Trapped: How the World Rescued 33 Miners from 2,000 Feet Below the Chilean Desert

Trapped: How the World Rescued 33 Miners from 2,000 Feet Below the Chilean Desert

4.4 10
by Marc Aronson
     
 

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The amazing story of the trapped Chilean miners and their incredible rescue that Publishers Weekly calls “a riveting, in-depth recounting of the events that held the world rapt.”

In early August 2010, the unthinkable happened when a mine collapsed in Copiano, Chile, trapping 33 miners 2,000 feet below the surface. For sixty-nine days

Overview

The amazing story of the trapped Chilean miners and their incredible rescue that Publishers Weekly calls “a riveting, in-depth recounting of the events that held the world rapt.”

In early August 2010, the unthinkable happened when a mine collapsed in Copiano, Chile, trapping 33 miners 2,000 feet below the surface. For sixty-nine days they lived on meager resources with increasingly poor air quality. When they were finally rescued, the world watched with rapt attention and rejoiced in the amazing spirit and determination of the miners. What could have been a terrible tragedy became an amazing story of survival.
     In Trapped, Marc Aronson provides the backstory behind the rescue. By tracing the psychological, physical, and environmental factors surrounding the mission, Aronson highlights the amazing technology and helping hands that made it all possible. From the Argentinean soccer players that hoped to raise morale, to NASA volunteering their expertise to come up with a plan, there was no shortage of enterprising spirit when it came to saving lives. Readers will especially appreciate the eight pages of full-color photos, timeline, glossary, notes, and more.

Editorial Reviews

Abby McGanney Nolan
In a book about Chile's famously trapped miners, you expect a certain depth of research. But it's Marc Aronson's wide, expansive view that is so refreshing. From geology and engineering to economics, mythology and religion, Aronson provides young readers with insights and analogies that can be applied far beyond what happened last year in an under-supervised Chilean mine.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
Aronson marks the one-year anniversary of the collapse of a Chilean copper mine that entombed miners for more than two months with a riveting, in-depth recounting of the events that held the world rapt. His fluid narrative begins with a brief eyewitness account of the cave-in before contextualizing the disaster. Initial chapters cover mine layout and terminology, as well as prehistoric geology (and how it helped form Chile's Atacama Desert) and the mythology of the blacksmith god, Hephaistos, who "creates the tool the hero needs, and yet he is lame, ugly, a figure of fun." Aronson (Sugar Changed the World) smartly links this ancient pejorative attitude to contemporary ones toward mining despite reliance on its products, drawing on cultural connections between the underground world and hell, Hades, etc. Twelve short chapters with photos and diagrams keep the story well-paced as it alternates between above- and below-ground scenes, detailing the heroic efforts of the trapped men, their waiting families, and their rescuers, sometimes on an hour-by-hour basis. Extensive author and source notes, a bibliography, and suggested reading leave plenty for readers to explore. Ages 8–12. (Aug.)
From the Publisher
“Aronson marks the one-year anniversary of the collapse of a Chilean copper mine that entombed miners for more than two months with a riveting, in-depth recounting of the events that held the world rapt… Twelve short chapters with photos and diagrams keep the story well-paced as it alternates between above- and below-ground scenes, detailing the heroic efforts of the trapped men, their waiting families, and their rescuers, sometimes on an hour-by-hour basis. Extensive author and source notes, a bibliography, and suggested reading leave plenty for readers to explore.”
--Publishers Weekly, June 13, 2011, *STAR

“Leave it to Aronson…. Photographs, maps, diagrams and a wild range of literary references, from Merlin to Harry Potter, Percy Jackson and Hephaistos, enliven the volume. The author uses these familiar touch points to help tell a complicated story, blending them with such highly technical information as mining machinery to keep his narrative flowing.”

--Kirkus Reviews, July 15, 2011

“Masterful storytelling brings to life a story that most think they already know; the 33 miners trapped in a Chilean copper mine for 69 days in 2010…. It was a gripping story then, and Aronson manages to make it even more exciting, more inspirational, and more personal, all by gathering pieces of the puzzle and showing how they fit together. Explanations of how the Earth’s formation and plate tectonics created the copper lines that are so valuable to the world today are a critical beginning. Filling them in with a brief history of metalworking and mining leads readers to the small, out-of-the-way mine in the Atacama Desert region. From there the story becomes as intriguing and suspenseful as any work of fiction; the miners’ struggle to survive below ground is juxtaposed with the frenzy of the work aboveground by the mine officials, the government, and many others working to save the men. Detailed descriptions of the conditions that the miners endured and how they coped paint a vivid picture of just what an ordeal it was. The global response to the disaster was enormous, with organizations, governments, and individuals from Australia, New Zealand, the United States, and Japan offering resources and expertise to find a solution. Ample source notes, black-and-white photographs, websites, and a brief explanation of research methodology round out this must-have for any library.”

