A Treatise Concerning Political Enquiry And The Liberty Of The Press

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CHAPTER III. THE SUBJECT CONTINUED. Theory of mind—Philosophy of human conduct —Of the passions—Knoivledge their only cor- rective—Recapitulation—Society the parent of the sciences. TCHAP. He .perfect right of society to in- ...
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A Treatise Concerning Political Enquiry and the Liberty of the Press

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III. THE SUBJECT CONTINUED. Theory of mind—Philosophy of human conduct —Of the passions—Knoivledge their only cor- rective—Recapitulation—Society the parent of the sciences. TCHAP. He .perfect right of society to in- vestigate political subjects, becomes farther en- forced from a consideration of the theory ofmiai1, mind. By the very constitution of his nature man is an intelligent Being : every object by which he is surrounded, every principle which is presented to his understanding, necessarily become the subjects of his contemplation. When once reflection commences its career, who can determine the future extent of its re- searches ? Who can prescribe the topics it may venture to investigate, and those it shall be pro- hibited from examining ? Chap. Mind is the common property of man, and v-""v1 the capacity of knowledge is the inseparable attribute of mind. It is the constant prerogative of intellect to extend its researches into every subject. Thought springs spontaneously from the situation in which we are placed, the events by which we are affected, and the objects that are presented to our view? The succession of ideas is governed by the laws of necessary and irresistible causation. When once the intellectual train commences, its direction is not to be diverted, its force is not to be subdued ; we are led from subject to subject, and reflection pursues reflection, .with a rapidity and subtlety too astonishingly great to be grasped by the utmostvigilance of observation. To prescribe bounds to the empire of thought, would of all tasks be the most herculean. He who is aware of the intimate connection existing between ideas, and has perceived the astonishing subtlety of intellect: He who has investigated the doctrine of association, and been ta...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780217437356
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 8/14/2009
  • Pages: 108
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.22 (d)

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CHAPTER III. THE SUBJECT CONTINUED. Theory of mind—Philosophy of human conduct —Of the passions—Knoivledge their only cor- rective—Recapitulation—Society the parent of the sciences. TCHAP. He .perfect right of society to in- vestigate political subjects, becomes farther en- forced from a consideration of the theory ofmiai1, mind. By the very constitution of his nature man is an intelligent Being : every object by which he is surrounded, every principle which is presented to his understanding, necessarily become the subjects of his contemplation. When once reflection commences its career, who can determine the future extent of its re- searches ? Who can prescribe the topics it may venture to investigate, and those it shall be pro- hibited from examining ? Chap. Mind is the common property of man, and v-""v1 the capacity of knowledge is the inseparable attribute of mind. It is the constant prerogative of intellect to extend its researches into every subject. Thought springs spontaneously from the situation in which we are placed, the events by which we are affected, and the objects that are presented to our view? The succession of ideas is governed by the laws of necessary and irresistible causation. When once the intellectual train commences, its direction is not to be diverted, its force is not to be subdued ; we are led from subject to subject, and reflection pursues reflection, .with a rapidity and subtlety too astonishingly great to be grasped by the utmost vigilance of observation. To prescribe bounds to the empire of thought, would of all tasks be the most herculean. He who is aware of the intimate connection existing between ideas, and hasperceived the astonishing subtlety of intellect: He who has investigated the doctrine of association, and been ta...
Read More Show Less

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