Treasure Hunt

( 68 )

Overview

The widow of a major player in the world of San Francisco nonprofits believes that his alleged mistress killed him-and she's putting up fifty grand to whoever helps prove it. Wyatt Hunt and his investigation firm want in on that action-no matter where it takes them...

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Treasure Hunt

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Overview

The widow of a major player in the world of San Francisco nonprofits believes that his alleged mistress killed him-and she's putting up fifty grand to whoever helps prove it. Wyatt Hunt and his investigation firm want in on that action-no matter where it takes them...

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Bestseller Lescroart’s lackluster third Hunt Club thriller (after The Suspect) finds PI Wyatt Hunt near the end of his rope. Business has slowed to a trickle; Hunt’s relationship with his old high school friend, homicide detective Devin Juhle, is on the rocks; his receptionist, Tamara Dade, has walked out; and Tamara’s brother, Mickey, is his only remaining employee. When Mickey discovers the body of Dominic Como, San Francisco’s most prominent civic activist, he proposes a way for Hunt’s agency to get involved in the murder investigation and perhaps return to solvency. Como’s extensive charities, like the Sunset Youth Project and its subsidiaries, operated with a budget of about $50 million—a sum large enough to put all sorts of murder motives into play. And just how jealous was Como’s wife of her husband’s young and pretty female driver? A labored gathering of suspects, police, and Hunt Club operatives allows Hunt to produce the killer in melodramatic fashion. (Jan.)
Kirkus Reviews
A month from throwing in the towel, Wyatt Hunt gets a chance to put his faltering private-investigation firm back on the map. Ever since The Hunt Club made headlines and trod on important San Francisco toes in its first big case (The Hunt Club, 2006), his name has been anathema in police circles, and spooked clients have stayed away too. But when Hunt tells aspiring chef Mickey Dade, his driver and sometime fieldworker, that he's going to have to let him go, Mickey makes a counter-offer. Fresh from discovering the body of wealthy activist/philanthropist Dominic Como, Mickey has heard that Hunt's old nemesis, Inspector Devin Juhle, is looking to pin the murder on Alicia Thorpe, a volunteer at Como's principal charity, Sunset Youth Project (SYP). Hunt could make the rounds of the organizations Como funded, Mickey suggests, get them to put up a substantial reward for information leading to a conviction and ride the attendant publicity back into the limelight. It's a pleasure to watch Hunt-at first diffident, then increasingly confident-persuade the executive directors of Mission Coalition, Sanctuary House and SYP to pony up. In a particularly zesty turn of events, grieving widow Ellen Como adds a substantial sum to the reward even as she's promising to claim the whole pot if her announcement that her husband was carrying on with Alicia closes the case. Alas, it's all downhill from there. Despite a second murder, there's little excitement in Juhle's pursuit of Alicia; The Hunt Club's investigation mainly turns up the unsurprising news that there's a lot of civic corruption in the Bay Area; and the denouement, in which Hunt summons all the leading figures in the case to his office so that hecan identify the killer by spotting discrepancies in the suspects' stories, will make you think you've wandered into an antique bookstore. Worth reading only for Lescroart's customary sharp-edged portrait of the myriad temptations San Francisco offers citizens with money and power.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780451231451
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 12/28/2010
  • Series: Wyatt Hunt Series , #2
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 464
  • Sales rank: 384,517
  • Product dimensions: 4.20 (w) x 7.40 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

John T. Lescroart
John Lescroart is the bestselling author of eighteen previous novels, which have sold more than ten million copies. He lives with his family in Northern California.

Biography

John Lescroart has made a name (albeit an unpronounceable one!) for himself as the author of crime thrillers, most notably an acclaimed series starring the San Francisco lawyer-and-cop team of Dismas Hardy and Abe Glitsky. But the road to bestsellerdom has been paved with more than a few unexpected detours for this hardworking novelist, who has been writing all his adult life but who only started to chart big around the mid-1990s.

Lescroart (pronounced les-KWA) grew up with an equal interest in music and writing. After college, he concentrated his energies on the former, performing alone and in bands around the San Francisco Bay area and scribbling in whatever spare time he could find. But he set a deadline for himself, and when he had not "made it" by age 30, he quit music to focus on writing. Within weeks he finished up a novel-in-progress based on his experiences living in Spain. He submitted it to a former high school teacher who was less than dazzled; but the man's wife loved it and entered the manuscript in a local competition. Although it would not formally see print for another four years, Sunburn won the prestigious Joseph Henry Jackson Award, beating out Anne Rice's Interview with a Vampire for the best novel by a California author.

