Transforming Museums in the Twenty-first Century [NOOK Book]

Overview

In his book, Graham Black argues that museums must transform themselves if they are to remain relevant to 21st century audiences – and this root and branch change would be necessary whether or not museums faced a funding crisis. It is the result of the impact of new technologies and the rapid societal developments that we are all a part of, and applies not just to museums but to all arts bodies and to other agents of mass communication.


Through comment, practical examples and ...

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Transforming Museums in the Twenty-first Century

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Overview

In his book, Graham Black argues that museums must transform themselves if they are to remain relevant to 21st century audiences – and this root and branch change would be necessary whether or not museums faced a funding crisis. It is the result of the impact of new technologies and the rapid societal developments that we are all a part of, and applies not just to museums but to all arts bodies and to other agents of mass communication.


Through comment, practical examples and truly inspirational case studies, this book allows the reader to build a picture of the transformed 21st century museum in practice. Such a museum is focused on developing its audiences as regular users. It is committed to participation and collaboration. It brings together on-site, online and mobile provision and, through social media, builds meaningful relationships with its users. It is not restricted by its walls or opening hours, but reaches outwards in partnership with its communities and with other agencies, including schools. It is a haven for families learning together. And at its heart lies prolonged user engagement with collections, and the conversations and dialogues that these inspire.


The book is filled to the brim with practical examples. It features:




  • an introduction that focuses on the challenges that face museums in the 21st century



  • an analysis of population trends and their likely impact on museums



  • boxes showing ideas, models and planning suggestions to guide development



  • examples and case studies illustrating practice in both large and small museums



  • an up-to-date bibliography of landmark research, including numerous websites


Sitting alongside Graham Black’s previous book, The Engaging Museum, we now have a clear vision of a museum of the future that engages, stimulates and inspires the publics it serves, and plays an active role in promoting tolerance and understanding within and between communities.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781136515774
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 3/12/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 1,373,717
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Graham Black is Reader in Public History and Heritage Management, at Nottingham Trent University. He is also a consultant Heritage Interpreter, and exhibitions on which he has acted as Interpretive Consultant have won the first UK £100,000 Museum Prize (2003) and been on the final shortlist for the Prize (2007), as well as winning its predecessor the Gulbenkian Prize, a Museum of the Year Award, the Special Judges Prize at the Interpret Britain Awards and the English Tourist Board’s "England for Excellence" Tourist Attraction of the Year Award. He is a Fellow of the Association for Heritage Interpretation (UK). He is the author of The Engaging Museum (Routledge, 2005).

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Table of Contents

Introduction : meeting the demands placed on the twenty-first century museum 1
Sect. 1 Museum audiences : their nature, needs and expectations 7
1 'Traditional' museum audiences : a quantitative and qualitative analysis 9
2 Developing new audiences 46
Sect. 2 Operating for quality 75
3 Stimulating the visit 77
4 Visitor services : operating for quality 96
Sect. 3 Learning in museums 121
5 Museums and lifelong learning 123
6 Use of museums by schools 157
Sect. 4 Planned to engage : using interpretation to develop museum displays and associated services 177
7 Applying the principles of interpretation to museum display 179
8 Interpretive master planning 211
9 Concept development for museum galleries 239
10 The engaging museum 266
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