Treasury of Fairy Tales

Treasury of Fairy Tales

3.3 3
by Naomi Lewis
     
 
Fairy Tales are a part of the fabric of childhood - a glorious heritage of stories to weave magic as they are passed down from generation to generation. The Ugly Duckling, Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, Snow White - this sumptuous collection brings together all the favorites from Brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen and Charles Perrault, and introduces the

Overview

Fairy Tales are a part of the fabric of childhood - a glorious heritage of stories to weave magic as they are passed down from generation to generation. The Ugly Duckling, Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, Snow White - this sumptuous collection brings together all the favorites from Brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen and Charles Perrault, and introduces the reader to some lesser- known treasures, such as Oscar Wilde's The Selfish Giant.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780760717912
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble
Publication date:
09/01/1999
Pages:
319
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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Treasury of Fairy Tales 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I bought this when my oldest was 4 and we read nearly every story together. Now I read it to her younger brother, and later...baby sister. Full of great retellings of classic fairy tales. Lovely illustrations too!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The old great standby classics. Every parent and child should hear these for the first time and again.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I bought this book, read the first story and promptly put it in the Salvation Army pile. The first story is Goldilocks And The Three Bears. Sadly, I guess the publishers felt that speaking of an intact family of bears might offend someone, so they chose instead to speak of 'A great big bear, a medium sized bear and a teeny tiny bear'. Also, they chose to make a moral judgement about Goldilocks' behavior. They said she was a 'bad girl' for going into the house uninvited. This is of course true, but I don't remember that part in the stories that were read to me as a child. I guess they felt parents or readers weren't able to make that judgement on their own, or that parents might not discuss her behavior. Isn't that the whole point of the story? I didn't bother to read the rest of the stories in the book, maybe there are some salvageable stories there.