To support his art, Lescroart held down a dizzying succession of jobs -- from house painting and bartending to working as a legal secretary. At one point, just as he was ready to enroll in the creative writing program at Amherst, he was offered a lucrative gig he could not afford to pass up, and graduate school fell by the wayside. As the years passed, some of his books were published, but he never felt financially secure enough to write full-time. Then, in 1989, he contracted spinal meningitis after body-surfing in contaminated seawater. He emerged from his life-threatening ordeal with a new resolve, quit the last of his day jobs, and became a real working novelist.

It took a few tries for Dismas Hardy to become the fully realized character Lescroart's fans have come to know and love. Debuting in 1989's Dead Irish, Hardy began life as an ex-cop/ex-attorney turned bartender and did not return to the practice of law until his third appearance in Hard Evidence (1993). From then on, interest grew in the series, which has snowballed into a lucrative franchise for the author. In 2006, Lescroart introduced another San Francisco-based dynamic duo, private investigator Wyatt Hunt and homicide detective Devin Juhle, in The Hunt Club. Slightly younger than Hardy and Glitsky but drawn with the same humanizing brush, the protagonists of this series have proved immensely popular with readers.

Incidentally, Lescroart's writing success has allowed him to return to his other love: He has founded his own independent label, CrowArt Records, which showcases some of his own music and produces CDs by a number of artist/friends. At long last, John Lescroart is able to enjoy the best of both worlds.

Good To Know

In our exclusive interview, Lescroart let us in on some fun and fascinating insights about himself and his life as a writer:

"First, it's Less-KWAH. Here's a tip -- don't have that name. Get a pen name that people can pronounce and remember. Just this Saturday, I gave a talk at a well-attended writers' conference. There were probably a hundred people in the room, and the talk went very well. Five minutes later, I was in the bathroom washing my hands and around the corner, I heard a guy tell another that he'd just heard the greatest talk by John le Carré. 'You know, The Tailor of Panama and the Smiley books? Good stuff. I'm going to go buy all his books.'"

"Second, I didn't have to quit the day job to keep writing. One of the most productive times in my early writing life was while I had a full-time job as a word processor in a law firm and also worked part-time at night, often working until 11:00 p.m. How did I do any writing, you might ask? Well, I did it between 6:00 and 8:00 in the morning, four pages a day, and published five books in six years. But because a) I was making some money doing 'regular' work and didn't have to be scrounging for coin and b) I was panic-stricken at the little time that was left in the day to write, I wound up becoming more efficient."

"Third, I don't wait on inspiration, and I refuse to acknowledge 'writer's block.' I simply sit down and put words on the paper. It's like being a carpenter -- writers build things. Carpenters don't wake up and say, 'Hmm, I'm not in the mood to drive nails today.' No, they go to work and do the job. It's not very romantic, but that's how I approach writing."

"If you have a good relationship, nurture it. The great god of Writing with a capital "W" isn't the only thing in life. It can be a great part and a big part, but it shouldn't consume you on a daily basis and shouldn't make your life miserable all the time. Try not to get nuts about the greater success of other writers -- we're really not in competition with other writers. We're only trying to outdo ourselves, to get better at our jobs. Go on dates. Spend some time outside (fishing is good, so is skiing, hiking, swimming, jogging). Stay in shape -- writing is a marathon. Don't drink too much. Have as much fun as you can."

Lescroart used to perform as "Johnny Capo" in a group called Johnny Capo and His Real Good Band. Although he no longer performs with that outfit, he still pursues music as the founder of his very own independent label called CrowArt Records. The first project on the label was Date Night, a CD of his own compositions performed by master pianist Antonio Castillo de la Gala. Followers of Lescroart's writing may recognize the in-joke in the album's title. As he explains on his web site, "Fans of Dismas Hardy will know that Diz and Frannie (Dismas's wife) set aside every Wednesday night for some time alone together -- it's their date night."

