Training in Management Skills / Edition 1

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Overview

  • Objectives
  • Self-Assessment Exercises (skill assessment)
  • Concepts
  • Concept Quiz
  • Observer's Rating Sheet (behavioral checklist of essential behaviors for effective skill performance)
  • Modeling Exercise (skill demonstration)
  • Group Exercises (role play, exercise, and case)
  • Application Questions
  • Reinforcement Exercises
  • Action Plan

This book can be used for any management course and is brief enough to supplement other course materials. Please see the preface for more details.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780139550140
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 11/27/2000
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 522
  • Product dimensions: 7.82 (w) x 10.06 (h) x 0.84 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

The need for training in managerial skills has been more pronounced over the last decade. Industry, the media, teaching faculty, and the accrediting agencies of business school programs4 have all noted the weakness in interpersonal skills among recent business graduates. A corporate recruiter succinctly summarized their concerns:

Today's business graduates have an abundance of technical knowledge. They
can do linear programming problems, calculate a discounted rate of return,
develop a sophisticated marketing plan, and crunch numbers on a computer
spreadsheet. They're technically solid, but most lack the interpersonal and social
skills necessary to manage people. If there is an area where business schools
need to improve, it's in developing the "people skills" of their graduates.

Management is an applied topic, but if its classroom presentation traces the history of management research and theory development, it can leave students no better prepared to actually be a manager. Conceptual frameworks can provide business school graduates with needed information and ideas to understand management situations, but to become effective managers students need practice in behaving as managers and they need to receive feedback on their performance. The required shift today is from learning concepts for better understanding to learning skills for enhanced behaviors. As stated by one scholar of management education, "Management students need practice in motivating others to perform tasks and achieve goals, not just readings that compare and contrast six differenttheories of motivation."

Background of This Book

Management faculty in colleges and universities have increasingly come to recognize the importance of developing managerial skill competencies in their students. To fulfill this need a number of skills books have been published over last 10 years, including Training in Interpersonal Skills (TIPS), the second edition of which I had the privilege of coauthoring with Steve Robbins. TIPS is widely used in courses such as organizational behavior, management, human relations, supervision, organizational development, and interpersonal relations. It is also used in executive development programs where its action-oriented format favoring practicing and receiving feedback, versus conceptual lectures, is especially effective. It particularly benefits practicing managers who do not have the time for long reading assignments, nor the patience to sit through hours of theoretical lectures. The growing need for management skills training coupled with the success of the TIPS learning formula generated the natural progression to create a comprehensive learning package covering the full gamut of managerial skills, as opposed to focusing on just "interpersonal" skills as TIPS and most of the other skills books do.

Another stimulus for creating a comprehensive management skills textbook came from the continual inquiries we receive from management professors for recommendations about supplemental readings they can put together with TIPS to form a complete management skills course. TIPS was created as a supplement to traditional management texts, which quite often do not provide opportunities for students to apply their conceptual learning. The role-plays in TIPS supply action-oriented exercises where students can receive feedback from their peers and develop action plans for real-world applications. Some professors were concerned, however, about the cost to the student of a comprehensive management text and another supplemental skills book.

Most often this problem is solved by combining TIPS with a smaller paperback "essentials" book, which summarizes the main management concepts from a complete hardback management text. However, another problem remains: TIPS deals only with interpersonal skills, while management functions include additional conceptual and analytical skills. Consequently, professors wishing to provide practical training in the full range of skills considered essential for managerial success lack the exercises to do so. Training in Management Skills (TIMS) was a natural evolution to solve this problem. It combines the essential management concepts with training exercises for each of the critical skills required for students to improve their own personal management competencies.

Hence, TIMS provides a complete management skills training package. Additional textbooks or supplemental readings are not needed. In TIMS, the relevant concepts are presented as they apply to the specific behaviors necessary to successfully practice any given management skill. As one reviewer stated, "I feel that this material is super. This is the type of material that progressive schools are moving toward. This is the next step after the initial skills approaches to teaching management. You are to be commended in your insights and efforts to contributing to this progression."

