Translations of the Gospel Back into Tongues

Translations of the Gospel Back into Tongues

by C. D. Wright
     
 
In an acclaimed collection of taut, sensual poetry, award-winning poet C.D. Wright interweaves familiar, coloquial speech with strikingly inventive language, leaving each poem a distinctive entity, yet interconnected by linked metaphors and images.

Overview

In an acclaimed collection of taut, sensual poetry, award-winning poet C.D. Wright interweaves familiar, coloquial speech with strikingly inventive language, leaving each poem a distinctive entity, yet interconnected by linked metaphors and images.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“CD Wright’s is a poetry of Southern mountain vision brought to the streets in a language of brilliant synaesthesia, colloquial warmth and laconic wit. These are unpredictable poems of jazz, dreams, domestic violence and ‘what is written on mirrors in Louisville.’ The territory is uniquely Wright’s, but borders that of James Agee and Diane Arbus: common, strange and filled with risk. Throughout these poems there is a saxophone playing and a poignant voice making sense.” — Carolyn Forché

“Images rise from these poems like startled birds flushed from the field. What we have is the courage of a writer with and against the sad voices, and that original language of a faith in faith. This is the fluent reverie, a long drug of feeling, taking us to places and things seen clearly and with grace.” — Norman Dubie

“The dramatic and emotional vitality of CD Wright’s language, the authenticity and daring of her tone and speech, make her poems, one after the other, surprising, outrageous, exciting, moving, funny. She incorporates naturally the bitterness, loneliness and humor of the world and tradition of the blues—passionate, disappointed, violent, awry. Her voice and her talent are genuine and unmistakable. They give heart.” — W. S. Merwin

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
With her opening words, Wright ( String Light ) introduces ``the body, alive, not dead but dormant.'' A few lines later, the body is asked to take off its panties. This sensual image of the would-be naked female pervades the volume, as the poet deftly uses repetition and slight variation to keep readers attentive to what might otherwise be a difficult book to follow. The work is predominantly in prose-poem form, and some of the clearest insights into Wright's process are contained within structured line breaks. Thus she looks longingly back at the old days, when bodies were naked, and insists that the same body that had refused to remove its panties ``has the right to remain naked.'' The body becomes pregnant; the moment of giving birth is hauntingly articulated: ``pressure of rock on the chest . . . tremendous fall of rock.'' Later, the nondescript voice says there was ``something about'' a country drive, a gas station, clothes found in weeds--alluding to rape and murder. While the structure of this long cyclical poem demonstrates Wright's affinities with the Language poets, her work might best be understood alongside female performance artists who direct attention to the body. Photos not seen by PW. (Dec.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780873956857
Publisher:
State University of New York Press
Publication date:
06/01/1983
Series:
SUNY Poetry Series
Pages:
90

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