Trans-Canada Rail Guide, 5th: includes city guides to Halifax, Quebec City, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, Edmonton, Jasper, Calgary, Churchill and Vancouver

Overview

The world’s most scenic rail rideA journey on Canada’s transcontinental railroad ranks as one of the greatest rail experiences in the world. Stretching from the Atlantic to the Pacific, the lines span 6358km (3974 miles), taking in not only several of North America’s finest cities but also some of the most dramatic scenery on earth, including the spectacular Rocky Mountains. Rail travel for all budgets – where to get the best deals whether you are looking for the cheapest rail tickets with shoestring ...
See more details below
Paperback (Fifth Edition)
$16.31
BN.com price
(Save 28%)$22.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $12.54   
  • New (7) from $13.57   
  • Used (3) from $12.54   
Sending request ...

Overview

The world’s most scenic rail rideA journey on Canada’s transcontinental railroad ranks as one of the greatest rail experiences in the world. Stretching from the Atlantic to the Pacific, the lines span 6358km (3974 miles), taking in not only several of North America’s finest cities but also some of the most dramatic scenery on earth, including the spectacular Rocky Mountains. Rail travel for all budgets – where to get the best deals whether you are looking for the cheapest rail tickets with shoestring accommodation along the way or the most luxurious guided tours City guides and maps – the best sights, recommended hotels and restaurants in 10 major stops along the lines: Halifax, Quebec City, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, Edmonton, Jasper, Calgary, Churchill and Vancouver Mile-by-mile route guide – what to see along the route; with 28 maps Railway history – the rail link that created modern Canada
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781905864331
  • Publisher: Trailblazer Publications
  • Publication date: 1/11/2011
  • Edition description: Fifth Edition
  • Edition number: 5
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 410,223
  • Product dimensions: 4.70 (w) x 7.00 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Melissa Graham grew up only yards from a railway line, in Sunderland in the north of England. She claims to be a direct descendant of George Stephenson, the Father of Railways.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Trans-Canada Rail Guide, 5th

includes city guides to Halifax, Quebec City, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, Edmonton, Calgary and Vancouver
By Graham, Melissa

Trailblazer Publications

Copyright © 2010 Graham, Melissa
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9781905864331

Introduction

No other mode of transport conveys such an acute sense of Canada’s vastness, of its beautiful, desolate, wide-open spaces. Endless stretches of track take you through a wilderness scarcely touched by man. You can travel for hours without seeing a road or a house, or indeed any sign of habitation – it’s an incredible, almost haunting, experience.

            The railway is also the reason why this massive country exists at all. When the Dominion of Canada was created in 1867 it was no more than a set of loosely-connected colonies with no sense of unity or nationhood. It was, moreover, under a very real threat of being swallowed up by its powerful southern neighbour. The railroad was the single most important reason why this never happened: it gave the new country its life-blood and bound the provinces together into a transcontinental nation. When the last spike was driven in on 7 November 1885 it paved the way for rapid expansion, mass immigration and economic boom. Urban development ran parallel to the tracks and the stops along the line became the backbone of a new nation – which makes a rail trip today a fascinating journey into this young country’s history.

            What you’ll probably remember about the trip more than anything, though, is the dazzling scenery you travel through.

            On top of all this, a rail ride across Canada is a supremely relaxing experience, a rare joy in today’s climate of rapid communications and jet-travel. In the words of Robert Louis Stevenson, ‘the train disturbs so little the scenery through which it takes us, that our heart becomes full of the placidity and stillness of the country.’ Nowhere is this more true than in Canada.



Continues...

Excerpted from Trans-Canada Rail Guide, 5th by Graham, Melissa Copyright © 2010 by Graham, Melissa. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION - PART 1: PLANNING YOUR TRIP  1.1 Routes and costs – Route options – Breaking your journey – Costs – Rail tickets, passes and fares – 1.2 When to go – 1.3 Making a booking – With a tour or on your own? – VIA Rail sales agents – 1.4 Visas and medical insurance Visas – Medical insurance 1.5 What to take Clothes – Medical supplies – Money – Background reading 

PART 2: CANADA  2.1Facts about the country – Geographical background (climate, transport and communications, flora and fauna) – Historical outline – The Quebec issue – Economy – The people – Government – Education and social welfare – Religion – 2.2 Practical information for the visitor – Documents – Arriving in Canada – Hotels – Local transport – Electricity – Time – Money – Post and telecommunications – Newspapers – Holidays – Festivals – Food – Drink – What to do in the evening – Shopping – Taxes – Crime

PART 3: TRANS-CANADA RAILWAY 3.1 Building the first trans-Canada railway – Canada before the railway – The Pacific scandal – The railway under the Liberals – Over to the CPR – Dangers and difficulties – On the verge of bankruptcy – Completion of the railway – Early railway service – Into the 20th century: CNR and VIA Rail – Two more transcontinental lines – The CNR takes over – 3.2 The lines today – The Canadian – The Ocean – The Corridor – The Skeena – The Rocky Mountaineer – The Hudson Bay

PART 4: CITY GUIDES AND PLANS 4.1 Halifax – History – Arrival – Getting around – Orientation – Services – Where to stay – Map –Where to eat – Nightlife – What to see – Moving on – 4.2 Quebec City – History – Arrival – Getting around – Orientation – Services – Where to stay – Map –Where to eat – Nightlife – What to see – Festivals – Moving on – 4.3 Montreal – History – Arrival – Getting around – Orientation – Services – Where to stay – Map –Where to eat – Nightlife – What to see – Festivals – Moving on

– 4.4 Toronto – History – Arrival – Getting around – Orientation – Services – Where to stay – Map –Where to eat – Nightlife – What to see – Festivals – Moving on – 4.5 Winnipeg – History – Arrival – Getting around – Orientation – Services – Where to stay – Map –Where to eat – Nightlife – What to see – Festivals – Moving on

– 4.6 Edmonton – History – Arrival – Getting around – Orientation – Services – Where to stay – Map –Where to eat – Nightlife – What to see – Festivals – Moving on – 4.7 Calgary – History – Arrival – Getting around – Orientation – Services – Where to stay – Map –Where to eat – Nightlife – What to see – Festivals – Moving on

– 4.8 Vancouver – History – Arrival – Getting around – Orientation – Services – Where to stay – Map –Where to eat – Nightlife – What to see – Festivals – Moving on

PART 5: ROUTE GUIDES AND MAPS 5.1 Using this guide – Railway subdivisions, mile markers, signal masts, station names, stops, time zones – 5.2 The Ocean: Halifax to Montreal – 5.3 The Corridor route: Montreal to Toronto – 5.4 The Canadian: Toronto to Vancouver – 5.5 The Skeena: Jasper to Prince Rupert – 5.6 The Rocky Mountaineer: Calgary to Vancouver – 5.7 The Hudson Bay: Winnipeg to Churchill

APPENDICES 6.1 Timetables – 6.2 French words and phrases – 6.3 Bibliography

INDEX

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)