these are interspersed with excellent black-and-white photographs. All elements are examined using a technique incorporated into architecture: the transect, an organizing device for developing proper patterns. An illustrated lexicon is also included to educate laypersons in the language, but it is too detailed and selective to be as effective as desired. This is a great companion to Jonathan Hale's The Old Way of Seeing (1994) and the National Park Service's The Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation (rev., 1990). Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers: upper-division undergraduates through professionals; two-year technical program students. -- L.B. Sickels-Taves, Eastern Michigan University
Choice
"Putting the ideas of Modernism into the hands of average architects" and builders has resulted in "architecture done wrong for the past half-century." Architects Mouzon and Henderson explain their "sense of unease" and illustrate a range of do's and don'ts that "give people the tools for getting it right again." In 14 chapters they discuss architectural details ranging from the classical orders to roofs, site work, and signage. Powerful opening chapters set the stage by succinctly discussing architectural history, theory, themes and patterns. The Roman architect Vitruvius is cited, and his themes of commodity, firmness, and delight are expanded for application in reviving the lost language of architecture. The remaining eight chapters are clearly laid out with brief essays on architectural features; these are interspersed with excellent black-and-white photographs. All elements are examined using a technique incorporated into architecture: the transect, an organizing device for developing proper patterns. An illustrated lexicon is also included to educate laypersons in the language, but it is too detailed and selective to be as effective as desired. This is a great companion to Jonathan Hale's The Old Way of Seeing (1994) and the National Park Service's The Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation (rev., 1990). Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers: upper-division undergraduates through professionals; two-year technical program students. — L.B. Sickels-Taves, Eastern Michigan University
Choice

Putting the ideas of Modernism into the hands of average architects" and builders has resulted in "architecture done wrong for the past half-century." Architects Mouzon and Henderson explain their "sense of unease" and illustrate a range of do's and don'ts that "give people the tools for getting it right again. In 14 chapters they discuss architectural details ranging from the classical orders to roofs, site work, and signage. Powerful opening chapters set the stage by succinctly discussing architectural history, theory, themes and patterns. The Roman architect Vitruvius is cited, and his themes of commodity, firmness, and delight are expanded for application in reviving the lost language of architecture. The remaining eight chapters are clearly laid out with brief essays on architectural features; these are interspersed with excellent black-and-white photographs. All elements are examined using a technique incorporated into architecture: the transect, an organizing device for developing proper patterns. An illustrated lexicon is also included to educate laypersons in the language, but it is too detailed and selective to be as effective as desired. This is a great companion to Jonathan Hale's The Old Way of Seeing (1994) and the National Park Service's The Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation (rev., 1990). Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers: upper-division undergraduates through professionals; two-year technical program students. — L.B. Sickels-Taves, Eastern Michigan University

Choice
"Putting the ideas of Modernism into the hands of average architects" and builders has resulted in "architecture done wrong for the past half-century." Architects Mouzon and Henderson explain their "sense of unease" and illustrate a range of do's and don'ts that "give people the tools for getting it right again." In 14 chapters they discuss architectural details ranging from the classical orders to roofs, site work, and signage. Powerful opening chapters set the stage by succinctly discussing architectural history, theory, themes and patterns. The Roman architect Vitruvius is cited, and his themes of commodity, firmness, and delight are expanded for application in reviving the lost language of architecture. The remaining eight chapters are clearly laid out with brief essays on architectural features; these are interspersed with excellent black-and-white photographs. All elements are examined using a technique incorporated into architecture: the transect, an organizing device for developing proper patterns. An illustrated lexicon is also included to educate laypersons in the language, but it is too detailed and selective to be as effective as desired. This is a great companion to Jonathan Hale's The Old Way of Seeing (1994) and the National Park Service's The Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation (rev., 1990). Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers: upper-division undergraduates through professionals; two-year technical program students. -- L.B. Sickels-Taves, Eastern Michigan University
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780071416320
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing
  • Publication date: 9/20/2004
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 294
  • Sales rank: 751,315
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Stephen A. Mouzon and Susan M. Henderson are architects and town planners, and are principals of PlaceMakers, which is headquartered in Miami, Florida. Steve is a founder of the New Urban Guild. He has authored or contributed to a number of publications in recent years, including the Public Works Manual, Charles Barrett: The Architectural Drawings, Biltmore Estate Homes, and 1001 Traditional Construction Details. He continues to shoot the photographic Catalog of the Most-Loved Places, which currently includes over 25,000 digital images in 52 volumes. The PlaceMakers Pattern Books are currently the only Transect-based pattern books in existence and are meant to be companion pieces to this book.
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Table of Contents

Foreword
Ch. 1 The story of the languages of architecture
Ch. 2 Three great themes of traditional architecture
Ch. 3 Lexicon
Ch. 4 The classical orders
Ch. 5 Basic principles
Ch. 6 Details
Ch. 7 Walls
Ch. 8 Doors and windows
Ch. 9 Porches and balconies
Ch. 10 Eaves
Ch. 11 Roofs
Ch. 12 Dormers
Ch. 13 Attachments
Ch. 14 Sitework
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