A Tree for Emmy

( 1 )
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (8) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $11.10   
  • Used (4) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
Emmy liked all kind of trees but her favorite was the mimosa tree in her grandmother's backyard. She loved that tree because it was "stubborn and strong and little bit wild" just like her. For her birthday, Emmy wanted a mimosa tree but no one sold the wild trees with pink fuzz and seedpods that make a mess. Emmy was about to give up her quest until she found the perfect solution: a small mimosa sapling growing at her grandmother's. Her joy had a momentary setback when she realized she would have to wait for the little tree to grow to provide the pink fuzz and seedpods. But she decided to put a fence around the tree to keep it safe and vowed to water it faithfully until it grew "tall, stubborn strong and a little bit wild." Watercolor and collage illustrations with touches of pink and lots of charm perfectly relate Emmy's predicament. The whimsical tale is perfect for nature enthusiasts, makes an ideal Earth Day read, and carries a strong "green" message. The pink polka-dot endpapers add to the playfulness of the story. Reviewer: Beverley Fahey
School Library Journal

K-Gr 2

"Stubborn, strong, and a little bit wild." The words describe both Emmy's favorite tree and her demanding personality as she determinedly searches for her tree, one with fuzzy pink flowers. Willows, oaks, and pines just won't do. Emmy wants a marvelous mimosa like the one at her Gramma's house, but mimosa trees, like wildflowers, are not found in garden stores. Emmy's find is not quite expected-a sapling that will take years to mature, but her experience in searching is, like her tree, a growing one. Watercolor and collage illustrations feature lively cartoon figures and depict Emmy's vibrant world. The action comes to a full stop as the child has an up-close-and-personal encounter with her heart's desire.-Mary Elam, Forman Elementary School, Plano, TX

Kirkus Reviews
Freckled, red-haired Emmy loves trees-her grandmother's impressive mimosa in particular. She treasures its low branches, its fuzzy pink flowers and its rattling seedpods. Mai-Wyss's vibrant watercolor-and-collage illustrations show Emmy swinging, dancing, dreaming and playing beneath the mimosa while lyrical text describes her admiration with playful humor. "That ol' tree is a lot like you. Stubborn and strong and a little bit wild," Gramma says. For her birthday, Emmy asks for a mimosa of her own, but the stores don't sell wild trees, and she has to find another way to make one her own. The baby mimosa she discovers doesn't have low branches, pink flowers and seedpods-at least not yet. What is a tree-loving tomboy to do? A spunky and independent heroine, a satisfying story and a gentle environmental message combine nicely here in an arboreal celebration that will delight many a young reader. A fine introduction to the pleasures of trees, well suited for group and home reading. (Picture book. 4-8)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781561454754
  • Publisher: Peachtree Publishers, Ltd.
  • Publication date: 3/1/2009
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 1,439,784
  • Age range: 4 - 7 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.60 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 28, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    My thoughts: The book presents an interesting lesson about vari

    My thoughts: The book presents an interesting lesson about variety of trees. Note: it is not a tree book or a truly instructional book about trees, leaves, seeds, etc. The story revolves around Emmy, a little girl full of energy and who her grandmother describes as stubborn and wild. Grandmother also describes the Mimosa tree as stubborn and wild. Describing a will-growing tree that is hard to get rid of is one thing. To describe a child as stubborn and wild and consider it a positive trait is hard to understand as a favorable trait.

    It is true that stubbornness in a child is indicative of a strong will which when guided and tempered with control can lead to a strong leader in adult life. However, to praise a child for being stubborn and wild without tempering it with controls and leadership by the adults in the child's life can only lead to an adult that is a loose cannon and that is a destructive leader.

    Now the story is cute in that Emmy wants one of the pretty Mimosa trees (I, too, think they are beautiful and wouldn't mind having one in my yard.). So that is what Emmy asks for as her birthday present. She and her parents look and look but cannot find one to purchase since they are considered "wild" trees. They return to grandmother's and Emmy finds a little, tiny shoot of a Mimosa tree which they dig up and take home to plant. Emmy learns that she must protect her new seedling and care for it even though it is a wild tree.

    As I said, the story is cute and Emmy learns a little about trees and young trees. The book is pretty and the illustrations are very nice. Emmy looks like a loveable and delectably irresistible child. I can see the book being used to teach the tenacity of wild trees and how they are stubbornly difficult to rid oneself of. I can also see object lessons on stubbornness in a child being drawn from the story by astute adults.

    DISCLOSURE: I received a complimentary copy of A Tree for Emmy" from Peachtree Publishers in exchange for my honest review. Opinions expressed are solely my own.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)