Train to Somewhere

( 4 )

Overview

In the late 1800s, Marianne travels westward on the Orphan Train in hopes of being placed with a caring family.

Based on the Orphan Trains what crisscrossed the United States from the 1850s to the 1920s, the latest collaboration between Eve Bunting and Ronald Himler tells the story of Marianne, who's sure that her mother will claim her somewhere on her way west. Full color.

In the late 1800s, ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$7.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (17) from $3.18   
  • New (8) from $3.99   
  • Used (9) from $3.18   
Train to Somewhere

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$6.99
BN.com price
(Save 12%)$7.99 List Price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

In the late 1800s, Marianne travels westward on the Orphan Train in hopes of being placed with a caring family.

Based on the Orphan Trains what crisscrossed the United States from the 1850s to the 1920s, the latest collaboration between Eve Bunting and Ronald Himler tells the story of Marianne, who's sure that her mother will claim her somewhere on her way west. Full color.

In the late 1800s, Marianne travels westward on the Orphan Train in hopes of being placed with a caring family.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Inspired by a little-known chapter of American history, this characteristically incisive collaboration from Bunting and Himler (Someday a Tree, see p. 90; Fly Away Home) imagines a journey on one of the many "Orphan Trains" that, between the mid-1850s and the late 1920s, brought children from New York City orphanages to adoptive families in the West. The narrator of this finely crafted, heart-wrenching story is Marianne, a plain girl secretly dreaming of being reunited with her own mother, who promised to return for Marianne after making a new life for them in the West. Bunting ably weaves the girl's hopes and anxieties into her perceptive account of how each of Marianne's 13 companions is chosen for adoption at the various train stations while she futilely searches the crowd for her mother. Finally only Marianne remains. In the tale's optimistic ending, Marianne finds a new family in Somewhere, Iowa, the train's last stop. Here an elderly couple, who clearly had planned on adopting a boy, take Marianne in, with ultimately comforting, resonant words: "Sometimes what you get turns out to be better than what you wanted in the first place." Himler's watercolor and gouache paintings offer polished portraits of the period as they convey the plot's considerable emotion. Like Bunting's text, his art is at once sobering and uplifting-and assuredly memorable. Ages 5-8. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
Eve Bunting has always been an author who sheds light on emotional issues. Recently she has turned her writing talents to historical subjects. Train to Somewhere illuminates the times of the Orphan Trains, which ran from the mid-1850's to 1920, bringing an estimated 100,000 homeless children by train from New York City to small towns and farms in the Midwest. Bunting's tale tells the story of Marianne, a young female orphan, traveling with thirteen others on an orphan train. Bunting's genius shows when she takes the general subject into the specific by showing us Marianne's hopes, dreams, and disappointment. Marianne's mother, leaving her at the orphanage, has promised she'd make a new life for them in the West, and return before Christmas, but Marianna has "waited through so many Christmases." Still she hopes to be greeted by her mother at every stop the train makes. Her journey, marred by rude comments and rejection, turns Marianne's dreams to disappointment. She is, finally, the last orphan, headed to the last stop, the town of Somewhere. The train is greeted by an elderly couple who'd hoped for a boy, but welcome her lovingly. The woman speaks of her happy late-in-life marriage, saying "sometimes what you get turns out to be better than what you wanted in the first place." Marianne's dreams of finding her mother begin to fade in her new hopes for a secure home with people who care about her.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-From the mid-19th century until after World War I, thousands of homeless "orphans" were sent West by charitable agencies to find homes with families seeking workers, children to adopt, or mother's helpers. In telling the story of one child, Bunting encapsulates the fears and sometimes happy endings of those fateful trips. Marianne is among the oldest and least attractive of the 14 children sent on a train to the Midwest, and she starts the journey with hopes that her mother will be waiting at one of the stops. At each station, papers are signed and children are placed, until only Marianne remains when the last town of Somewhere is reached. Only an elderly couple, hoping for a boy, is waiting there. They look kindly at Marianne, and the grandmotherly wife sums up the story's theme when she remarks that "Sometimes what you get turns out to be better than what you wanted in the first place." By making this slice of American history into an appealing tale, Bunting offers an opportunity to compare present-day social policies with those of times past. The book is timely yet universal in showing the desire of every child for a loving family. Himler's full-page, bordered paintings portray the people and towns in warm colors and softly blended brush strokes. Beyond this gentle story lie the social issues of our own day.-Shirley Wilton, Ocean County College, Toms River, NJ
Kirkus Reviews
A moving piece of Americana from a veteran team (Fly Away Home, 1992, etc.), introducing the orphan trains of the 19th and early 20th century to a picture-book audience. Marianne narrates; she's among 14 children from the orphanages and streets of New York City who are being shipped to the "New West" of Illinois and Iowa in search of good homes. At stop after stop her traveling mates are chosen, some clearly for their strength and usefulness, others for their looks. Marianne is neither strong nor pretty and is repeatedly passed over. Secretly she has promised herself that her mother would be at one of the stops to meet her. In the end she is taken in by a nice, elderly couple whom readers know will treat her well. Himler's lovely watercolor and gouache paintings express both the loneliness and hope of the children in scene after scene of the rugged new country. A reminder that the good old days were not so idyllic; this book will have a place in the history curriculum, but it's also an involving read-aloud.
From the Publisher
"A moving piece of Americana from a veteran team, introducing the orphan trains of the 19th and early 20th century to a picture-book audience. . . . A reminder that the good old days were not so idyllic; this book will have a place in the history curriculum, but it's also an involving read-aloud." Kirkus Reviews with Pointers

"The book is timely yet universal in showing the desire of every child for a loving family. Himler's full-page, bordered paintings portray the people and towns in warm colors and softly blended brush strokes. Beyond this gentle story lie the social issues of our own day." School Library Journal, Starred

"A heartbreaking picture book tells the story of the nineteenth-century Orphan Train in the voice of the plain girl nobody wants. Himler's beautiful, understated paintings show the train steaming across the prairie and the children trying to smile and look their best, hoping that someone will adopt them." Booklist, Editor's Choice

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780618040315
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 4/28/2000
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 86,176
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.25 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.13 (d)

Meet the Author

EVE BUNTING has written over two hundred books for children, including the Caldecott Medal-winning Smoky Night, illustrated by David Diaz. She lives in Southern California.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2012

    Love

    Its been theer years since i read this book for the first time amizaing i still rembered my class had to get tissuse for my teacher it truley teaches kids how fourchnet they r

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Great Historical Fiction for kids!!!

    I decided to order this book after reading other children's books by Eve Bunting. I am so glad that I did. This book is excellent. It tells about a girl going on the Orphan Train. Most of the children get chosen early until it is just the girl and the woman that works for the orphanage. It is a very touching story. It would be a great conversation starter to use in the classroom while learning about the time period. I am a studying to be a Elementary school teacher and I think that this is an excellent addition to my personal library.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)