Treasure Hunter's Handbook

( 2 )

Overview

Treasure Hunter’s Handbook is for kids and families who love to explore the world around them! Treasure hunting is a fun family activity that encourages kids to get outside, and Gardner Walsh’s new book helps young explorers learn how to pan for gold, use metal detectors to find buried treasure, use GPS to do geocaching or letterboxing, and search for arrowheads and gemstones. Treasure Hunter’s Handbook also includes wonderful bits of pirate lore and some fun ...
See more details below
Hardcover
$13.87
BN.com price
(Save 18%)$16.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (15) from $5.07   
  • New (10) from $10.13   
  • Used (5) from $5.07   
Treasure Hunter's Handbook

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$8.49
BN.com price
(Save 15%)$9.99 List Price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

Treasure Hunter’s Handbook is for kids and families who love to explore the world around them! Treasure hunting is a fun family activity that encourages kids to get outside, and Gardner Walsh’s new book helps young explorers learn how to pan for gold, use metal detectors to find buried treasure, use GPS to do geocaching or letterboxing, and search for arrowheads and gemstones. Treasure Hunter’s Handbook also includes wonderful bits of pirate lore and some fun pirate/treasure-hunting craft activities. Ahoy, matey!

The following topics are covered, allowing for a wide range of activities for different ages and interests:

Myths and legends of buried pirate treasure.
Panning for gold: Panning for gold is making a comeback and is a great activity for kids.
Mining for minerals and gemstones: Provides some information about how and where to find Maine's famous tourmaline and other gems.
Metal Detecting: Covers the basics of using a metal detector and tells some of the stories of amazing treasure found using this simple device.
Geocaching and letter boxing: Geocaching is a real-world, outdoor treasure hunting activity using GPS-enabled devices. Letter boxing is a low tech version that combines navigational skills and rubber stamp artistry.
Found treasures: Hunting for everyday treasures such as sea glass, sea shells, four-leaf clovers, arrowheads, and fossils.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
There is treasure all around, and Walsh gives pointers on how to find it.
However it’s defined—pirates’ gold; buried metal discovered with a metal detector; geocaches or letterboxes; rocks, minerals and gems; or sea glass, fossils or meteorites—this book has solid advice on how to find it. Six chapters address each of these treasures in turn, discussing how to find them, equipment needed, methodologies, and some safety guidelines and codes of conduct. Some history is thrown in throughout, and a scattering of personal stories and interviews adds a personal touch. While Walsh states that the “best treasure hunters work from feelings of intuition, which means that you just know something without really knowing why,” she also points kids to local resources for finding treasures that don’t rely on intuition, and a bibliography at the end provides other informational sources to consult. While the text often highlights the state of Maine, the ideas and advice presented could apply in almost any area. Vocabulary is well-defined within the text, and full-color photos throughout show kids actively engaged in treasure hunting, their tools and many of the finds that are possible.
Let the treasure hunting begin!
The Quoddy Tides
Treasure Hunter's Handbook by Liza Gardner Walsh, will be a welcome addition to the bookshelf of those children who busrt with energy, curiosity and a love of the outdoors.
Down East
Liza Gardner Walsh taps that youthful optimism/lust for riches in her Treasure Hunter's Handbook. . . .[It is] a cheekily useful children's primer to seeking fortunes mythological, geological, and man-made. Really, this is an activity guide for parents and caretakers. With equipment lists, step-by-step directions, and bright color photos, Gardner Walsh guides families through the basics of gold panning, geoaching, seeking pirate treasure, setting up a killer savenger hunt, and more.
School Library Journal
07/01/2014
Gr 3–6—This fun book details some unique activities that will offer a sense of adventure, exploration, and perceived independence, though the author is clear on the necessity of safety precautions and adult involvement. A theme of discovering treasures runs through the book, including pirate booty, gold, metals, rocks, minerals, gemstones, sea glass, fossils, and meteorites. A chapter is devoted to each kind of treasure hunt, with straightforward instructions on how to proceed and necessary equipment. Though family-friendly vacations might be planned around the pursuit of a specific treasure, Walsh suggests that hunting can easily take place in the woods, beaches, or streams close to home and even in one's own backyard. One section of the book is devoted to geocaching and letterboxing, two challenging activities that require unraveling clues or codes to locate a hiding spot with treasures contained within; once the spot is discovered, the hunter adds to the treasures, thus participating in a community of like-minded people. This book is a treasure trove itself when it comes to noting nonfiction text features. A wonderful introduction to some fun-filled, unique forms of recreation, the book uses exposition, photos, bullet lists, and text boxes. While instructions are provided for making an old-fashioned treasure map, more sample maps might have been a useful addition to this otherwise excellent book. One other minor drawback is the absence of an index.—Gloria Koster, West School, New Canaan, CT
Kirkus Reviews
2014-06-04
There is treasure all around, and Walsh gives pointers on how to find it.However it’s defined—pirates’ gold; buried metal discovered with a metal detector; geocaches or letterboxes; rocks, minerals and gems; or sea glass, fossils or meteorites—this book has solid advice on how to find it. Six chapters address each of these treasures in turn, discussing how to find them, equipment needed, methodologies, and some safety guidelines and codes of conduct. Some history is thrown in throughout, and a scattering of personal stories and interviews adds a personal touch. While Walsh states that the “best treasure hunters work from feelings of intuition, which means that you just know something without really knowing why,” she also points kids to local resources for finding treasures that don’t rely on intuition, and a bibliography at the end provides other informational sources to consult. While the text often highlights the state of Maine, the ideas and advice presented could apply in almost any area. Vocabulary is well-defined within the text, and full-color photos throughout show kids actively engaged in treasure hunting, their tools and many of the finds that are possible.Let the treasure hunting begin! (Nonfiction. 7-12)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781608932788
  • Publisher: Down East Books
  • Publication date: 8/7/2014
  • Pages: 112
  • Sales rank: 639,718
  • Age range: 6 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 7.20 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Liza Gardner Walsh has worked as a children’s librarian, high-school English teacher, writing tutor, museum educator, and she holds an MFA in writing from Vermont College. She lives with her family in Camden, Maine.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 11, 2014

