Translation Goes to the Movies

Translation Goes to the Movies

5.0 1
by Michael Cronin
     
 

ISBN-10: 0415422868

ISBN-13: 9780415422864

Pub. Date: 08/28/2008

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

This highly accessible introduction to translation theory, written by a leading author in the field, uses the genre of film to bring the main themes in translation to life. Through analyzing films as diverse as the Marx Brothers' A Night at the Opera, The Star Wars Trilogies and Lost in Translation, the reader is encouraged to think about

Overview

This highly accessible introduction to translation theory, written by a leading author in the field, uses the genre of film to bring the main themes in translation to life. Through analyzing films as diverse as the Marx Brothers' A Night at the Opera, The Star Wars Trilogies and Lost in Translation, the reader is encouraged to think about both issues and problems of translation as they are played out on the screen and issues of filmic representation through examining the translation dimension of specific films. In highlighting how translation has featured in both mainstream commercial and arthouse films over the years, Cronin shows how translation has been a concern of filmmakers dealing with questions of culture, identity, conflict and representation. This book is a lively and accessible text for translation theory courses and offers a new and largely unexplored approach to topics of identity and representation on screen. Translation Goes to the Movies will be of interest to those on translation studies and film studies courses.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780415422864
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
08/28/2008
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
168
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.20(d)

Table of Contents

List of film stills viii

Acknowledgements ix

Introduction: the full picture x

1 Translation: the screen test 1

2 The frontiers of translation: Stagecoach to Dances with Wolves 29

3 Translation howlers: A Night at the Opera to Borat 54

4 The long journey home: Lost in Translation to Babel 81

5 The empire talks back: translation in Star Wars 108

Bibliography 134

Index 140

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Translation Goes to the Movies 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
D_Bannon More than 1 year ago
`Part of the excitement of research in this domain,' wrote Michael Cronin, `is that so much remains to be done in terms of uncovering the representation of translation in world cinema.' Cronin filled his book with that excitement. He chose film as example and result of translation theory and illustrates important concepts within that context. The material is accessible and of keen interest to translation professionals or those concerned with questions of culture and identity in the globalization of cinema. Cronin writes with authority. His prose is crisp and clean as he wrestles with extraordinarily challenging issues. He does not decry globalization as the end of diversity--rather, he seems to revel in its possibilities for exploring multi-cultural cinema traditions. That sense of genuine optimism adds a refreshing dimension to an already intriguing text. Casual readers may find Cronin's style entertaining, though the material is highly specialized. Linguists and translators will doubtless find his theories sound and his discussion of issues in global cinema well worth reading. D. Bannon is author of The Elements of Subtitles: A Practical Guide to the Art of Dialogue, Character, Context, Tone and Style in Subtitling (ISBN-10: 0557130727; ISBN-13: 9780557130726).