Treasure Island / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $98.19
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (1) from $98.19   
  • Used (1) from $98.19   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$98.19
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(5)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Very Good
2007 Paperback Very good Showing some signs of wear. Corners/cover slightly bumped/creased. *****PLEASE NOTE: This item is shipping from an authorized seller in Europe. In the ... event that a return is necessary, you will be able to return your item within the US. To learn more about our European sellers and policies see the BookQuest FAQ section***** Read more Show Less

Ships from: Hereford, United Kingdom

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

First published over a century ago, this extraordinary tale of long-lost treasure and revenge remains one of the most memorable in classic literature. In this unabridged gift edition, two-time Cladecott Medal-winning illustrators Leo and Diane Dillon capture perfectly the grandeur, beauty and perils of Captain Nemo's underwater world.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Stevenson’s prototypical swashbuckling story receives a traditional treatment in this unabridged, oversize version. Lawrence evokes the essence of classic adventure stories with his vinyl-cut illustrations, as thick black shapes are tempered by muted tones of blue, gold and green. The grimacing faces of pirates are appropriately blemished and begrimed, elegant vessels are seen moored under a starry sky and the island’s wild intrigue is captured in subtle, grainy glimpses. As they follow Jim Hawkins to sea, readers will feel they’ve discovered a true relic with this edition. Ages 9–14. (Oct.)
Children's Literature - Amie Rose Rotruck
When an old sea captain appears at the inn that Jim Hawkins' family owns, a series of events begins that sends Jim into one of the most classic adventures in children's literature. Jim holds the keys to the treasure of the late Captain Flint, which attracts the attention of many pirates, including a certain Long John Silver. From taverns in England to exotic islands, Jim, the pirates, and some helpers from home all travel to find this elusive treasure. Young Jim finds that it is hard to look for a treasure when people want you dead—and you never know who to trust! While the new reader may find some of the story cliche, one must remember that this is the pirate story upon which all modern pirate stories are modeled. The original pirate story for children still reigns supreme, now with a wonderful forward by Eoin Colfer. Reviewer: Amie Rose Rotruck
From the Publisher
 • "It is a breathless journey and the closest thing to a real pirate adventure without an eye patch and a time machine... It is a unique work of genius." --Eoin Colfer, author of Artemis Fowl

 • "Who can think of a pirate without conjuring up the image of Long John Silver?" --Daily Mail

Roslyn Jolly
"Easily accessible, bottom-of-the-page notes provide outstanding illumination of the text’s literary and historical contexts, particularly biblical and nautical references that might otherwise elude modern readers. No other edition provides a better insight into the (sometimes murky) compositional processes behind this classic work of fiction. For fans of Sutherland's unique detective-style readings, the appendix of 'puzzles and conundrums' will prove an added bonus."
Mark Hanna
"Broadview's new edition of Robert Louis Stevenson's classic Treasure Island is an excellent teaching text because of its detailed textual annotations, which help guide readers through the book's nineteenth-century context. As a historian, I appreciate how these annotations, along with the five appendices, place Stevenson's fantasy in context with popular seventeenth- and eighteenth-century textual influences on pirate mythology. John Sutherland finishes the edition with a series of 'puzzles and conundrums' raised by the story; these are bound to stimulate discussion in a seminar setting."
Children's Literature - Peg Glisson
Innocent young man, pirates, buried treasure, adventure—Stevenson packed it all into this classic! Jim Hawkins narrates his tale, which begins in the inn run by his parents. The old sea dog Billy Bones arrives with his sea chest, planning to finish his days at the inn. Bones hires Jim to watch out for other sailors, but Jim is unable to prevent visits by those hunting Bones. The deaths of Bones and Jim's father force Jim and his mother to flee for their lives. To cover Bone's debt, they take a packet of his from his chest and later discover a treasure map showing the location of Pirate Flint's buried treasure. Jim joins forces with Squire Trelawny and Dr. Livesey, who use their resources to buy and outfit a ship, hire a crew (including Long John Silver, who is also searching for the treasure), and set sail for Treasure Island. Jim overhears Silver and some of his former cohorts planning a mutiny. A bloody battle ensues on board and on the island, with Jim and his men eventually prevailing and heading home with the treasure on board. Lawrence's woodcut illustrations are an outstanding complement to this swashbuckling and unabridged tale. Thick black shapes with muted color undertones capture the spirit of Stevenson's words. Several elements of design vividly unite text and illustrations. The double-page Table of Contents, with small woodcuts on the left, gives the reader a quick overview of all that is to happen. Small woodcuts are also placed at the beginning of each chapter and strategically throughout the book. Multiple full-page and double-spread cuts showing fierce pirates, beautiful scenery, elegant ships, and more complete Lawrence's bold and visually striking storytelling. The font has an old-fashioned look, yet it is crisp and easy to read. This enduring tale of greed, loyalty, discovery, and adventure will reach a new generation in this large, boisterous, stunning edition. Reviewer: Peg Glisson
Joseph Boone
Treasure Island is perhaps THE classic pirate's tale. Robert Louis Stevenson, the author, created a rich story of adventure and treachery on the high seas all seen through the eyes of a boy named Jim Hawkins. In short, Treasure Island well deserves its status as a beloved classic. It's a story of suspense and adventure that can be enjoyed at a child's level, but has substance for adults as well. I would recommend without reserve it to virtually anyone.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Robert Louis  Stevenson
Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Scotland in 1850. His father, grandfather, and other ancestors were engineers, famous for the lighthouses they designed. Robert studied law for a while, then became a writer in his late twenties. He wrote articles about his travels in Europe and America, as well as such famous adventure stories as Treasure Island and Kidnapped. The original Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde was published in 1886. Robert Louis Stevenson died eight years later.