--School Library Journal, August 2011, *STAR

“Much more than just a chronicle of the Chilean mining disaster of 2010, Aronson’s well-researched and riveting book gives readers the sense that they’re in the San José copper mine…Peppered with engaging quotes, the text is fluid and attention-grabbing.”

--The Horn Book Magazine, August 1, 2011, *STAR

“There’s something here to rivet just about anyone, from gearheads who follow the approaches to drilling, to humanists who empathize with the trapped men and their anxious families, to nascent activists who recognize that behind the heroics lies a corrupt, neglectful system of mine operation that endangers workers to maximize profit. Students using this title as a foundation for a written report will appreciate the annotated sourcing, timeline, index, glossary, and perhaps most important, the motherlode of useful websites. Teachers and librarians might also want to direct their students’ attention to Aronson’s appended essay on how he conducted his own Internet-based research.”

--The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, September 2011

“Aronson zips readers through a whirlwind primer….The succinct text is enhanced by a strong selection of photographs, illustrations, and diagrams, all of which help make the abstract technical issues clear. The remainder of the book is structured in a riveting day-by-day, “above-and-below” account of the rescuers’ struggle to locate survivors and bring them to the surface. Well-chosen quotes and interviews humanize the headlines, and Aronson’s dramatic writing achieves a sense of taut suspense that will captivate young readers. The extensive back matter includes biographical sketches of the miners, as well as a glossary, time line, bibliography, and list of suggested websites. Teachers will welcome this excellent title for classroom discussion, which closes with Aronson’s “How I Wrote This Book,” detailing his research methods.”

--Booklist, September 2011, *STAR

“Nonfiction the way it is meant to be—riveting, educational, and entertaining! Aronson not only does a fine job of chronicling both the physical and mental ordeals the Chilean miners faced, but explains how the problem occurred, provides historical background, and details the various participants in the rescue attempts…fascinating reading!.... Give this to students who don’t think they like nonfiction. Those that love history, geology, survival stories, scientific exploration, or even mythology will definitely enjoy it.”

--Library Media Connection, November/December 2011

“Aronson delivers a captivating account of the mine collapse…[and] crafts vivid portraits of the miners’ experiences underground, as well as those of the families and countrymen breathlessly awaiting their safe return.”

--Publishers Weekly, November 7, 2011, a "Best Books of 2011" selection

Children's Literature - Justina Engebretson
Most everyone remembers when the whole world breathlessly watched the rescue endeavors of the Chilean miners that were trapped more than 2,000 feet below the earth. Now in this nonfiction middle reader, the complete story has been brought to life by pen. This book is much more than just a historical account of the events of the Chilean miners' rescue. It is a book that explains the reason miner's undertake such dangerous jobs and sheds light on the value of metals found beneath the earth such as copper. There is a poetic tone throughout the text that paints a vivid picture of both the hope and despair that the miners and their families experienced. The book is divided up by location: events occurring either above or below the Chilean desert. This serves to contrast the experiences of both the rescuers and those in need of rescuing, yet it simultaneously weaves a connection between both groups. The photos that accompany the text serve to enhance the picture that the text paints in the reader's mind. The timeline, glossary, and list of websites at the back of the book are all very useful for students who are studying this historical event. Overall, this book is a highly engaging read that gives a fairly comprehensive account of the rescue and the experiences that the minors and their families endured. Reviewer: Justina Engebretson
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up—Masterful storytelling brings to life a story that most think they already know; the 33 miners trapped in a Chilean copper mine for 69 days in 2010. It was headline news for two months, with people glued to their televisions watching those final, dramatic rescues. It was a gripping story then, and Aronson manages to make it even more exciting, more inspirational, and more personal, all by gathering pieces of the puzzle and showing how they fit together. Explanations of how the Earth's formation and plate tectonics created the copper lines that are so valuable to the world today are a critical beginning. Filling them in with a brief history of metalworking and mining leads readers to the small, out-of-the-way mine in the Atacama Desert region. From there the story becomes as intriguing and suspenseful as any work of fiction; the miners' struggle to survive below ground is juxtaposed with the frenzy of the work aboveground by the mine officials, the government, and many others working to save the men. Detailed descriptions of the conditions that the miners endured and how they coped paint a vivid picture of just what an ordeal it was. The global response to the disaster was enormous, with organizations, governments, and individuals from Australia, New Zealand, the United States, and Japan offering resources and expertise to find a solution. Ample source notes, black-and-white and color photographs, websites, and a brief explanation of research methodology round out this must-have for any library.—Jody Kopple, Shady Hill School, Cambridge, MA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781442439818
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
08/30/2011
Sold by:
SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
168,418
File size:
6 MB
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER ONE
AUGUST 5–6