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    1. Also Known As:
      John Lescroart
    2. Hometown:
      El Macero, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 14, 1948
    2. Place of Birth:
      Houston, Texas
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English with Honors, UC Berkeley, 1970

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 68 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(15)

4 Star

(27)

3 Star

(13)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(8)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 69 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 19, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Two Out Of Three

    This week I read three books, starting with John Burdett's brilliant Godfather of Kathmandu, then Robert Crais' very satisfying The First Rule. I was sure that I was going to be three out of three since I liked Lescroart's last book so much.
    But, it was not to be. Treasure Hunt is a dud in comparison to the other two. It's a dud in comparison to Lescroart's last novel, which I gave five stars. His characters are uninteresting and thinly developed. I wouldn't go so far as to say he phoned it in, but it could have been so much more. The author discusses the abuse of community service organizations, and that could have made a great story if he took it further. But instead he chose a rather pedestrian plot that just bored me.
    Even the Hunt Club members, who are supposed to be the good guys, showed a surprisingly short level of integrity and common sense. Try harder next time, Mr.Lescroart.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 7, 2010

    easy reading

    i read this book in 1.5 days. liked it smooth reading. characters were life like. they feed off each other. read it. i think you will like it. does not take long to get into the book either.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    he latest Wyatt Hunt private investigator case is a fast-paced thriller

    In San Francisco private investigator Wyatt Hunt is feeling the economic down turn as clients are almost nonexistent. His receptionist Tamara Dade quit leaving Wyatt with one employee her brother, Mickey, who is bored and wants field work, but no clients hire the firm.

    Mickey has his chance when he finds the body of activist Dominic Como, who was on the board of over a dozen charities. He persuades his boss to let him investigate, which should bring in fame and money. Several suspects surface with strong motives from money to jealousy, but the prime person that Hunt and Dade focus on is Alicia Thorpe; and not just because she is beautiful, but due to her acting as if she is concealing something from the cops and the sleuths.

    The latest Wyatt Hunt private investigator case (see The Hunt Club) is a fast-paced thriller that seems to go nowhere until a final gala with cops and suspects so that the hero can pull a dead rabbit out of the hat. Still Treasure Hunt is fun to follow as Wyatt and Mickey work the city streets to solve the case of the charity mogul murder.

    Harriet Klausner

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 8, 2011

    Difficult to believe this was written by Lescroart

    I very much agree with KenCady's review. John Lescroart's books are great...with the exception of the Wyatt Hunt series. It's difficult to believe that John Lescroart actually wrote these they are so subpar to his Dismas Hardy series. I, too, had just finished Robert Crais' excellent book The First Rule and was very much looking forward to following it with a book from another of my favorite authors: Lescroart. Treasure Hunt was a terrible disappointment. I didn't even finish it. Both of the Wyatt Hunt books are very poorly written. I won't buy another one from that series. Hopefully Lescroart has not gone the way of James Patterson.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 17, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    The Hunt Club is Back!

    Like all of Lescroart's books in this series, this twisted thriller will not disappoint. The author's characters are cleanly and swiftly developed in prose so strong that you can see, feel, smell and touch each of them.

    The book works well as a 1st-time to Lescroart read, but is even better having read the precedant works. The story line is vibrant and unique, taking interesting twists while embracing the "work" of Not-for-Profits.

    Treasure Hunt is a must-read. Colourful, entertaining and a page turner. Enjoy!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2010

    Typical well-plotted, highly readable Lescroat novel

    While not quite up to the last Dismas Hardy book, it is definitely a good read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 27, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    DOUGH FOR INFORMATION

    Not a bad book, but not one of Lescroart's best. Story line is weak.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2012

    Disappointing. This book started out nicely and then dragged on

    Disappointing. This book started out nicely and then dragged on.
    I much prefer books by Lee Child, Stuart Woods, Sandra Brown, Linda Fairstein or Michael Connelly.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Good follow-up in this series

    Enjoy the backdrop of the best city in the U.S.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Like the author

    enjoy browsing and checking for new or old authors.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Hunt Club rides again

    An average read, not too thought provoking.Pleasant characters, a little predictable.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    A very interesting book

    This book kept me on the edge of my seat. It was hard to put it down at night.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Lescroart's best in some time

    I like the Dismas Hardy series, but there have been many of them. With this one, we're back to the 'Hunt Club' and I really enjoyed it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Another John Lescroart success

    I have read several books by this author and this ranks up there with the best of them. I bought this to read on the flight from NY to San Diego and I was not disappointed. I finished it on way there.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    A fairly good read, a bit bland.

    Again, a bland read but I would purchase again because I really Lescroart.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Loved the suspense

    I enjoy this author an buy almost eveything he writes, some are better than others, but this one was very good.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Lescroart keeps your guessing!

    Good reading. Keeps you turning the pages.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Author running out of material

    Once-good author running out of things for his characters to do

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Really interesting reading

    Pleasure reading for relaxation

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    dissappoiinting

    strange plot about detective (?) type characters involved in gathering donations.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 69 Customer Reviews

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