Transfer Agreement

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The Transfer Agreement is the stunning, compassionate account of the "deal with the devil" that saved 60,000 Jews from the Holocaust. The deal was made in desperation in 1933 between the Jewish leadership in Palestine and the Third Reich. The terms: that the Jewish-led boycott of German goods would cease in return for the transfer of German Jews to the Holy Land. Eventually one-tenth of Germany's Jews were saved, thus helping to form the seedbed of modern Israel.. "Edwin Black reveals for the first time the ...
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1st Edition, Fine/Fine- Slight crease on rear flap top fore-edge corner, o.w. clean, bright and tight. No ink names, tears, chips, foxing, etc. Price unclipped. ISBN 0025111302

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Overview

The Transfer Agreement is the stunning, compassionate account of the "deal with the devil" that saved 60,000 Jews from the Holocaust. The deal was made in desperation in 1933 between the Jewish leadership in Palestine and the Third Reich. The terms: that the Jewish-led boycott of German goods would cease in return for the transfer of German Jews to the Holy Land. Eventually one-tenth of Germany's Jews were saved, thus helping to form the seedbed of modern Israel.. "Edwin Black reveals for the first time the inside details of the controversial pact and recreates the drama: the personalities, the cliff-hanger negotiations, and the anguish of world Jewry over their choice. And Black does more. He provides a true understanding of Israel's founding and the heartbreaking realities of the Jew's plight in Hitler's Europe.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
This update of the award-winning 1984 edition by a son of Holocaust survivors relates the drama of the little-known, controversial 1933 Zionist pact with Nazi Germany allowing the transfer of 60,000 Jews and $100 million to Jewish Palestine in exchange for halting support for a worldwide anti-Nazi boycott. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780025111301
  • Publisher: Scribner
  • Publication date: 5/1/1984
  • Pages: 430

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  • Posted November 12, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    .....tragic history revisited....,

    Researchers have recently unearthed `directives' sent from Heinrich Himmler to Dachau, and Mauthausen concentration camps to the effect that all inmates were to be bathed in showers providing insecticides, their heads cleared of hair, their heavy garments that bore Wool Collars were to be burned outright. The reason for such directives was to prevent lice, and leprosy from spreading among all other inmate prisoners. <BR/><BR/>Gypsies, Polish, Slavs, Soviets (Christians and Jews) who had been incarcerated during the war and routed into the five main Concentration Camps, {which had been established throughout the years 1933 to 1939}, were in their majority suffering lice parasite, notably on youngsters. Himmler ruled "they should be showered in insecticides twice per week in order to remove the nits attached to their hair - difficult to remove without specialized products." <BR/><BR/>Many inmates were homosexuals' prisoners of war, suffering from venereal diseases - transmissible. This parasite was widely spreading at the time Germany was lacking enough doctors to take care of the prevention process or even to guard against casual means of transmission. <BR/><BR/>Most doctors were preoccupied with war related engagements; on their priority list was first and foremost to take care of injuries from battles, research, and the last was to worry about concentration camps per se, unless in absolute emergencies like `fear that certain virus might not be contained and would be causing widespread damage'. <BR/><BR/>In very few pages of this book did the author speak of Concentration Camps - dispersed on ten pages? Even there he did it casually in the context that ""workers were rushed to construct a mysterious political concentration camp at a pastoral village called Dachau...."" """Every train entering Denmark was crowded with German Jewish refugees..""" indicative that the `Transfer' from Germany to Palestine (in transit through neutral Europe - France had fallen by then) gives credence to this book. <BR/><BR/>Perhaps written books on the `Pogrom' will soon be revisited and be traced back with more up to date material on these most fateful human tragedies of WWII.

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