    Every child dreams of finding buried treasure.  Liza Gardner Wal

    Every child dreams of finding buried treasure.  Liza Gardner Walsh has created a wonderful manual for the hunt.  This treasure hunting manual is written for children and families.  With wonderful photographs by Jennifer Smith-Mayo, children are taught the art of treasure hunting in an easy to understand and respectful way.  How-to's, tips and tricks, and terms make treasure hunting sound fun.  Treasure hunting methods include: pirate treasure, panning for gold, metal detecting, geocaching and letterboxing, rocks and minerals, sea glass, fossils, meteorites and more.  This is may be one of the best manuals for kids I've read.  

    While this book is well written and fun, there is one point that bothered me.  It pertains to finding artifacts.  Walsh encourages kids to dig things up and be their own scientist.  She forgets, however, that many of the fields have standards.  For example, archaeologists don't just dig things up - the context and how and where things were found are just as important - if not more - than the actual discovery.  Without documentation, a find just is not as valuable.  This is not mentioned, that I recall.  I'm concerned about the valuable information that will be lost when the sciences have improved so much.  The author sites Mary Anning, a girl who was a paleontologist at age 11 in England.  What the author doesn't stress is that in 1810 just digging up things and keeping it was what people did.  There was no context.  Finding them was certainly a feet, but not explaining that today things would be measured, photographed, drawn, soil sampled, painstakingly dusted and more is a bit misleading and could be detrimental to science, the scientific community, and more importantly, to history.

    Walsh created a fun how-to guide for kids and families on how to treasure hunt.  Hunting for treasure has long captured our imagination.  Through a multitude of methods, the reader will certainly be able to find the perfect method for them.  I can't wait to start the hunt!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 13, 2014

    I was very pleased with the book. It is an interesting and livel

    I was very pleased with the book. It is an interesting and lively introduction to treasure hunting as an outdoor activity for children. Included in treasure hunting is not only looking for buried pirate treasure, but also panning for gold, letterboxing, geocaching, metal detecting and hunting for rocks, minerals and sea glass.
    The book is a good introduction to the various activities, laying out what is needed for supplies, equipment and preparation (including getting property owners permission before exploring!), as well as some hard earned advice. My personal favorite was to leave the rock identification books in the car- they only get heavy lugging them around, and it is easier and more fun to simply bring the specimens to the car for identification if curious about them.
    And although this book is designed for younger readers, older youngsters or mixed grades of children will enjoy it as well. This book is especially well prepared for home schooling a family of different aged children. And indeed, much of the book seemed to be aimed at the teacher, parent or scout leader as an introduction and overview to these activities. Perhaps the reading level is high for the targeted group, but this is not the case for advanced readers and gifted students, who may particularly like this practical application of book advice to real world explorations.
    I also liked her spelling out the code of conduct for some of these activities, to show the kids that not only can they take pleasure from them, but they must also give back and help with the pleasure of others who come afterwards and who also share the sport.
    Finally, Liza Gardner Walsh does the best thing of all in this book. She gives and introduction to the activities, but leaves the reader wanting more. After reading, the kids will want to both to try out the activities, and to learn more about them. Her only failing is not putting the final line in the book: "If you would like to learn more about these and other activities, speak to your local school and public librarian!"

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)