Greg Rebis was born in Queens, New York, but mostly grew up in central Florida. After working in civic government, pizza delivery, music retail, and proofreading, he eventually landed work in publishing, film, and graphics. He currently lives and studies in Rhode Island and still loves art, sci-fi, and video games.

Wim Coleman and Pat Perrin are a married couple who love writing books together. They have written many young adult nonfiction and fiction books, including retellings of classic novels, stories, and myths. They run a scholarship program for Mexican students and live in Guanajuato, Mexico.

Wim Coleman and Pat Perrin are a married couple who love writing books together. They have written many young adult nonfiction and fiction books, including retellings of classic novels, stories, and myths. They run a scholarship program for Mexican students and live in Guanajuato, Mexico.

Biography

Robert Louis Stevenson was born in 1850 in Edinburgh. His father was an engineer, the head of a family firm that had constructed most of Scotland's lighthouses, and the family had a comfortable income. Stevenson was an only child and was often ill; as a result, he was much coddled by both his parents and his long-time nurse. The family took frequent trips to southern Europe to escape the cruel Edinburgh winters, trips that, along with his many illnesses, caused Stevenson to miss much of his formal schooling. He entered Edinburgh University in 1867, intending to become an engineer and enter the family business, but he was a desultory, disengaged student and never took a degree. In 1871, Stevenson switched his study to law, a profession which would leave time for his already-budding literary ambitions, and he managed to pass the bar in 1875.

Illness put an end to his legal career before it had even started, and Stevenson spent the next few years traveling in Europe and writing travel essays and literary criticism. In 1876, Stevenson fell in love with Fanny Vandergrift Osbourne, a married American woman more than ten years his senior, and returned with her to London, where he published his first fiction, "The Suicide Club." In 1879, Stevenson set sail for America, apparently in response to a telegram from Fanny, who had returned to California in an attempt to reconcile with her husband. Fanny obtained a divorce and the couple married in 1880, eventually returning to Europe, where they lived for the next several years. Stevenson was by this time beset by terrifying lung hemorrhages that would appear without warning and required months of convalescence in a healthy climate. Despite his periodic illnesses and his peripatetic life, Stevenson completed some of his most enduring works during this period: Treasure Island (1883), A Child's Garden of Verses (1885), Kidnapped (1886), and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886).

After his father's death and a trip to Edinburgh which he knew would be his last, Stevenson set sail once more for America in 1887 with his wife, mother, and stepson. In 1888, after spending a frigid winter in the Adirondack Mountains, Stevenson chartered a yacht and set sail from California bound for the South Pacific. The Stevensons spent time in Tahiti, Hawaii, Micronesia, and Australia, before settling in Samoa, where Stevenson bought a plantation called Vailima. Though he kept up a vigorous publishing schedule, Stevenson never returned to Europe. He died of a sudden brain hemorrhage on December 3, 1894.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Good To Know

It has been said that Stevenson may well be the inventor of the sleeping bag -- he described a large fleece-lined sack he brought along to sleep in on a journey through France in his book Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes.