Organization of the Book

Each chapter of the book is organized around the learning model refined for TIPS from social learning theory, which combines relevant concepts with opportunities to practice and apply observable behaviors. This learning model contains 10 components that ask students to do the following tasks:

  • Assess their basic skill level.
  • Review key concepts that are relevant to applying the skill.
  • Test their conceptual knowledge.
  • Identify on a checklist the specific behavioral dimensions that they need to learn for each skill.
  • Observe how to apply the skill through watching others in a modeling exercise.
  • Practice the skill in small groups.
  • Use a summary checklist to identify their deficiencies.
  • Answer application questions to cement practical understanding of the concepts.
  • Complete reinforcement exercises outside the classroom.
  • Develop an action plan for ongoing skill improvement in their own life.

The chapters and appendixes in this text each represent key skill areas essential for managerial success. After two introductory chapters explaining the field of management and general strategies to improve management skills, four integrative skills that are essential to effective management across a broad range of situations are presented so that they can be reinforced throughout the course. They include effective communication, time and stress management, diversity, and ethics. For instructors wishing to emphasize the critical communication skills of oral and written presentations, two skill-building appendixes are included at the end of the book.

The remainder of the book is organized around the traditional functions of management: planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling. Part III presents the planning and control skills of goal setting, planning, evaluating performance, and creative problem solving. Part IV covers the organizing and staffing skills of designing work, identifying and hiring employees, creating high-performance teams, and diagnosing and modifying organizational culture. Part V explains the leading skills of change management, building power bases, motivating others, developing subordinates, and managing conflict.

Supplements

This book is accompanied by a user-friendly set of supplements, including the following:

INSTRUCTOR'S MANUAL
Each chapter includes learning objectives, an overview, a detailed lecture outline, and teaching notes to selected chapter exercises. Additional teaching suggestions also complement the chapters.

TEST ITEM FILE
Each chapter contains multiple-choice, true/false, and essay questions. Together, the questions cover the content of each chapter in a variety of ways to test the students' knowledge of the text.

WINDOWS/PRENTICE HALL TEST MANAGER, VERSION 4.0
Containing all of the questions in the printed Test Item File, Test Manager is a comprehensive suite of tools for testing and assessment. Test Manager allows educators to easily create and distribute tests for their courses, either by printing and distributing through traditional methods, or by online delivery via a Local Area Network (LAN) server.

INSTRUCTOR'S RESOURCE CD-ROM
This CD-ROM contains the electronic Instructor's Manual, Test Manager, and PowerPoint Electronic Transparencies. The PowerPoint Transparencies, a comprehensive package of text outlines and figures corresponding to the text, are designed to aid the educator and supplement in-class lectures.

COMPANION WEB SITE
The Prentice Hall Companion Web Site, www.prenhall.com/hunsaker, features an interactive and exciting online Student Study Guide. Students can access multiple-choice, true/false; and Internet-based essay questions that accompany each chapter in the text. Objective questions are scored online, and incorrect answers are keyed to the text for student review. For more information, contact your local sales representative.

SKILLS VIDEO
The Skills Video segments focus on a fictional video production company, Quick Takes Video. In these segments, professional actors address real business problems and the skills needed to manage them. Students receive questions throughout these segments and are asked to consider them. They then receive advice from experts in the field. The Skills Videos offer a fund, hands-on way to view today's business world and learn the skills necessary to succeed within it.

PRENTICE HALL SELF-ASSESSMENT LIBRARY CD-ROM
This library is comprised of 45 self-assessments, organized by individual, group, and organizational skills. Exercises are scored automatically and analyzed. It is also available in a printed format.

