The Transatlantic Indian, 1776-1930

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Overview

"This is an important work of scholarship. By examining British responses to the presence of Indians in the Americas, and especially in North America, Flint offers a genuinely original perspective on both the history of representation of the figure of the Indian and the history of Indian-white relations. Her readings are smart and always judicious."—Lucy Maddox, Georgetown University

"Truly brilliant. Flint does what very few writers have done before, which is to acknowledge the role Native Americans—and the often contradictory representations of them—played in the British imagination. She brings her keen literary sensibility and her wonderful ability to read the visual culture of the Victorian era to this book in ways that do considerable justice to the complexity and importance of this topic."—Joseph W. Childers, University of California, Riverside

"An impressively comprehensive, ambitious, and informed book. Flint analyzes the cultural myths, stereotypes, and ideological constructions that shaped the understanding of Native Americans in a variety of British contexts and media, and also turns her lens upon Native American understandings of British culture. This is a very important book."—Amanda Anderson, Johns Hopkins University

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Editorial Reviews

19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century
It is in any case no surprise to report that Flint's readings of her sources are always searching and nuanced. The book is also very light on jargon; it is too intellectually confident for that. This will be a major text in the burgeoning field of transantlantic studies. It offers a distinctive portrait of Victorian culture that we have not seen before.
— Rohan McWilliam
Journal of Transatlantic Studies
Kate Flint's scholarly work is a fascinating and ground-breaking study of the Indian as both imagined in literature and visible in transatlantic encounters and exchanges. . . . Her extensive knowledge of both Victorian society and culture and tribal histories and cultures is evident throughout the work. . . . Flint's work establishes fruitful links with recent scholarship and debates which have successfully placed the Indian in a transatlantic perspective.
— Mandy Cooper
English Literature in Transition
The Transatlantic Indian succeeds admirably in surveying the transatlantic exchanges between Native Americans and British readers and writers during the long nineteenth century.
— Siohban Carroll
Literature and History
This beautifully researched project contributes a sweeping synthesis, but its virtues go much farther. . . . Flint pulls off the tricky combination of a tight argument with an exploratory format. Delicate readings of slippery texts will impress literary scholars, while historians will appreciate the book's temporal and cultural scope and its broad range of prosaic and canonical sources. . . . [T]his is a book to relish, ruminate over, and revisit.
— Rebecca R. Noel
Review of English Studies
The claims of The Transatlantic Indian are superbly documented by extensive notes and bibliographical data; it is nicely illustrated by materials Flint actually analyses; and the book, as an artifact, is presented with the high production values characteristic of Princeton University Press.
— Mick Gidley
European Legacy
[I]ts pages, sentences, and images demands fullest attention, appealing at once to our senses, emotions and minds.
— Cyana Leahy-Dios
Journal of American Ethnic History
The historical scholarship on white attitudes toward Native Americans is prolific, but with The Transatlantic Indian, Kate Flint refreshes this familiar genre with a transnational approach to Anglo-Indian relations.
— David A. Gerber
19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century

It is in any case no surprise to report that Flint's readings of her sources are always searching and nuanced. The book is also very light on jargon; it is too intellectually confident for that. This will be a major text in the burgeoning field of transantlantic studies. It offers a distinctive portrait of Victorian culture that we have not seen before.
— Rohan McWilliam
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World
This is a very informed volume that uses an impressive range of literary texts in order to chart a history of representation and interaction. The crucial intervention of Flint's project is in how it implicates Britain in narratives and discourses regarding Native Americans, in a move that demonstrates the long and intimate links that become forged between an empire and its colony.
— Hum
19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century - Rohan McWilliam
It is in any case no surprise to report that Flint's readings of her sources are always searching and nuanced. The book is also very light on jargon; it is too intellectually confident for that. This will be a major text in the burgeoning field of transantlantic studies. It offers a distinctive portrait of Victorian culture that we have not seen before.
Journal of Transatlantic Studies - Mandy Cooper
Kate Flint's scholarly work is a fascinating and ground-breaking study of the Indian as both imagined in literature and visible in transatlantic encounters and exchanges. . . . Her extensive knowledge of both Victorian society and culture and tribal histories and cultures is evident throughout the work. . . . Flint's work establishes fruitful links with recent scholarship and debates which have successfully placed the Indian in a transatlantic perspective.
English Literature in Transition - Siohban Carroll
The Transatlantic Indian succeeds admirably in surveying the transatlantic exchanges between Native Americans and British readers and writers during the long nineteenth century.
Literature and History - Rebecca R. Noel
This beautifully researched project contributes a sweeping synthesis, but its virtues go much farther. . . . Flint pulls off the tricky combination of a tight argument with an exploratory format. Delicate readings of slippery texts will impress literary scholars, while historians will appreciate the book's temporal and cultural scope and its broad range of prosaic and canonical sources. . . . [T]his is a book to relish, ruminate over, and revisit.
Review of English Studies - Mick Gidley
The claims of The Transatlantic Indian are superbly documented by extensive notes and bibliographical data; it is nicely illustrated by materials Flint actually analyses; and the book, as an artifact, is presented with the high production values characteristic of Princeton University Press.
European Legacy - Cyana Leahy-Dios
[I]ts pages, sentences, and images demands fullest attention, appealing at once to our senses, emotions and minds.
Journal of American Ethnic History - David A. Gerber
The historical scholarship on white attitudes toward Native Americans is prolific, but with The Transatlantic Indian, Kate Flint refreshes this familiar genre with a transnational approach to Anglo-Indian relations.
From the Publisher
"This extraordinarily capacious, academically sound study broadens the field of Victorian studies."—Choice

