Treasures of the Baseball Hall of Fame: The Official Companion to the Collection at Cooperstown

Overview

Every baseball fan knows that Cooperstown stands for the best of the history and tradition of the great game. For those fans who visit this village in upstate New York - 400,000 make the pilgrimage annually - and for those who cannot get there, John Thorn, baseball's foremost historian, has selected the Hall of Fame's most important artifacts. He has written about each piece and what it represents in the larger context of the game's history, and David Jordano has meticulously and lovingly photographed these ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (20) from $3.67   
  • New (2) from $60.56   
  • Used (18) from $3.67   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$60.56
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(214)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$105.00
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(240)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Every baseball fan knows that Cooperstown stands for the best of the history and tradition of the great game. For those fans who visit this village in upstate New York - 400,000 make the pilgrimage annually - and for those who cannot get there, John Thorn, baseball's foremost historian, has selected the Hall of Fame's most important artifacts. He has written about each piece and what it represents in the larger context of the game's history, and David Jordano has meticulously and lovingly photographed these treasures, capturing their essence perfectly.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
July 1998

July 26, 1998, is a day that will last forever in the mind of former baseball great Don Sutton. That day, Sutton will be inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Every player dreams of one day making it into the National Baseball Hall of Fame: It is the ultimate achievement in the sport.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York, officially opened on June 12, 1939, and it has been a mecca for baseball players and fans ever since. Every year more than 400,000 fans visit Cooperstown, where the Hall of Fame embraces the heroes of the game and preserves the priceless moments of baseball history.

John Thorn, baseball's foremost historian, takes readers on a tour of the legendary Cooperstown institution in his new book, Treasures of the Baseball Hall of Fame. Officially endorsed by the National Baseball Hall of Fame, this beautiful book features insightful text and 300 full-color photographs that capture the magic of baseball.

Among the artifacts of baseball history featured in this book are Cy Young's uniform, Hank Greenberg's bat, a base that Lou Brock stole, a ball Hank Aaron hit out, Babe Ruth's locker, and more. Treasures of the Baseball Hall of Fame is the premier souvenir for baseball fans across the country.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375501432
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 6/1/1998
  • Pages: 237
  • Product dimensions: 9.36 (w) x 11.77 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

John Thorn
JOHN THORN wrote his first baseball book twenty-five years ago.  Since then he has written and edited a great many more, among them The Hidden Game of Baseball, The Game for All America, and The Armchair Book of Baseball  With statistician Pete Palmer, he created the official encyclopedia of the game, Total Baseball, now in its fifth edition.  He was senior creative consultant to the Ken Burns film Baseball.

John Thorn is the publisher of Total Sports, a cross-platform sports-information company.  He lives in Kingston, New York.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Foreword
Acknowledgments
List of Illustrations
Introduction
Ch. 1 Why Cooperstown? 3
Ch. 2 The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum 10
Ch. 3 The Spur to Memory 14
Ch. 4 The Time Line 17
Ch. 5 Special Historical Exhibits 112
Ch. 6 The Changing Game 132
Ch. 7 Ballparks and Fans 149
Ch. 8 Special Achievements 155
Ch. 9 All-Star Games 167
Ch. 10 World Series 173
Ch. 11 The Art Gallery 182
Ch. 12 Movies, Music, and Media 190
Ch. 13 Baseball Cards, Games, and Memorabilia 209
Ch. 14 The National Baseball Hall of Fame Library and Archive 220
Ch. 15 The Hidden Hall of Fame 228
Read More Show Less

Interviews & Essays

Before the live bn.com chat, John Thorn agreed to answer some of our questions.

Q:  What are your thoughts on this year's Hall of Fame inductee Don Sutton and his five-year wait?

A:  It's hard to deny a spot in the Hall of Fame to any pitcher with 300 wins to his credit. The 300-win mark will become increasingly rare, what with five-man rotations and an increasing number of no-decision games as starters are pulled from games earlier and earlier, even when they are effective. Sutton's detractors have pointed to his lack of dominance in any particular season, but his longevity weighed heavily in his favor, as it did for Phil Niekro and may well do, one day, for Tommy John and Jim Kaat.

Q:  Do you think this year's Yankees team (61-20 at the All-Star break) is the best of the decade?

A:  Well, the Yanks are the best team for half a season in this decade. Let's wait to anoint them as the best of the decade until the season is over...and maybe until the decade is over. Writers and fans like superlatives, but this exercise can become pretty silly. At this writing, the Yanks are 64-20, matching the best record after 84 games of the 1902 Pirates, a team few of us recall because their victory pace slowed somewhat in the last months of the season.

Q:  What do you think about baseball expansion? Do you think it is diluting the pitching in baseball?

A:  Thirty-two teams is a natural number at which to slow expansion, because it will permit four leagues (or divisions) of eight teams each, or eight divisions of four teams each. Enhanced and extended postseason competition is good for the game, I believe, and the diluted quality of play is a temporary phenomenon. After all, in the 1920s, the supposed golden age of baseball, we were drawing on a population base in the U.S. of maybe 80 million, and neither African Americans nor Latin Americans, to any great extent, were permitted to play in the majors. Today the talent pool is much broader, the average level of play is far superior, and only statistical parity with earlier eras suggests equality or, perhaps, diminution of quality. Babe Ruth faced worse pitchers in 1927 than Mark McGwire or Ken Griffey do in 1998.

Q:  What was your favorite Hall of Fame acceptance speech? Is there any one speech that struck a personal chord with you? Why?

A:  Oh, I guess it would be Harmon Killebrew's speech, in which he told of his mother's scolding him and his playmates for ripping up the grass in the backyard with their ballplaying, and his father reprimanding her with these words: "We're raising kids, not raising grass." And Ted Williams's speech in 1966 was probably the most resonant for baseball fans and the Hall itself, with his advocacy of admitting the pre-Jackie Robinson black stars to the Hall so as not to double the injustice of the color bar.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)