Transnational French Studies: Postcolonialism and Litterature-monde

Overview


The 2007 manifesto in favour of a "Litt?rature-monde en fran?ais" has generated new debates in both "francophone" and "postcolonial" studies. Praised by some for breaking down the hierarchical division between "French" and "Francophone" literatures, the manifesto has been criticized by others for recreating that division through an exoticizing vision that continues to privilege the publishing industry of the former colonial m?tropole. Does the manifesto signal the advent of a new critical paradigm destined to ...
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Overview


The 2007 manifesto in favour of a "Littérature-monde en français" has generated new debates in both "francophone" and "postcolonial" studies. Praised by some for breaking down the hierarchical division between "French" and "Francophone" literatures, the manifesto has been criticized by others for recreating that division through an exoticizing vision that continues to privilege the publishing industry of the former colonial métropole. Does the manifesto signal the advent of a new critical paradigm destined to render obsolescent those of "francophone" and/or "postcolonial" studies? Or is it simply a passing fad, a glitzy but ephemeral publicity stunt generated and promoted by writers and publishing executives vis-à-vis whom scholars and critics should maintain a skeptical distance? Does it offer an all-embracing transnational vista leading beyond the confines of postcolonialism or reintroduce an incipient form of neocolonialism even while proclaiming the end of the centre/periphery divide? In address
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Alec G. Hargreaves is the Ada Belle Winthrop-King Professor of French and director of the Winthrop-King Institute for Contemporary French and Francophone Studies at Florida State University. 

 
Charles Forsdick is the James Barrow Professor of French at the University of Liverpool. 

 
David Murphy is professor of French and postcolonial studies at the University of Stirling.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements Introduction: What Does Littérature-monde Mean for French, Francophone and Postcolonial Studies? Alec G. Hargreaves, Charles Forsdick and David Murphy From World Literature to Littérature-monde: Genre, History and the Globalization of Literature Francophone World Literature (Littérature-monde), Cosmopolitanism and Decadence: 'Citizen of the World' without the Citizen? Deborah Jenson From Weltliteratur to World Literature to Littérature-monde: The History of a Controversial Concept Typhaine Leservot Littérature-monde in the Marketplace of Ideas: A Theoretical Discussion Mounia Benalil The Postcolonial Manifesto: Partisanship, Criticism and the Performance of Change David Murphy Postcolonialism, Politics and the 'Becoming-Transnational' of French Studies 'On the Abolition of the French Department'? Exploring the Disciplinary Contexts of Littérature-monde Charles Forsdick Francophonie: Trash or Recycle? Lydie Moudileno (Not) Razing the Walls: Glissant, Trouillot and the Post-Politics o

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