Traipsing into Evolution: Intelligent Design and the Kitzmiller V. Dover Decision

Overview

Traipsing into Evolution: Intelligent Design and the Kitzmiller v. Dover Decision is a legal critique of of the factual and legal flaws in Judge John E. Jones III's Kitzmiller et al. v. Dover Area School Board (2005), a controversial district court decision about the teaching of intelligent design in public schools. Jointly authored by David K. DeWolf , John G. West, Casey Luskin, and Jonathan Witt.
Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Paperback
$11.61
BN.com price
(Save 22%)$14.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (14) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $8.93   
  • Used (8) from $0.00   
Sending request ...

More About This Book

Overview

Traipsing into Evolution: Intelligent Design and the Kitzmiller v. Dover Decision is a legal critique of of the factual and legal flaws in Judge John E. Jones III's Kitzmiller et al. v. Dover Area School Board (2005), a controversial district court decision about the teaching of intelligent design in public schools. Jointly authored by David K. DeWolf , John G. West, Casey Luskin, and Jonathan Witt.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780963865496
  • Publisher: Discovery Institute
  • Publication date: 3/28/2006
  • Pages: 124
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.29 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2006

    ID Guilty of design by the unintelligent

    Judge Jones really came through for the science community, our kids, and thus our nations future. I have been following this whole creationism movement and learning their tactics. In fact, I have corresponded with one of the authors of this book. ID creationists are a new breed in the evolution of individuals who believe that 'darwinism' as they put it is the direct cause of various social problems such as war, racism, crime, etc. So I guess before Darwin published the observation that organisms are related human culture was in perfect harmony. In fact, the goal of ridding society of darwin and renewing culture in Christian principles is clearly stated as the goal of the Discovery Institute (ID headquarters) which can be read in the Wedge Document online. The IDists call ID science because they are merely searching for 'signs of intelligence' through information theory. That is absolutely ridiculous...the reason is that you can arbitrarily derive a bunch of equations to show that something has high information content and then POOF: conclude that it was designed! Brilliant! And then what? 'How was it designed?' 'Oh, we can't study that.' 'What is the mechanism of design?' 'We can't know the mind of the designer.' ID relies on supernatural causes, which can by the way explain away anything and everything without providing any insight. Our kids are lazy enough today without giving them a magic wand to say 'Bipity bopity boo, this was designed'. Lets keep science a rigorous discipline and let the IDists marvel at the 'designer's product' in reclusion at the Discovery Center 'think tank'. Many philosophers and clergy are equally concerned by the IDers because they are taking faith out of religion. The reason is simple: 'We can detect God'. Thankfully, because of the IDists, we can quantify godlyness in objects and verify God's existence.' What a relief, faith is so difficult. In the end, despite the overwhelming evidence for evolution many people will never accept it (Young Earth Creationists, many evangelical Christians, etc.) because it is in direct conflict with a literal interpretation of Genesis. In addition, most people flat out don't accept it due either to misinterpreting it, or never being exposed to evolutionary concepts. Evolution is barely brushed over in high school and there are no basic intro courses for non-majors in most colleges. IDists absolutely love the fact that the general public doesn't really understand evolution or science. I didn't take evolution until my senior your of college as a bio major. This is a basic problem with our education system. In fact, many wish for kids to be homeschooled (Phillip Johnson) so they will only be exposed to the Christian perspective. It is important for the future of their movement. Teach the controversy? The only ones who think there is a controversy are the creationists. Idists wish the schools would give 'equal time to alternative theories'. However, we must use the scientific definition of a theory, which is basically not much different from a law. ID is not a theory, because THERE HAVE NEVER BEEN ANY EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION OF IT'S CLAIMS. Don't buy the hype, ID is not science and is also built upon faulty premises.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2006

    Accurate, important, and timely

    Traipsing Into Evolution is a timely criticism of judicial overreaching arising out of the Kitzmiller v. Dover intelligent design trial. It gives a thoughtful, yet succinct, analysis of the errors of the Kitzmiller court. This book is a must read for both proponents and critics of intelligent design. Unless critics of intelligent design grapple with the arguments in this book, their criticisms will be as intellectually anemic as that of the court. The authors of Traipsing Into Evolution present an insightful view of both the history and merits of intelligent design as well as the profound shortcomings of the Kitzmiller court. As an attorney that has worked extensively on this issue, the book has the ring of accuracy.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2006

