Translating Baudelaire

Overview

"This book is the record of an apprenticeship in translating Baudelaire, and in translating poetry more generally. Re-assessing the translator's task and art, Clive Scott explores various theoretical approaches as he goes in search of his own style of translation. But, equally, he undertakes detailed analyses of the seventeen poems of which he offers renderings, so that the book is as much an evaluation of Baudelaire's writing as it is of the available ways of re-imagining that writing in another language." "As the apprenticeship unfolds, Scott
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Overview

"This book is the record of an apprenticeship in translating Baudelaire, and in translating poetry more generally. Re-assessing the translator's task and art, Clive Scott explores various theoretical approaches as he goes in search of his own style of translation. But, equally, he undertakes detailed analyses of the seventeen poems of which he offers renderings, so that the book is as much an evaluation of Baudelaire's writing as it is of the available ways of re-imagining that writing in another language." "As the apprenticeship unfolds, Scott also addresses two other questions which translation studies have left relatively neglected: What form should the criticism of translation take, if the critic is to do justice to the translator's project? How can a translator persuade readers to respond to a translation as a text with its own creative dynamic and expressive ambitions? These two questions motivate the answer that the book itself provides: the presentation of translations not as isolated products, but as texts embedded in a discourse which traces their emergence." "Translating Baudelaire is thus an experiment in 'contextualised' translation, where the translator's visibility is radically increased, where translation is seen as a kind of spiritual autobiography, where the relationships between translation and criticism, translation and reading, are acted out. The book ends with a translation of Baudelaire's 'Le Voyage', which is accompanied by a justification of free verse as a translational medium and as the goal of Scott's stylistic search."--BOOK JACKET.
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Editorial Reviews

Times Literary Supplement
Clive Scott’s Translating Baudelaire offers exhilarating perspectives on the practice of (verse translation. Imbued with a postmodernist sense of the mobility and provisionality of text, he seeks to liberate the translator from what he calls pre-postmodernist anxieties . . . His unrivalled ability to analyse French verse and his remarkable talents as a wordsmith, indeed as a poet, combine to produce compelling renderings of some of Baudelaire’s finest verse. His book is an intoxicating invitation to jouissance, promising redemption from a state of punishment, in which we are compelled to reiterate our sense of loss. But after he has explicated his own, fine translation of Le Voyage—his choices of form and lexis, his intercutting (intertextually inspired additions and allusions—one may be left with the residual sense of having been lured into an artificial paradise, a pre-postlapsarian realm as it were, in which the translator has conscious intentions which explain his text. One had thought such an author dead.
Booknews
This book is the record of an apprenticeship in translating Baudelaire, and in translating poetry more generally. Re-assessing the translator's task and art, Scott (European literature, University of East Anglia) explores the various theoretical approaches as he goes in search of his own style of translation. But, equally, he undertakes detailed analysis of the seventeen poems of which he offers renderings. Hence, the book is as much an evaluation of Baudelaire's writing as it is of the available ways of re-imagining that writing in another language. Distributed by David Brown Book Co. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780859896580
  • Publisher: University of Exeter Press
  • Publication date: 1/28/2000
  • Series: European Studies
  • Pages: 287
  • Product dimensions: 9.20 (w) x 6.20 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author


Clive Scott is professor emeritus of European literature at the University of East Anglia.
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Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter One: A Defence of Foreignizing Translation

Chapter Two: Translating Rhythm

Chapter Three: The Dead Language of Translation

Chapter Four: Translating and Co-authoring

Chapter Five: Translation and Transformation

Chapter Six: 'Shot' and 'Reverse Shot' Translation

Chapter Seven: The Route through Prose

Chapter Eight: The Criticisms of Translation

Chapter Nine: Translation and Intercutting

Conclusion

Appendix I: 'Translations' of translations of 'La Cloche fêlée'

Appendix II: Texts of Verlaine's 'Nevermore', Elliot's 'Nevermore' and Baudelaire's 'Le Balcon'

Appendix III: Text of Baudelaire's 'Assommons les pauvres!'

Appendix IV: Text of Baudelaire's 'Le Voyage'

Bibliography

Index

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