Travels to the Source of the Missouri River: And Across the American Continent to the Pacific Ocean 1804, 1805, and 1806

Overview

The Lewis and Clark expedition of 1804–1806 across America from Pittsburg to the Pacific and back was the third recorded transcontinental journey. President Jefferson had negotiated the Louisiana Purchase of over two million square kilometres from the French in 1803, and the aim of the expedition was to investigate the territory involved. He commissioned a Corps of Discovery as a scientific and military expedition to survey the acquisition, appointing his aide Meriwether Lewis (1774–1809) to lead it. It was hoped...

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Overview

The Lewis and Clark expedition of 1804–1806 across America from Pittsburg to the Pacific and back was the third recorded transcontinental journey. President Jefferson had negotiated the Louisiana Purchase of over two million square kilometres from the French in 1803, and the aim of the expedition was to investigate the territory involved. He commissioned a Corps of Discovery as a scientific and military expedition to survey the acquisition, appointing his aide Meriwether Lewis (1774–1809) to lead it. It was hoped to discover that the Missouri and other rivers could be used for transcontinental communication and transport, and to assess the natural resources of the area. Some of the party returned east with specimens, reports and a map, while the remainder reached the Pacific in December 1805. Volume 3 covers the return journey, during which Lewis and Clark separated to survey more of the tributaries of the Missouri.

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Table of Contents

24. A general description of the beasts, birds, and plants, &c. found by the party in this expedition; 25. Difficulty of procuring means of subsistence for the party; 26. Description of Wappatoo Island, and the mode in which the nations gather wappatoo; 27. Captain Clarke procures four horses for the transportation of the baggage; 28. The party still pursue their route towards the Kooskooskee on horseback, with Wollawollah guides; 29. The party encamp amongst the Chopunnish; 30. The party mingle in the diversions of the Willetpos Indians, a tribe hitherto unnoticed; 31. The party proceed on their journey with their Indian guides, and at length agree to divide, to take several routes, and to meet again at the mouth of the Yellowstone River; 32. Captain Lewis and his party still proceed on the route mentioned in the last chapter, and arrive at the forks of Maria's River; 33. The party commanded by Captain Clarke, previous to his being joined by Captain Lewis, proceed along Clarke's River, in pursuance of the route mentioned in a preceding chapter; 34. Captain Clarke proceeds with his party down the river; 35. The party, while descending the river in their skin canoes, are overtaken by the detachment under Captain Lewis, and the whole party, now once more happily united, descend the Missouri together; 36. The party return in safety to St. Louis.

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