    A good laymen's overview of the Kitzmiller decision

    This book by the discovery institute is premised on the notion that Kitzmiller v. Dover decision was a one-sided, partisan, anti-religious opinion. I would concur. The book does a good job outlining: (1) the history of the ID movement, (2) the status of ID as scientific, and (3) the un-neutral treatment that ID received under the Establishment Clause caselaw. There is another section on precedent, but as a lawyer, I found it too brief. The section on the history of ID is fascinating. It traces the movement from ancient times and philosophers, which rebuts the presumption that ID = creationism, which it does not. The second chapter on the scientific status of ID is well written¿it is the meat of the book and by far the most important. This section defines what science is and ought to be/ought not be, as well as covers how theories can develop in science. It rebuts the argument that ID is not ¿science¿ in a way that makes Judge Jones seem like an Article III judge that has overstepped his authority. (and based off the Supreme Court¿s rendering of Daubert, I would agree) The third major section deals with the un-neutral treatment of ID as religious. While I think most law nerds would prefer more of a deeper understanding of Lemon and Lynch, this is a good overview of why the Kitzmiller decision did not deal with the Establish Clause case law in a proper manner. The section on secondary effects was particularly poignant. The appendices are informative. This is the section that I think is best read in conjunction with the actual Dover opinion. Read both and you will get a good understanding of both sides of the issue. In summary, it is a good critique of the Dover opinion, and I would wholeheartedly recommend that it actually be read side-by-side with the Dover opinion. It also directed not to legal scholars, but laymen. Because this case has gotten so much publicity, much of the media has hyped the opinion as being the death-knell for ID. This book is a good primer on what other evidence was actually before the court, and not just the very one-sided view that the court delivered. If you are looking for heavy legal analysis, this may not be your best bet. If you are looking to understand the issues in the case and not get flooded with legalese, this is definitely worth a read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2006

    Millions spent to censor

    Traipsing Into Evolution is a much needed critique the Kitzmiller V. Dover Decision by Judge Jone's. I find this case incredible. The ACLU spent millions of dollars to insure that students did not hear the following words: ''Because Darwin's Theory is a theory, it is still being tested as new evidence is discovered. The Theory is not a fact. Gaps in the Theory exist for which there is no evidence. A theory is defined as a well-tested explanation that unifies a broad range of observations.'' Intelligent design is an explanation of the origin of life that differs from Darwin's view. The reference book, Of Pandas and People is available for students to see if they would like to explore this view in an effort to gain an understanding of what intelligent design actually involves. As is true with any theory, students are encouraged to keep an open mind. The school leaves the discussion of the origins of life to individual students and their families. As a standards-driven district, class instruction focuses upon preparing students to achieve proficiency on standards-based assessments'' The court ruled that it was unconstitutional to say these words to students. Darwinism must not be questioned. As a biologist I find this abhorrent. Teachers should be able to discuss the widely acknowledged problems with Neo-Darwinism openly and professionally. They should also eschew discussing religion in a science class. This book shows that the court has clearly limited the freedom to discuss this issue, and has actually endorsed a view that has religious implications while forbidding another view that also has religious implications. The court was thus not neutral, but has sided with one view, evolutionary naturalism. It has also, as this book documents, negated both the letter and the spirit of the disclaimer. Students are discouraged from keeping an open mind, at least about this topic and are taught one creation story as fact, the Neo-Darwinian theory of evolution. As the authors point out in toned down legalese, this decision no longer puts Darwin Doubters at the back of the bus as was the situation before this court case, but ruled that they are not even allowed on the bus. Is this the new segregation? As my friends point out they can get on he bus but must pretend to be someone else.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2006

    A good laymen's overview of the Kitzmiller decision

    This book by the discovery institute is premised on the notion that Kitzmiller v. Dover decision was a one-sided, partisan, anti-religious opinion. I would concur. The book does a good job outlining: (1) the history of the ID movement, (2) the status of ID as scientific, and (3) the un-neutral treatment that ID received under the Establishment Clause caselaw. The second chapter on the scientific status of ID is well written-it is the meat of the book and by far the most important. This section defines what science is and ought to be/ought not be, as well as covers how theories can develop in science. It rebuts the argument that ID is not 'science' in a way that makes Judge Jones seem like an Article III judge that has overstepped his authority. (and based off the Supreme Court's rendering of Daubert, I would agree) In summary, it is a good critique of the Dover opinion, and I would wholeheartedly recommend that it actually be read side-by-side with the Dover opinion. It also directed not to legal scholars, but laymen. Because this case has gotten so much publicity, much of the media has hyped the opinion as being the death-knell for ID. This book is a good primer on what other evidence was actually before the court, and not just the very one-sided view that the court delivered. If you are looking for heavy legal analysis, this may not be your best bet. If you are looking to understand the issues in the case and not get flooded with legalese, this is definitely worth a read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2006

    Darwinian Orthodoxy

    This book is great in revealing how entrenched Darwinian Dogma has become in our culture. Specifically, it shows how Judge Jones' Katzmiller decision uses the faulty reasoning that empirical evidence that doesn't support Darwinian evolution can't be science. It is sad and ironic that eighty years after 'Scopes' made it possible to teach evolution in public schools in Tennessee, judges are now leading us to a place where schools and teachers can't teach anything but Darwinism...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2006

    Seminal Book on Evolution, Law, and Education

    In his opinion, Judge Jones declared that in order to preserve the separation of church and state mandated by the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution teachers in the Dover Area School District are were no longer allowed to 'denigrate or disparage the scientific theory of evolution.' It is clear to most that the actions taken by the Dover Area School Board were misguided. The question left to be answered, however, is whether Jones' cure was worse than the disease. Traipsing into Evolution is seminal in answering just that question.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)