Long John Silver, the one-legged pirate cook in Stevenson's classic Treasure Island, is said to be based on the author's friend William Ernest Henley, whom he met when Henley was in Edinburgh for surgery to save his one good leg from tuberculosis.

Stevenson died in 1894 at Vailima,, his home on the South Pacific island of Upolu, Samoa. He was helping his wife make mayonnaise for dinner when he suffered a fatal stroke.

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 13, 1850
    2. Place of Birth:
      Edinburgh, Scotland
    1. Date of Death:
      December 3, 1894
    2. Place of Death:
      Vailima, Samoa

Read an Excerpt

Treasure Island


By Robert Louis Stevenson

NTC/Contemporary Publishing Company

Copyright © 1998 Robert Louis Stevenson
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0613799976

Chapter One

Chapter I

The Old Sea Dog at the "Admiral Benbow"


Squire Trelawney, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I take up my pen in the year of grace 17-, and go back to the time when my father kept the "Admiral Benbow" inn, and the brown old seaman, with the sabre cut, first took up his lodging under our roof.

I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow; a tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man; his tarry pigtail falling over the shoulders of his soiled blue coat; his hands ragged and scarred, with black, broken nails; and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid white. I remember him looking round the cove and whistling to himself as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so often afterwards:-

"Fifteen men on the dead man's chest-

Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and broken at the capstan bars. Then herapped on the door with a bit of stick like a handspike that he carried, and when my father appeared, called roughly for a glass of rum. This, when it was brought to him, he drank slowly, like a connoisseur, lingering on the taste, and still looking about him at the cliffs and up at our signboard.

"This is a handy cove," says he, at length; "and a pleasant sittyated grog-shop. Much company, mate?"

My father told him no, very little company, the more was the pity.

"Well, then," said he, "this is the berth for me. Here you, matey," he cried to the man who trundled the barrow; "bring up alongside and help up my chest. I'll stay here a bit," he continued. "I'm a plain man; rum and bacon and eggs is what I want, and that head up there for to watch ships off. What you mought call me? You mought call me captain. Oh, I see what you're at-there;" and he threw down three or four gold pieces on the threshold. "You can tell me when I've worked through that," says he, looking as fierce as a commander.

And, indeed, bad as his clothes were, and coarsely as he spoke, he had none of the appearance of a man who sailed before the mast; but seemed like a mate or skipper, accustomed to be obeyed or to strike. The man who came with the barrow told us the mail had set him down the morning before at the "Royal George;" that he had inquired what inns there were along the coast, and hearing ours well spoken of, I suppose, and described as lonely, had chosen it from the others for his place of residence. And that was all we could learn of our guest.

He was a very silent man by custom. All day he hung round the cove, or upon the cliffs, with a brass telescope; all evening he sat in a corner of the parlour next the fire, and drank rum and water very strong. Mostly he would not speak when spoken to; only look up sudden and fierce, and blow through his nose like a fog-horn; and we and the people who came about our house soon learned to let him be. Every day, when he came back from his stroll, he would ask if any seafaring men had gone by along the road? At first we thought it was the want of company of his own kind that made him ask this question; but at last we began to see he was desirous to avoid them. When a seaman put up at the "Admiral Benbow" (as now and then some did, making by the coast road for Bristol), he would look in at him through the curtained door before he entered the parlour; and he was always sure to be as silent as a mouse when any such was present. For me, at least, there was no secret about the matter; for I was, in a way, a sharer in his alarms. He had taken me aside one day, and promised me a silver fourpenny on the first of every month if I would only keep my "weather-eye open for a seafaring man with one leg," and let him know the moment he appeared. Often enough, when the first of the month came round, and I applied to him for my wage, he would only blow through his nose at me, and stare me down; but before the week was out he was sure to think better of it, bring me my fourpenny piece, and repeat his orders to look out for "the seafaring man with one leg."

