Traveller

Traveller

3.5 4
by Richard Adams
     
 

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'Call Traveller, and you will get home safely'. 'Traveller' is the story of the American Civil war as seen through the eyes of Traveller, famous horse of the great Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Now old and in retirement in the stable of his master, the beautiful iron-grey Traveller relates the story of his life to the stable cat Tom. Traveller's understanding,

Overview

'Call Traveller, and you will get home safely'. 'Traveller' is the story of the American Civil war as seen through the eyes of Traveller, famous horse of the great Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Now old and in retirement in the stable of his master, the beautiful iron-grey Traveller relates the story of his life to the stable cat Tom. Traveller's understanding, feelings and impressions about events and people sometimes miss the mark, but his loyalty to the South, courage in battle, utter devotion to his master, and his faithful service through the horrors of what has been called the first Industrial war, shine through. His horse nature and his honest simplicity, as revealed in his tale, contrast with the horrors, cruelty and complications of war in this poignant and moving animal story. As in 'Watership Down', the book with rabbits as heroes, Adams enters imaginatively into the mind and heart of an animal to tell a story with messages about humankind that are not always flattering to the 'higher' species.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The author of Watership Down devises an ironic, revisionist view of the Civil War as seen by Robert E. Lee's horse, Traveller. ``Fans of Adams's earlier novels will rejoice in his undiminished gift for conveying both the physical life and the interior essence of an animal . . . . But the author's depiction of human action is less convincing, with repetitious, meandering delineations of encampments, advances and attacks,'' said PW. (Dec.)
Library Journal
The Civil War has been viewed from almost every possible perspective, but Adams breaks new ground: a first-person narrative, in dialect, by Robert E. Lee's horse. Traveller's equine memoirs are told to a cat in the stable of the retired general. There is a twist to this central event in American history: Traveller is unaware that Lee lost. Although Adams's five previous novels were well received, the mythic clarity and enchantment of Watership Down or Shardik are missing here. Still, interest in the previous novels should create demand. BOMC alternate. Edwin B. Burgess, U.S. Army TRALINET Ctr., Fort Monroe, Va.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781783015825
Publisher:
Watership Down Enterprises
Publication date:
11/27/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
381,326
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Richard George Adams (born 9 May, 1920) is an English novelist best known as the author of Watership Down.He originally began telling the story of Watership Down to his two daughters, and they insisted he publish it as a book. When finally published, it sold over a million copies in record time in both the United Kingdom and the United States. Watership Down has become a modern classic and won both the Carnegie Medal and the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize in 1972. Others of Richard’s books include Shardik, Maia, Tales from Watership Down, The Girl in a Swing and The Plague Dogs, the last two of which, together with Watership Down, have been filmed. His goal is to tell a good story, ideally one so good you can't put it down! Richard Adams currently lives in Hampshire, England. He has written about his childhood and youth, including the time he served in the army in World War II, in 'The Day Gone By'.

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Traveller 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Civil War from the viewpoint of - General Robert E. Lee's horse??? Traveller, still a colt when his first owner sets off for a place called the War, can't wait to get there because surely anywhere young men seek so eagerly must be just like heaven. A horse's version of heaven, that is! So where is it that he winds up instead? A place of noise and blood, exhaustion and starvation, and death for horses as well as for men. His new master, 'Marse Robert,' wins Traveller's heart so wholly that lively young horse soon decides he'd never prefer to be elsewhere. Yet still, Traveller never stops wishng he might have made it to the War at last...and that's just one of the seriocomic differences between a horse's perspective and that of the humans who surround and control him. A delightful blend of fun and poignancy, complete with Traveller-coined nicknames for Marse Robert's fellow generals that had me in stitches. Anthropomorphic animals aren't usually favorites with me, and I sometimes found the use of dialect distracting but I thoroughly enjoyed this book just the same.