Tramp: The Life of Charlie Chaplin [NOOK Book]

Overview

Charlie Chaplin made an amazing seventy-one films by the time he was only thirty-three years old. He was known not only as the world’s first international movie star, but as a comedian, a film director, and a man ripe with scandal, accused of plagiarism, communism, pacifism, liberalism, and anti-Americanism. He seduced young women, marrying four different times, each time to a woman younger than the last. In this animated biography of Chaplin, Joyce Milton reveals to us a life riddled with gossip and a struggle ...
See more details below
Tramp: The Life of Charlie Chaplin

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$3.99
BN.com price

Overview

Charlie Chaplin made an amazing seventy-one films by the time he was only thirty-three years old. He was known not only as the world’s first international movie star, but as a comedian, a film director, and a man ripe with scandal, accused of plagiarism, communism, pacifism, liberalism, and anti-Americanism. He seduced young women, marrying four different times, each time to a woman younger than the last. In this animated biography of Chaplin, Joyce Milton reveals to us a life riddled with gossip and a struggle to rise from an impoverished London childhood to the life of a successful American film star. Milton shows us how the creation of his famous character—the Tramp, the Little Fellow—was both rewarding and then devastating as he became obsolete with the changes of time. Tramp is a perceptive, clever, and captivating biography of a talented and complicated man whose life was filled with scandal, politics, and art.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Despite its title's potential as a double entendre, Milton's substantial biography of Chaplin is hardly dirt-dishing. Eschewing what she calls "pathography," Milton presents a well-researched, evenhanded portrait of a troubled entertainment genius. Starting with Chaplin's roots in late-19th-century British poverty-a history the actor himself obscured-the author traces his complex relationships to a manic-depressive mother, vaudeville theater and the infant film industry, as well as to the celebrity, controversy and exile that marked his later years. Chaplin, a socially awkward man of erratic moods and creative spurts, suffered internal conflicts over money-though immensely wealthy, he was a notorious penny-pincher-as well as over his liaisons with startlingly young women. Milton tackles these exploitable topics with respect, however, depicting the actor/director as a man whose ambition, fortune and left-leaning political sympathies have had far-reaching effects on the business and PR structure of Hollywood today-as has the public aftermath of his seemingly unsavory marriages and love affairs. Milton's clear rendering of one of the first film superstars, and of the fickle public scrutiny that followed him, doubles then-as did her superb life of the Lindberghs, Loss of Eden (1992)-as a sweeping look at the first half of the 20th century. Photos not seen by PW. Author tour; U.K., translation, first serial, dramatic rights: Barbara Lowenstein. (June)
Library Journal
Chaplin's life spanned momentous events in film history, including the silent-to-sound transition and the advent of morality codes, not to mention two world wars and the HUAC hearings. With this context in mind, Milton (Lost Eden: A Biography of Charles and Anne Lindbergh, LJ 11/15/92) shows how Chaplin, brought up in London's East End culture, was instilled with a class consciousness that later resonated in his Communist sympathies and his creation of the lumpenproletariat icon of the "Little Guy"-the celluloid role he could never eclipse. Yet his lavish movie-star lifestyle betrayed his professed beliefs. Milton suggests that Chaplin's intellectual pretensions and political dilettantism were veneers covering his own internalized class struggle and the manic depression that both plagued and sustained him creatively. Chronicled are Chaplin's baptism by anarchic comedy with Sennett; his precedent-setting salary negotiations; his cavalier approach to production issues; and his quest for the perfect leading lady. The paradoxes presented are not new, but Milton gives insight into an enigma. Where other biographers have either lauded Chaplin as a frustrated artist or vilified him as an immoral entertainer, Milton lets the reader decide. Recommended for larger film collections.-Jayne Kate Plymale-Jackson, Univ. of Georgia Libs., Athens
Gordon Flagg
Sixty years after his last appearance, Charlie Chaplin's screen persona, the little tramp, remains one of the movies' most recognized icons, which perhaps justifies a new biography of the comedian in every decade. Milton is less circumspect about Chaplin's libertine ways than previous biographers have been. Chaplin's filmmaking career remains paramount, of course, but Milton pays perhaps disproportionate attention to his divorces, suicide attempts, nervous breakdowns, paternity suits, Mann Act violations, alleged plagiarisms, and other indiscretions and to the half-baked leftist sympathies that prompted the political harassment that drove Chaplin out of the U.S. in 1952. These emphases aren't quite prurient--and in this age of supermarket tabloids, the consequent revelations won't offend many--but they skew the book's tone. Moreover, Milton's credentials as journalist and historian don't much qualify her to write knowledgeably about Chaplin's artistry; Robinson's "Chaplin" 1985, which Milton draws on heavily, is preferable in this regard, and it covers the life more than adequately. For libraries lacking Robinson's effort, this is a satisfactory-enough substitute.
Washington Times
Beautifully written, painstakingly researched, unblinkingly shrewd. -- Washington Times
Kirkus Reviews
The little tramp takes some hard, muddy pratfalls in this masterful portrait of the artist as a swine.