How that personage haunted my dreams, I need scarcely tell you. On stormy nights, when the wind shook the four corners of the house, and the surf roared along the cove and up the cliffs, I would see him in a thousand forms, and with a thousand diabolical expressions. Now the leg would be cut off at the knee, now at the hip; now he was a monstrous kind of a creature who had never had but the one leg, and that in the middle of his body. To see him leap and run and pursue me over hedge and ditch was the worst of nightmares. And altogether I paid pretty dear for my monthly fourpenny piece, in the shape of these abominable fancies.

But though I was so terrified by the idea of the seafaring man with one leg, I was far less afraid of the captain himself than anybody else who knew him. There were nights when he took a deal more rum and water than his head would carry; and then he would sometimes sit and sing his wicked, old, wild sea-songs, minding nobody; but sometimes he would call for glasses round, and force all the trembling company to listen to his stories or bear a chorus to his singing. Often I have heard the house shaking with "Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum;" all the neighbours joining in for dear life, with the fear of death upon them, and each singing louder than the other, to avoid remark. For in these fits he was the most over-riding companion ever known; he would slap his hand on the table for silence all round; he would fly up in a passion of anger at a question, or sometimes because none was put, and so he judged the company was not following his story. Nor would he allow any one to leave the inn till he had drunk himself sleepy and reeled off to bed.

His stories were what frightened people worst of all. Dreadful stories they were; about hanging, and walking the plank, and storms at sea, and the Dry Tortugas, and wild deeds and places on the Spanish Main. By his own account he must have lived his life among some of the wickedest men that God ever allowed upon the sea; and the language in which he told these stories shocked our plain country people almost as much as the crimes that he described. My father was always saying the inn would be ruined, for people would soon cease coming there to be tyrannised over and put down, and sent shivering to their beds; but I really believe his presence did us good. People were frightened at the time, but on looking back they rather liked it; it was a fine excitement in a quiet country life; and there was even a party of the younger men who pretended to admire him, calling him a "true sea-dog," and a "real old salt," and such like names, and saying there was the sort of man that made England terrible at sea.

In one way, indeed, he bade fair to ruin us; for he kept on staying week after week, and at last month after month, so that all the money had been long exhausted, and still my father never plucked up the heart to insist on having more. If ever he mentioned it, the captain blew through his nose so loudly, that you might say he roared, and stared my poor father out of the room. I have seen him wringing his hands after such a rebuff, and I am sure the annoyance and the terror he lived in must have greatly hastened his early and unhappy death.

All the time he lived with us the captain made no change whatever in his dress but to buy some stockings from a hawker. One of the cocks of his hat having fallen down, he let it hang from that day forth, though it was a great annoyance when it blew. I remember the appearance of his coat, which he patched himself up-stairs in his room, and which, before the end, was nothing but patches. He never wrote or received a letter, and he never spoke with any but the neighbours, and with these, for the most part, only when drunk on rum. The great sea-chest none of us had ever seen open.

He was only once crossed, and that was towards the end, when my poor father was far gone in a decline that took him off. Dr. Livesey came late one afternoon to see the patient, took a bit of dinner from my mother, and went into the parlour to smoke a pipe until his horse should come down from the hamlet, for we had no stabling at the old "Benbow." I followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright doctor, with his powder as white as snow, and his bright, black eyes and pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all, with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting far gone in rum, with his arms on the table. Suddenly he-the captain, that is-began to pipe up his eternal song:-

"Fifteen men on the dead man's chest-

Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!

Drink and the devil had done for the rest-

Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

At first I had supposed "the dead man's chest" to be that identical big box of his up-stairs in the front room, and the thought had been mingled in my nightmares with that of the one-legged seafaring man. But by this time we had all long ceased to pay any particular notice to the song; it was new, that night, to nobody but Dr. Livesey, and on him I observed it did not produce an agreeable effect, for he looked up for a moment quite angrily before he went on with his talk to old Taylor, the gardener, on a new cure for the rheumatics. In the meantime, the captain gradually brightened up at his own music, and at last flapped his hand upon the table before him in a way we all knew to mean-silence. The voices stopped at once, all but Dr. Livesey's; he went on as before, speaking clear and kind, and drawing briskly at his pipe between every word or two. The captain glared at him for a while, flapped his hand again, glared still harder, and at last broke out with a villainous, low oath: "Silence, there, between decks!"

