Transformation of Ireland

Overview

"In 1900, Ireland was a restless, impoverished, neglected corner of the British Empire. By 2000, it had become the "Celtic Tiger" of Europe. How did this happen? This landmark book by one of today's most exciting young historians sets out to give a full account of what it was like to grow up and live in twentieth-century Ireland, and it is the first comprehensive social, political, cultural, intellectual, and economic survey of that Irish century." Diarmaid Ferriter weaves together the many threads that make up this complex story - from the drama ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (24) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $23.00   
  • Used (19) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

"In 1900, Ireland was a restless, impoverished, neglected corner of the British Empire. By 2000, it had become the "Celtic Tiger" of Europe. How did this happen? This landmark book by one of today's most exciting young historians sets out to give a full account of what it was like to grow up and live in twentieth-century Ireland, and it is the first comprehensive social, political, cultural, intellectual, and economic survey of that Irish century." Diarmaid Ferriter weaves together the many threads that make up this complex story - from the drama of its politics to the "hidden pasts" revealed in memoirs and previously unpublished sources - to tell the history of a bitterly divided society. Ferriter focuses on the social and cultural aspects, the changing role of women and the family, and relationships with Europe and the U.K., alongside the political and religious divisions that dominated headlines throughout the century. With its grand ambition and scope, along with its innovative use of sources, The Transformation Of Ireland makes a strong claim as the definitive account of contemporary Ireland.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This book isn't a political history of 20th-century Ireland; it's more a chronicle of the social reaction to the events that shaped that century. Perhaps the most interesting part covers the last 40 years of the century. In 1959 the brilliant Se n Lemass finally became prime minister and set the tone for the future by finding bright, young ministers and letting them run their departments without interference. The dark side of Irish life is also explored: the church/state role in the Magdalen laundries, cleric pedophilia and other secrets that have come to light in the last decade. And a very deep feminist streak informs the text, from the War of Independence, to the fight for birth control in the 1970s, and the election of two women presidents in the last 15 years. No stone of social significance is left unturned, be it the problems of the Traveling People (Gypsies), crooked politicians or the needs of the urban poor. This book can be a rogues' gallery at times and a good knowledge of Irish history is helpful but not necessary. Ferriter (coauthor, The Irish Famine), a lecturer in history at St. Patrick's College, Dublin City University, has written an informative, funny, at times derisive book that takes a fresh approach to 20th-century Ireland. (Oct.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Foreign Affairs
At a time when the economic development of Ireland is widely seen as one of the great achievements of the European Union, this enormous history of Ireland since 1900 by a young Irish historian not only succeeds in showing vividly the struggles and divisions that have marked the country's turbulent story; it also sheds light on important areas neglected by earlier historians — the flaws of an educational system dominated by the church, the nature of the family, the many "double standards in relation to class," and the scope and causes of alcoholism and acute poverty, among others. Ferriter's use of archives made available only recently and his interest in social issues (which is not to say that he neglects the cultural dimension) give this history considerable depth and allow Ferriter to present, in a matter-of-fact way, the dark realities that the economic takeoff and the integration into Europe (to which he devotes only a few pages) have not eliminated. Thus, the book is a sharp reminder of the gap between economic modernization and cultural and social practices and institutions that resist and often distort change. It is also a call to Irish scholars and citizens to conduct more self-examination and to face unpleasant truths, past and present.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781585676811
  • Publisher: Overlook Press, The
  • Publication date: 11/28/2005
  • Pages: 884
  • Sales rank: 1,121,990
  • Product dimensions: 6.32 (w) x 9.18 (h) x 2.23 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)