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Table of Contents

I. INTRODUCTION.

1. Management Skills and Managerial Effectiveness.
2. Self-Awareness: Understanding and Developing Yourself.

II. GENERAL INTEGRATATIVE SKILLS.

3. Interpersonal Communicating.
4. Valuing Diversity.
5. Developing Ethical Guideposts.
6. Managing Stress and Time.

III. PLANNING AND CONTROL SKILLS.

7. Planning and Goal Setting.
8. Evaluating and Controlling Performance.
9. Creative Problem Solving.

IV. ORGANIZING SKILLS.

10. Designing Work.
11. Identifying and Hiring Employees.
12. Creating High-Performing Teams.
13. Diagnosing and Modifying Organizational Culture.

V. LEADING SKILLS.

14. Building a Power Base.
15. Leading Change.
16. Motivating Others.
17. Developing Subordinates.
18. Managing Conflict.
Appendix A: Oral Presentation Skills.
Appendix B: Written Communication Skills.
Glossary.
Index.

Read More Show Less

Preface

PREFACE:

Preface

The need for training in managerial skills has been more pronounced over the last decade. Industry, the media, teaching faculty, and the accrediting agencies of business school programs4 have all noted the weakness in interpersonal skills among recent business graduates. A corporate recruiter succinctly summarized their concerns:

Today's business graduates have an abundance of technical knowledge. They
can do linear programming problems, calculate a discounted rate of return,
develop a sophisticated marketing plan, and crunch numbers on a computer
spreadsheet. They're technically solid, but most lack the interpersonal and social
skills necessary to manage people. If there is an area where business schools
need to improve, it's in developing the "people skills" of their graduates.

Management is an applied topic, but if its classroom presentation traces the history of management research and theory development, it can leave students no better prepared to actually be a manager. Conceptual frameworks can provide business school graduates with needed information and ideas to understand management situations, but to become effective managers students need practice in behaving as managers and they need to receive feedback on their performance. The required shift today is from learning concepts for better understanding to learning skills for enhanced behaviors. As stated by one scholar of management education, "Management students need practice in motivating others to perform tasks and achieve goals, not just readings that compare and contrast sixdifferenttheories of motivation."

Background of This Book

Management faculty in colleges and universities have increasingly come to recognize the importance of developing managerial skill competencies in their students. To fulfill this need a number of skills books have been published over last 10 years, including Training in Interpersonal Skills (TIPS), the second edition of which I had the privilege of coauthoring with Steve Robbins. TIPS is widely used in courses such as organizational behavior, management, human relations, supervision, organizational development, and interpersonal relations. It is also used in executive development programs where its action-oriented format favoring practicing and receiving feedback, versus conceptual lectures, is especially effective. It particularly benefits practicing managers who do not have the time for long reading assignments, nor the patience to sit through hours of theoretical lectures. The growing need for management skills training coupled with the success of the TIPS learning formula generated the natural progression to create a comprehensive learning package covering the full gamut of managerial skills, as opposed to focusing on just "interpersonal" skills as TIPS and most of the other skills books do.

Another stimulus for creating a comprehensive management skills textbook came from the continual inquiries we receive from management professors for recommendations about supplemental readings they can put together with TIPS to form a complete management skills course. TIPS was created as a supplement to traditional management texts, which quite often do not provide opportunities for students to apply their conceptual learning. The role-plays in TIPS supply action-oriented exercises where students can receive feedback from their peers and develop action plans for real-world applications. Some professors were concerned, however, about the cost to the student of a comprehensive management text and another supplemental skills book.

Most often this problem is solved by combining TIPS with a smaller paperback "essentials" book, which summarizes the main management concepts from a complete hardback management text. However, another problem remains: TIPS deals only with interpersonal skills, while management functions include additional conceptual and analytical skills. Consequently, professors wishing to provide practical training in the full range of skills considered essential for managerial success lack the exercises to do so. Training in Management Skills (TIMS) was a natural evolution to solve this problem. It combines the essential management concepts with training exercises for each of the critical skills required for students to improve their own personal management competencies.

