Tragedy and Citizenship: Conflict, Reconciliation, and Democracy from Haemon to Hegel

Tragedy and Citizenship: Conflict, Reconciliation, and Democracy from Haemon to Hegel

by Derek W. M. Barker
     
 

Tragedy and Citizenship provides a wide-ranging exploration of attitudes toward tragedy and their implications for politics. Derek W. M. Barker reads the history of political thought as a contest between the tragic view of politics that accepts conflict and uncertainty, and an optimistic perspective that sees conflict as self-dissolving. Drawing on Aristotle's… See more details below

Overview

Tragedy and Citizenship provides a wide-ranging exploration of attitudes toward tragedy and their implications for politics. Derek W. M. Barker reads the history of political thought as a contest between the tragic view of politics that accepts conflict and uncertainty, and an optimistic perspective that sees conflict as self-dissolving. Drawing on Aristotle's political thought, alongside a novel reading of the Antigone that centers on Haemon, its most neglected character, Barker provides contemporary democratic theory with a theory of tragedy. He sees Hegel's philosophy of reconciliation as a critical turning point that results in the elimination of citizenship. By linking Hegel's failure to address the tragic dimensions of politics to Richard Rorty, John Rawls, and Judith Butler, Barker offers a major reassessment of contemporary political theory and a fresh perspective on the most urgent challenges facing democratic politics.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780791476291
Publisher:
State University of New York Press
Publication date:
11/06/2008
Pages:
198
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.80(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction Conflict, Reconciliation, and Citizenship 1

1 Listening to Haemon: Citizenship in the Antigone 19

2 Pity, Fear, and Citizenship: The Politics of Aristotle's Poetics 41

3 Hegel and the Politics of Reconciliation 69

4 Redescription as Reconciliation: Richard Rorty 87

5 John Rawls and Hegelian Political Philosophy 105

6 Judith Butler's Postmodern Antigone 119

Conclusion: Tragedy, Citizenship, and the Human Condition 139

Notes 151

Bibliography 173

Index 183

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