With anyone as well-chronicled as Charlie Chaplin, a new biography must pass the strictest tests of originality. Does it say something new or recast what is known in a different light? Milton (Loss of Eden, 1992, etc.) meets these criteria and more in this major reevaluation of a filmmaker whose one saving grace was his ability to make people laugh. His squalid London childhood was appalling—poverty, a mentally unstable actress mother, an absent alcoholic father. Chaplin got out as soon as he could, finding unexpected success as a music hall pantomime performer. Though Hollywood was eager to have him, he made little mark in his first few films. Then he created his "Tramp" character—the absurd mustache, the bowler and cane, the uneasy mix of pathos and buffoonery—and became a star of almost unimaginable proportions. Fame is rarely ennobling, but with Chaplin it offered too many opportunities to indulge his weaknesses. He pursued women—especially teenagers—obsessively; he cheated friends, cheated the IRS, stole ideas, supported unpleasant causes. All of this had little effect on his movies; perhaps it was even the wellspring of his talent, until he succumbed to the comedian's fatal temptation of taking himself seriously. Milton is particularly devastating in her analysis of how his films turned from ingenious slapstick to leaden, Stalinist posturings. Diagnosing the dead is always an iffy proposition, but she also makes an excellent case for Chaplin having been afflicted with manic-depression. Certainly, this would help explain his innumerable inconsistencies as well as his wild mood swings in which bursts of activity were followed by idle, sullen stretches.

Despite the profusion of negatives, this is not a hatchet job. Rather, Milton presents a complex, insightful portrait of a man in whom genius and iniquity were inseparably combined.

Washington Times
“Tramp is the best Hollywood biography I have ever read; beautifully written, painstakingly researched, unblinkingly shrewd in pursuit of Chaplin’s labyrinthine personality, and an analysis of the comedic art that is itself funny – a literary accomplishment even rarer than sexy sex scenes.”
Publisher's Weekly
“Substantial…[A] well-researched, evenhanded portrait of a troubled entertainment genius…Milton’s clear rendering of one of the first film superstars, and of the fickle public scrutiny that followed him, doubles…as a sweeping look at the first half of the 20th century.”
- Kirkus
“[A] masterful portrait of the artist as a swine…Milton presents a complex, insightful portrait of a man in whom genius and iniquity were inseparably combined.”
Chicago Tribune
“Fair, balanced, and highly readable…Milton has provided…a more complete view of his time in America than any previous biographer.”
Philadelphia Inquirer
“Compelling and provocative…The beam of limelight that Milton shines on Chaplin exposes much.”
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781497659162
  • Publisher: Open Road Media
  • Publication date: 7/1/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 606
  • Sales rank: 213,373
  • File size: 8 MB

Meet the Author

Joyce Milton is the author of Loss of Eden: A Biography of Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, The Yellow Kids: Foreign Correspondents in the Heyday of Yellow JournalismTramp: The Life of Charlie ChaplinThe Rosenberg File (with Ronald Radosh), and Vicki (with Anne Bardash).
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2013

    The roots of modern Hollywood hell

    If you're a communist, read some other slobbering tribute to him. If you love his early, pure comedic genius, this book is like "The Rink." Balanced, yet bruising.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2013

    Great ARTIST

    Without his sence of slapstcick we would't have things like bugs bunny or any other cartoon with his influence I'm a huge fan charlie chaplin and i've read almost every thing about him great comdien

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2012

    Hate it

    Hated it

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 14, 2012

    Very dry read that gives you information much like an encyclopedia.

    This is a very dry historical view of Charlie Chaplin's life. It reads like an encyclopedia instead of a novel or biography. There is not emotion and no heart to this book. Although Chaplin had an interesting life, it didn't show through this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2012

    Do not read this book if you want to know the real Chaplin!

    During the entire duration of this "biography", you can tell that yeah some of these facts may be true, but the entire tone of the book seems like Milton has a bone to pick with Chaplin and shes making him seem like a horrid person. Read David Robinson's "Chaplin". Its MUCH more factual and not as attacking.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)