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Translations

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Overview

The action takes place in late August 1833 at a hedge-school in the townland of Baile Beag, an Irish-speaking community in County Donegal. In a nearby field camps a recently arrived detachment of the Royal Engineers, making the first Ordnance Survey. For the purposes of cartography, the local Gaelic place names have to be recorded and rendered into English. In examining the effects of this operation on the lives of a small group, Brian Friel skillfully reveals the far-reaching personal and cultural effects of an ...

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Overview

The action takes place in late August 1833 at a hedge-school in the townland of Baile Beag, an Irish-speaking community in County Donegal. In a nearby field camps a recently arrived detachment of the Royal Engineers, making the first Ordnance Survey. For the purposes of cartography, the local Gaelic place names have to be recorded and rendered into English. In examining the effects of this operation on the lives of a small group, Brian Friel skillfully reveals the far-reaching personal and cultural effects of an action which is at first sight purely administrative.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Translations is a modern classic. It engages the intellect as well as the heart, and achieves a profound political and philosophical resonance through the detailed examination of individual lives, of particular people in particular place and time."—Daily Telegraph

"This is Brian Friel's finest play, his most deeply thought and felt, the most deeply involved with Ireland but also the most universal: haunting and hard, lyrical and erudite, bitter and forgiving, both praise and lament."—Sunday Times

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780571117420
  • Publisher: Faber and Faber
  • Publication date: 3/16/1995
  • Series: Faber Paperbacks
  • Edition number: 70
  • Pages: 72
  • Sales rank: 203,588
  • Product dimensions: 5.03 (w) x 7.79 (h) x 0.28 (d)

Meet the Author

Brian Friel was born in Omagh, County Tyrone (Northern Ireland) in 1929. He received his college education in Derry, Maynooth and Belfast and taught at various schools in and around Derry from 1950 to 1960. He is the author of many plays that have taken their place in the canon of Irish Literature, including Philadelphia, Here I Come! (1964), Lovers (1967), Translations (1980), The Communication Cord (1982), and Dancing at Lughnasa (1990). In 1980 he founded the touring theatre company, Field Day, with Stephen Rea.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2004

    Why isn't there an audio tape?

    Brian Friel 's play is certainly a masterpiece that all students of English, native or foreign, who are interested in languages must read. However, it is most strange that in this day and age when most published works have their audio versions accompanying them there isn't apparently one for 'Translations'. I, for one who am French, would certainly appreciate listening to the play simply because of all the Gaelic names whose pronounciation must be known for the play to be enjoyed thoroughly; it'd certainly make sense. Bernard

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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