The Trains that Climb the Winter Tree

The Trains that Climb the Winter Tree

2.3 3
by Michael Swanwick, Eileen Gunn
     
 

When the elves come out of the mirrors one Christmas, they send Sasha on a harrowing train trip to get back a brother she never knew she had.

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Overview

When the elves come out of the mirrors one Christmas, they send Sasha on a harrowing train trip to get back a brother she never knew she had.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781429994453
Publisher:
Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date:
03/15/2011
Series:
A Tor.Com Original
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
810,605
File size:
333 KB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Michael Swanwick is an American science fiction writer, born on November 18, 1950 in Schenectady, New York. Swanwick's novels and short fiction have won numerous awards, including the 1990 Sturgeon Award for "The Edge of the World"; the 1992 Nebula Award for his novel Stations of the Tide; the 1996 World Fantasy Award for "Radio Waves"; and a remarkable run of Hugo Awards for short fiction, five of them in six years: "The Very Pulse of the Machine" in 1999, "Scherzo with Tyrannosaur" in 2000, "The Dog Said Bow-Wow" in 2002, "Slow Life" in 2003, and "Legions in Time" in 2004. Recent novels of note include 1997's Jack Faust, 2002's Bones of the Earth, and 2008's The Dragons of Babel, a fantasy set in the same grittily re-imagined version of Faerie as his 1993 novel The Iron Dragon's Daughter. In 2009 he published Hope-in-the-Mist, a book-length study of British novelist and poet Hope Mirrlees, author of the 1926 fantasy novel Lud-in-the-Mist. Michael Swanwick lives in Philadelphia with his wife, Marianne Porter. They have one grown son, Sean.

Eileen Gunn is an American science fiction writer and editor, born in 1945 in Massachusetts. She is the author of a small but distinguished body of short fiction published over the last three decades. Her story "Coming to Terms" won the Nebula Award in 2004. The same year saw the publication of her collection Stable Strategies and Others. Her other work in science fiction includes editing the pioneering webzine The Infinite Matrix and producing the website The Difference Dictionary, a concordance to The Difference Engine by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling. A graduate of Clarion, Gunn now serves as a director of Clarion West. Other life experiences have included working as Director of Advertising at Microsoft (reporting directly to Steve Ballmer), traveling across Siberia in 1973, and being a member of an outlaw bike club.


Michael Swanwick is the winner of five Hugo Awards for his short fiction. His several novels include the Nebula-winning Stations of the Tide, the time-travel novel Bones of the Earth, and the “industrial fantasy” novels The Iron Dragon’s Daughter and The Dragons of Babel. He lives in Philadelphia.
Eileen Gunn is an American science fiction writer and editor, born in 1945 in Massachusetts. She is the author of a small but distinguished body of short fiction published over the last three decades. Her story “Coming to Terms” won the Nebula Award in 2004. The same year saw the publication of her collection Stable Strategies and Others. Her other work in science fiction includes editing the pioneering webzine The Infinite Matrix and producing the website The Difference Dictionary, a concordance to The Difference Engine by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling. A graduate of Clarion, Gunn now serves as a director of Clarion West. Other life experiences have included working as Director of Advertising at Microsoft (reporting directly to Steve Ballmer), traveling across Siberia in 1973, and being a member of an outlaw bike club.

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Trains That Climb the Winter Tree 2.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This story is imaginative, but so disjointed and bizarre that it is difficult to follow. The adults are all murdered? By elves? The dog is actually a drunk and the Grim Reaper is named Lord Snow -- complete with white suit? What in the name of good literature is any of this about? The characters are shallow and not believable. They have no motivation. The story line is impossible to follow. The children travel in time on the train, and mature into adults with no benefit of wisdom or guidance. And in a sudden moment of clarity, the little girl realizes she is an adult and she magically knows the answer to the all important question. The whole thing is ill-conceived and nothing I would ever have read to my child. And I'm sorry that I wasted my time reading it to myself. If I could give it a zero star, I would.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fell down exaushted from running. She set her chin down on her paws and lay there thinking. Her eyes were dull with sadness. -Skystep