"Were you addressing me, sir?" says the doctor; and when the ruffian had told him, with another oath, that this was so, "I have only one thing to say to you, sir," replies the doctor, "that if you keep on drinking rum, the world will soon be quit of a very dirty scoundrel!"

The old fellow's fury was awful. He sprang to his feet, drew and opened a sailor's clasp-knife, and, balancing it open on the palm of his hand, threatened to pin the doctor to the wall.

The doctor never so much as moved. He spoke to him, as before, over his shoulder, and in the same tone of voice; rather high, so that all the room might hear, but perfectly calm and steady:-

"If you do not put that knife this instant in your pocket, I promise, upon my honour, you shall hang at the next assizes."

Then followed a battle of looks between them; but the captain soon knuckled under, put up his weapon, and resumed his seat, grumbling like a beaten dog.

"And now, sir," continued the doctor, "since I now know there's such a fellow in my district, you may count I'll have an eye upon you day and night. I'm not a doctor only; I'm a magistrate; and if I catch a breath of complaint against you, if it's only for a piece of incivility like to-night's, I'll take effectual means to have you hunted down and routed out of this. Let that suffice."

Soon after Dr. Livesey's horse came to the door, and he rode away; but the captain held his peace that evening, and for many evenings to come.

chapter II

Black Dog Appears

and Disappears

It was not very long after this that there occurred the first of the mysterious events that rid us at last of the captain, though not, as you will see, of his affairs. It was a bitter cold winter, with long, hard frosts and heavy gales; and it was plain from the first that my poor father was little likely to see the spring. He sank daily, and my mother and I had all the inn upon our hands; and were kept busy enough, without paying much regard to our unpleasant guest.

It was one January morning, very early-a pinching, frosty morning-the cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones, the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to seaward. The captain had risen earlier than usual, and set out down the beach, his cutlass swinging under the broad skirts of the old blue coat, his brass telescope under his arm, his hat tilted back upon his head. I remember his breath hanging like smoke in his wake as he strode off, and the last sound I heard of him, as he turned the big rock, was a loud snort of indignation, as though his mind was still running upon Dr. Livesey.

Well, mother was up-stairs with father; and I was laying the breakfast-table against the captain's return, when the parlour door opened, and a man stepped in on whom I had never set my eyes before. He was a pale, tallowy creature, wanting two fingers of the left hand; and, though he wore a cutlass, he did not look much like a fighter. I had always my eye open for seafaring men, with one leg or two, and I remember this one puzzled me. He was not sailorly, and yet he had a smack of the sea about him too.

Continues...


Excerpted from Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson Copyright © 1998 by Robert Louis Stevenson. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction vii
Suggestions for Further Reading xxvii
Treasure Island
Part I The Old Buccaneer
I. The Old Sea Dog at the "Admiral Benbow" 3
II. Black Dog Appears and Disappears 9
III. The Black Spot 15
IV. The Sea-Chest 20
V. The Last of the Blind Man 25
VI. The Captain's Papers 30
Part II The Sea Cook
VII. I Go to Bristol 37
VIII. At the Sign of the "Spy-glass" 42
IX. Powder and Arms 47
X. The Voyage 52
XI. What I Heard in the Apple Barrel 57
XII. Council of War 62
Part III My Shore Adventure
XIII. How My Shore Adventure Began 69
XIV. The First Blow 74
XV. The Man of the Island 79
Part IV The Stockade
XVI. Narrative Continued by the Doctor: How the Ship Was Abandoned 87
XVII. Narrative Continued by the Doctor: The Jolly-boat's Last Trip 91
XVIII. Narrative Continued by the Doctor: End of the First Day's Fighting 95
XIX. Narrative Resumed by Jim Hawkins: The Garrison in the Stockade 99
XX. Silver's Embassy 104
XXI. The Attack 109
Part V My Sea Adventure
XXII. How My Sea Adventure Began 117
XXIII. The Ebb-tide Runs 122
XXIV. The Cruise of the Coracle 126
XXV. I Strike the Jolly Roger 131
XXVI. Israel Hands 136
XXVII. "Pieces of Eight" 143
Part VI Captain Silver
XXVIII. In the Enemy's Camp 151
XXIX. The Black Spot Again 158
XXX. On Parole 164
XXXI. The Treasure Hunt--Flint's Pointer 170
XXXII. The Treasure Hunt--The Voice among the Trees 176
XXXIII. The Fall of a Chieftain 181
XXXIV. And Last 186
Appendix A "My First Book" (1894) 191
Appendix B Tales of a Traveller 201
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 525 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(221)

4 Star

(120)

3 Star

(76)

2 Star

(36)

1 Star

(72)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 502 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 3, 2011

    Amazing!!

