Translating Feminisms in China

Overview

This volume, which brings together articles by scholars and activists in China, Japan, Canada and the US in multiple disciplines, seeks to illuminate the problems and possibilities involved in translating feminism from the metropolitan ‘West’ to a locale rife with its own ideas about gender, class, body and sexuality.


  • Showcases the centrality of gender in the formation of...
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Overview

This volume, which brings together articles by scholars and activists in China, Japan, Canada and the US in multiple disciplines, seeks to illuminate the problems and possibilities involved in translating feminism from the metropolitan ‘West’ to a locale rife with its own ideas about gender, class, body and sexuality.


  • Showcases the centrality of gender in the formation of modern China
  • Demonstrates the extent to which translated feminisms — whatever they mean — have transformed the terms in which modern Chinese understand their own subjectivities and histories
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781405161701
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 12/4/2007
  • Series: Gender and History Special Issues Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 264
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 0.55 (d)

Meet the Author

Dorothy Ko, a native of Hong Kong, is Professor of Chinese History at Barnard College, Columbia University. She is the author of the recent monograph, Cinderella’s Sisters: A Revisionist History of Footbinding (2005).

Wang Zheng is an Associate Professor of Women’s Studies and Associate Research Scientist of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She is the author of Women in the Chinese Enlightenment: Oral and Textual Histories (1999) and co-editor with Xueping Zhong and Bai Di of Some of Us: Chinese Women Growing Up in the Mao Era (2002).

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Table of Contents


Notes on Contributors     vii
Introduction: Translating Feminisms in China   Dorothy Ko   Wang Zheng     1
Concepts of Women's Rights in Modern China   Mizuyo Sudo     13
Translating the New Woman: Chinese Feminists View the West, 1905-15   Carol. C. Chin     35
Womanhood, Motherhood and Biology: The Early Phases of The Ladies' Journal, 1915-25   Yung-Chen Chiang     70
Nationalist and Feminist Discourses on Jianmei (Robust Beauty) during China's 'National Crisis' in the 1930s   Yunxiang Gao     104
Making a Great Leap Forward? The Politics of Women's Liberation in Maoist China   Kimberley Ens Manning     138
'The Silver Flower Contest': Rural Women in 1950s China and the Gendered Division of Labour   Gao Xiaoxian     164
Rethinking the 'Iron Girls': Gender and Labour during the Chinese Cultural Revolution   Jin Yihong     188
Who Is a Feminist? Understanding the Ambivalence towards Shanghai Baby, 'Body Writing' and Feminism in Post-Women's Liberation China   Xueping Zhong     215
Index     247
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