"It is in any case no surprise to report that Flint's readings of her sources are always searching and nuanced. The book is also very light on jargon; it is too intellectually confident for that. This will be a major text in the burgeoning field of transantlantic studies. It offers a distinctive portrait of Victorian culture that we have not seen before."—Rohan McWilliam, 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century

"Kate Flint's scholarly work is a fascinating and ground-breaking study of the Indian as both imagined in literature and visible in transatlantic encounters and exchanges. . . . Her extensive knowledge of both Victorian society and culture and tribal histories and cultures is evident throughout the work. . . . Flint's work establishes fruitful links with recent scholarship and debates which have successfully placed the Indian in a transatlantic perspective."—Mandy Cooper, Journal of Transatlantic Studies

"The Transatlantic Indian succeeds admirably in surveying the transatlantic exchanges between Native Americans and British readers and writers during the long nineteenth century."—Siohban Carroll, English Literature in Transition

"This beautifully researched project contributes a sweeping synthesis, but its virtues go much farther. . . . Flint pulls off the tricky combination of a tight argument with an exploratory format. Delicate readings of slippery texts will impress literary scholars, while historians will appreciate the book's temporal and cultural scope and its broad range of prosaic and canonical sources. . . . [T]his is a book to relish, ruminate over, and revisit."—Rebecca R. Noel, Literature and History

"The claims of The Transatlantic Indian are superbly documented by extensive notes and bibliographical data; it is nicely illustrated by materials Flint actually analyses; and the book, as an artifact, is presented with the high production values characteristic of Princeton University Press."—Mick Gidley, Review of English Studies

"[I]ts pages, sentences, and images demands fullest attention, appealing at once to our senses, emotions and minds."—Cyana Leahy-Dios, European Legacy

"The historical scholarship on white attitudes toward Native Americans is prolific, but with The Transatlantic Indian, Kate Flint refreshes this familiar genre with a transnational approach to Anglo-Indian relations."—David A. Gerber, Journal of American Ethnic History

"This is a very informed volume that uses an impressive range of literary texts in order to chart a history of representation and interaction. The crucial intervention of Flint's project is in how it implicates Britain in narratives and discourses regarding Native Americans, in a move that demonstrates the long and intimate links that become forged between an empire and its colony."—Hum, Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World

"[A]s is characteristic of the best scholarly surveys, Flint's book marks out the territory that future scholars will need to subject to ever finer scrutiny."—Joshua David Bellin, Modern Philology

Modern Philology - Joshua David Bellin
[A]s is characteristic of the best scholarly surveys, Flint's book marks out the territory that future scholars will need to subject to ever finer scrutiny.
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World - Hum

This is a very informed volume that uses an impressive range of literary texts in order to chart a history of representation and interaction. The crucial intervention of Flint's project is in how it implicates Britain in narratives and discourses regarding Native Americans, in a move that demonstrates the long and intimate links that become forged between an empire and its colony.
Choice
This extraordinarily capacious, academically sound study broadens the field of Victorian studies.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691131207
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 11/17/2008
  • Pages: 394
  • Sales rank: 1,189,607
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Kate Flint is professor of English at Rutgers University. She is the author of "The Victorians and the Visual Imagination" and "The Woman Reader, 1837-1914".

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Table of Contents

List of Illustrations ix
Preface xi
Chapter One: Figuring America 1
Chapter Two: The Romantic Indian 26
Chapter Three: "Brought to the Zenith of Civilization": Indians in England in the 1840s 53
Chapter Four: Sentiment and Anger: British Women Writers and Native Americans 86
Chapter Five: Is the Indian an American? 112
Chapter Six: Savagery and Nationalism: Native Americans and Popular Fiction 136
Chapter Seven: Indians and the Politics of Gender 167
Chapter Eight: Indians and Missionaries 192
Chapter Nine: Buffalo Bill's Wild West and English Identity 226
Chapter Ten: Indian Frontiers 256
Conclusion: Indians, Modernity, and History 288
Notes 297
Bibliography 33

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