Transatlantic Literary Studies: A Reader

Overview

This groundbreaking volume is the first to define the emergent field of transatlantic literary studies. It brings together a wide range of material to explore the theoretical and literary possibilities of the transatlantic world as an arena for textual and intellectual exchange.

In their introduction, the editors suggest ways in which the transatlantic paradigm offers renewed potential for literary study that for too long has been tied to the ideological and political ...

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Overview

This groundbreaking volume is the first to define the emergent field of transatlantic literary studies. It brings together a wide range of material to explore the theoretical and literary possibilities of the transatlantic world as an arena for textual and intellectual exchange.

In their introduction, the editors suggest ways in which the transatlantic paradigm offers renewed potential for literary study that for too long has been tied to the ideological and political requirements of the nation-state. The Reader provides accessible, annotated examples of theoretical frameworks that provoke further scholarly inquiry and important works of literary criticism that demonstrate different possibilities of comparative analysis. This important compilation represents and promotes the conceptualization of American culture within the broader context of transatlantic activity.

Johns Hopkins University Press

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What People Are Saying

Robert Lawson-Peebles

Recent events in the global political arena have led to a revaluation in the study of the Atlantic literatures and cultures. Manning and Taylor's reader brings together a wide range of criticism, from René Wellek to Wai Chee Dimock, to show that our understanding of those literatures and cultures is freshly derived yet firmly rooted. The book has a substantial introductory chapter and is shrewdly organised into six theoretical and thematic groups, each given a perceptive prologue. It will be required reading for years to come.

Robert Lawson-Peebles, University of Exeter

Joel Pace

Here is a reader that culls the most important, brilliant, and groundbreaking pieces of literary criticism on a comparatist approach to American Studies and offers them to readers in one binding. It is a significant, timely critical achievement, and it is certain to be praised by students and scholars alike.

Joel Pace, University of Wisconsin

Joel Pace

Here is a reader that culls the most important, brilliant, and groundbreaking pieces of literary criticism on a comparatist approach to American Studies and offers them to readers in one binding. It is a significant, timely critical achievement, and it is certain to be praised by students and scholars alike.

Robert Lawson-Peebles

Recent events in the global political arena have led to a revaluation in the study of the Atlantic literatures and cultures. Manning and Taylor's reader brings together a wide range of criticism, from René Wellek to Wai Chee Dimock, to show that our understanding of those literatures and cultures is freshly derived yet firmly rooted. The book has a substantial introductory chapter and is shrewdly organised into six theoretical and thematic groups, each given a perceptive prologue. It will be required reading for years to come.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780801887314
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Publication date: 4/28/2007
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 6.80 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Susan Manning is Grierson Professor of English and director of the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh. Andrew Taylor is a lecturer in American Literature at the University of Edinburgh.

Johns Hopkins University Press

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Table of Contents


Note on the Texts     ix
Acknowledgements     x
Publisher's Acknowledgements     xi
Introduction: What is Transatlantic Literary Studies?     1
The Nation and Cosmopolitanism
Introduction     17
'Copywriting American History: International Copyright and the Periodization of the Nineteenth Century'   Claudia Stokes     23
'The Transnational Turn: Rediscovering American Studies in a Wider World'   Robert A. Gross     31
'Nineteenth-Century United States Literary Culture and Transnationality'   John Carlos Rowe     35
'National Narratives, Postnational Narration'   Donald E. Pease     39
'Transnationalism and Classic American Literature'   Paul Giles     44
'The Limits of Cosmopolitanism and the Case for Translation'   David Simpson     53
'Between Empires: Frances Calderon de la Barca's Life in Mexico'   Amy Kaplan   Nina Gerassi-Navarro     58
'Principles of a History of World Literature'   Pascale Casanova     65
Theories and Practice of Comparative Literature
Introduction     75
'General, Comparative, and National Literature'   Rene Wellek   Austin Warren     80
'Notes Towards a Comparison Between Europeanand American Romanticism'   Tony Tanner     82
'English Romanticism, American Romanticism: What's the Difference?'   J. Hillis Miller     89
'Cultural Time in England and America'   Robert Weisbuch     97
'Nature and Walden'   Richard Gravil     105
'On Beginning to Tell a "Best-Kept Secret"'   Margaret McFadden     111
'Network Analysis: A Reappraisal'   Jeremy Boissevain     115
Imperialism and the Postcolonial
Introduction     121
'Prospero and Caliban'   Peter Hulme     126
'Cultural Identity and Diaspora'   Stuart Hall     131
'The Black Atlantic as a Counterculture of Modernity'   Paul Gilroy     139
'American Literary Emergence as a Postcolonial Phenomenon'   Lawrence Buell     147
'European Pedigrees/African Contagions: Nationality, Narrative, and Community in Tutuola, Achebe, and Reed'   James Snead     156
'Deep Time: American Literature and World History'   Wai Chee Dimock     160
Translation
Introduction     167
'The Task of the Translator'   Walter Benjamin     172
'On Linguistic Aspects of Translation'   Roman Jakobson     182
'The Hermeneutic Motion'   George Steiner     184
'The Tropics of Translation'   Douglas Robinson     189
'Gender and the Metaphorics of Translation'   Lori Chamberlain     194
'Jack Spicer's After Lorca: Translation as Decomposition'   Daniel Katz     201
'The French Caribbeanization of Phillis Wheatley: A Poetics of Anticolonialism'   Anna Brickhouse     207
Style and Genre
Introduction     215
'Eloquence and Translation'   Eric Cheyfitz     221
'Introduction: Rhizome'   Gilles Deleuze   Felix Guattari     226
'Traveling Genres'   Margaret Cohen     232
'Introduction: History, Memory, and Performance'   Joseph Roach     236
'Romance and Rational Orthodoxy'   Michael Davitt Bell     249
'The Failure of Genre Criticism'   Nicolaus Mills     256
'Empire and Occasional Conformity: David Fordyce's Complete British Letter-Writer'   Eve Tavor Bannet     263
'The Americanization of Clarissa'   Leonard Tennenhouse     272
Travel
Introduction     281
'Reflections on Exile'   Edward Said     285
'Ethno-Graphy: Speech, or the Space of the Other: Jean de Lery'   Michel de Certeau     291
'Introduction' to Sea Changes   Stephen Fender     298
'The Rewards of Travel'   William Stowe     303
'Introduction' to Imperial Eyes, and 'Humboldt as Transculturator'   Mary Louise Pratt     312
'Travel Writing and its Theory'   Mary Baine Campbell     316
Glossary of Terms     329
Index     341
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