    Seriously this is an amazing story. Do not listen to bad reviews this book will absolutely captivate you. It isn't like the pathetically uncerebral books written today. If you can't handle big words... stick to Twilight. If you want something that will stimulate your imagination, I highly recommend this.

    50 out of 56 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 2, 2011

    Yeah, it's hard to read.

    I wish people would stop giving books bad reviews for the sole reason that they are hard to read. I mean, yeah it'll be hard to understand. This was back when average intelligence, or at least vocabulary, was way higher than it is now. The fact is this is a great book, that is why they call it a classic. I guess we've been so dumbed down that we resent anything that forces us to think a little harder than normal.

    38 out of 45 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 16, 2011

    great book, very worth it

    i just got my nook and was browsing when i found this. i have read it before, and i loved it. if you want to read something good, here you go. its a wonderful classic.

    16 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 27, 2011

    Good story but too many misspellings!

    Compared to the real book this downlaod has way too many misspellings. Sometimes instead of ltters symbols are used! Loved the story though.

    12 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 16, 2011

    must read

    My brother got this book on his kindle and I am soooo glad to get it for free on my nook color. I have to say,it is a must read. Enjoy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    9 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 22, 2010

    a childhood favorite

    ggreat book but not the best copy....lots of typos

    9 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2011

    So far.....this book is AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I can't stop reading it.

    I am on chapter 22 right now and so far, i love it! A lot of peeps die in this book in case you didn't read it yet. It's all about pirates and treasure and killing people(peeps are people!). ANYWAYS............I love this book. And I think you should read a book called The Call Of The Wild by Jack London. That is also one of my favorite books.

    7 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2012

    Typos galore

    The number of typos and "imperfections" was a distraction. And there were occasions where my enjoyment was diminished by trying to figure out what the word is.

    I recommend trying to get a "cleaner" version of this incredible story, it is worth the effort.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2012

    AWESOMEST BOOK EVER!!!!!!!

    This book was amazing. It is a must read for book fanatics. There are a few errors/spelling mistakes but it doesn't make the book less enjoyable. This is the best book i have read so far. Got to love the classics. If you are looking for a book filled with pirates and exciting adventures than this is the book to read.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2012

    DON'T GET IT

    It costs $0.99 and whenever I try to read it a little sign pops up that says sorry can't open this book I'm going to delete it after I write this review.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 15, 2010

    Lots and lots of typos

    So many, in fact, that actually trying to read this version of Treasure Island became so difficult, that I simply gave up. Now I am a bit leery of any 'free' downloads available for my Nook. Maybe it's true, that you get what you pay for. That's too bad, as the free downloads of classics was a selling point presented when I was buying my Nook.

    3 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2011

    Great story

    It was hard to read. It didn't down load in a book format

    2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2014

    Applications, Belong Here

    Include: <br>
    Name <br>
    Background <br>
    Species(Halfblood, Fallen Angel, Shifter, Werewolf, ect..) <br>
    Family(Parents) <br>
    And Years of Roleplaying <p>

    -Syprus-

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2013

    scottys says bad taste

    It uses itt and other words that make the book bad litratore

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2013

    I love this book

    I am 9yrs. Old I loved the Movie and the Book Get this book.
    I hope I was helpfull

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2013

    Aweful

    The book doesnt work

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2013

    Treasure Island

    There is a reason this book is an all time classic. It started adventure with buried treasure and pirates. It is a difficult read because it was written at a time when English was almost a different language. When pirates had their own vocabulary. In all a great adventure story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2013

    Kaya Kayla Cool

    Such a good book,fun and adventerest.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2013

    Jazmine

    Im 16 an wanna chat anybody out there???

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2013

    Love

    I mean the book is okay but the movie is better. But who cares about the plot the adventur is better. It is more awe to it but anyway love the book ,but the movie is better it is how I rool.

    [Look if u single caal back]

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 502 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)