2:00 PM

Raul Villegas was driving a truck up a ramp … 1,800 feet underground … when he heard the crack and first saw the dust. Villegas was used to hauling rock out of copper mines in northern Chile, so he had often heard the creaks and moans of the angry earth. He drove on, passing a couple of miners heading down. But as he inched up the ramp he felt a wave hit his truck, “like when there is a dynamite explosion.” Glancing back, it was as if he were looking down the heart of an erupting volcano. He rushed up the endless, sharp turns of the corkscrewing mine and finally made it to the surface. He, at least, was safe. But when he described the sound and dust cloud to his bosses, no one listened.

Someone told Villegas to drive back down, into the mine.

This time he could only go so far. Some 1,200 feet down there was no longer a road, and all around him he could hear the sounds of groaning rock. He turned around and sped up, out of the darkness. Something was very wrong in the San JosÉ Mine.

9:00 PM

Six men trained to handle mine emergencies retraced the route of Villegas’s truck, daring to go down to see what had happened, to find whoever was trapped in the mine.

6:00 AM

The exhausted rescue crew returned … alone.

So began one part of a story that captured the attention of the world—bringing together everyone, from experts on outer space to drill bit manufacturers from Pennsylvania, from nutritionists to camera crews. But the real story started millions of years earlier.

© 2011 Marc Aronson

Meet the Author

Marc Aronson is the author of the critically acclaimed Sir Walter Ralegh and the Quest for El Dorado, winner of the ALA’s first Robert L. Sibert Information Book Award for nonfiction and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award. He has won the LMP Award for editing and has a Ph.D. in American history from NYU. He lives with his wife and son in Maplewood, New Jersey.

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Trapped: How the World Rescued 33 Miners from 2,000 Feet Below the Chilean Desert 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
For those of you who are talking about obscene things, you guys have to grow up. Nobody respects that type of people. Why would you talk about porn in the review section of an excellent book. Sell your conversation somewhere elde and go have a great future, asking for some money. You have to be a good person. Was your purpose of life to watch girls kissing or lesbians? The purpose of life is to be a good person and having such vague ideas in your head will ruin you and make you messed up. I bet that you look at beauty magazines for girls and you look at a model with her private spot showing. Grow up and please drain that out of your head, unless you really want to go to hell when you die. For those of you who want read this book, I strongly recommend this book. This is a great nonfiction story about an event that might've turned out to be as tragic as the 9/11 Twin Tower attacks. But it was a huge success for the 33 miners. I really enjoyed this book and strongly suggest this book. I'm turning into a senior in middle and I had to read this for my Summer Reading assignment. People should read this book, whether you have to for school or not. I reallt loved this book. You should check out my second reading book for my school, "Chew On This" by Charles Wilson and Eric Schlosser. That's a book about the secrets of the fast food restaurants. That book influenced me not to eat too much fast foods, even if I don't really eat it that much. Anyways, I strongly recommend those two books, this one and "Chew On This," book to people who want a great future and love to read. I want to go to Yale and go to law school for graduate school. I wish to be a US Supreme Court Chief Justice. That will happen to me one day :) Anyways, enjoy reading this book and the other book i mentioned!!! They're a joy!!! And that's a promise :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a book that when you ask for more it gives you more. It is a great book for young reader. If u like mythologie it has alittle of that. I recomend to any one willing to read a good book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book and how it switches back and forth between Above and Below. It really expresses what is going on. I highly recommend this book. I hope you enjoy the book as much as i did. LOVE U ALL!!!!! ;)
JaxJV More than 1 year ago
I was led to believe that the author would tell us more about the personal lives of the miners before and after the disaster.....................it did not materialize. The book was very short with just over 100 pages. Jack Vax
224perweek More than 1 year ago
Wow! I had no idea the dangers that miners went through. I'll never look at my jewelry the same again. I also learned a bit about our planet. This was a quick read and very informative. It was easy to understand and has great pictures that really brought the whole tragedy to light. Great for anyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im lesbian
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Some girl wants u at result one bro.
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Walks there s e x i l y
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like takeing the shape of other ppl.i like screwing with ppl babe.