Hence, TIMS provides a complete management skills training package. Additional textbooks or supplemental readings are not needed. In TIMS, the relevant concepts are presented as they apply to the specific behaviors necessary to successfully practice any given management skill. As one reviewer stated, "I feel that this material is super. This is the type of material that progressive schools are moving toward. This is the next step after the initial skills approaches to teaching management. You are to be commended in your insights and efforts to contributing to this progression."

Organization of the Book

Each chapter of the book is organized around the learning model refined for TIPS from social learning theory, which combines relevant concepts with opportunities to practice and apply observable behaviors. This learning model contains 10 components that ask students to do the following tasks:

  • Assess their basic skill level.
  • Review key concepts that are relevant to applying the skill.
  • Test their conceptual knowledge.
  • Identify on a checklist the specific behavioral dimensions that they need to learn for each skill.
  • Observe how to apply the skill through watching others in a modeling exercise.
  • Practice the skill in small groups.
  • Use a summary checklist to identify their deficiencies.
  • Answer application questions to cement practical understanding of the concepts.
  • Complete reinforcement exercises outside the classroom.
  • Develop an action plan for ongoing skill improvement in their own life.

The chapters and appendixes in this text each represent key skill areas essential for managerial success. After two introductory chapters explaining the field of management and general strategies to improve management skills, four integrative skills that are essential to effective management across a broad range of situations are presented so that they can be reinforced throughout the course. They include effective communication, time and stress management, diversity, and ethics. For instructors wishing to emphasize the critical communication skills of oral and written presentations, two skill-building appendixes are included at the end of the book.

The remainder of the book is organized around the traditional functions of management: planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling. Part III presents the planning and control skills of goal setting, planning, evaluating performance, and creative problem solving. Part IV covers the organizing and staffing skills of designing work, identifying and hiring employees, creating high-performance teams, and diagnosing and modifying organizational culture. Part V explains the leading skills of change management, building power bases, motivating others, developing subordinates, and managing conflict.

Supplements

This book is accompanied by a user-friendly set of supplements, including the following:

INSTRUCTOR'S MANUAL
Each chapter includes learning objectives, an overview, a detailed lecture outline, and teaching notes to selected chapter exercises. Additional teaching suggestions also complement the chapters.

TEST ITEM FILE
Each chapter contains multiple-choice, true/false, and essay questions. Together, the questions cover the content of each chapter in a variety of ways to test the students' knowledge of the text.

WINDOWS/PRENTICE HALL TEST MANAGER, VERSION 4.0
Containing all of the questions in the printed Test Item File, Test Manager is a comprehensive suite of tools for testing and assessment. Test Manager allows educators to easily create and distribute tests for their courses, either by printing and distributing through traditional methods, or by online delivery via a Local Area Network (LAN) server.

INSTRUCTOR'S RESOURCE CD-ROM
This CD-ROM contains the electronic Instructor's Manual, Test Manager, and PowerPoint Electronic Transparencies. The PowerPoint Transparencies, a comprehensive package of text outlines and figures corresponding to the text, are designed to aid the educator and supplement in-class lectures.

COMPANION WEB SITE
The Prentice Hall Companion Web Site, www.prenhall.com/hunsaker, features an interactive and exciting online Student Study Guide. Students can access multiple-choice, true/false; and Internet-based essay questions that accompany each chapter in the text. Objective questions are scored online, and incorrect answers are keyed to the text for student review. For more information, contact your local sales representative.

SKILLS VIDEO
The Skills Video segments focus on a fictional video production company, Quick Takes Video. In these segments, professional actors address real business problems and the skills needed to manage them. Students receive questions throughout these segments and are asked to consider them. They then receive advice from experts in the field. The Skills Videos offer a fund, hands-on way to view today's business world and learn the skills necessary to succeed within it.

PRENTICE HALL SELF-ASSESSMENT LIBRARY CD-ROM
This library is comprised of 45 self-assessments, organized by individual, group, and organizational skills. Exercises are scored automatically and analyzed. It is also available in a printed format.

Read More Show Less

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