×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Tree gossip
     

Tree gossip

by Francis George Heath
 
Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
Birds as Planters. A ANY noble trees owe their existence in parti- / cular places to the planter Bird, which, like 'the joiner squirrel,' does good by stealth and quite

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
Birds as Planters. A ANY noble trees owe their existence in parti- / cular places to the planter Bird, which, like 'the joiner squirrel,' does good by stealth and quite unintentionally. Rooks have been seen carefully burying Fir cones, and acorns also. How wise and thoughtful a provision! the simple observer of nature might exclaim. But the Bird is merely following a natural instinct. He buries that he may find again, and then either forgets his hidden store or arrives too late to make it of use. The squirrel, and indeed all nut-loving or seed-loving animals and Birds, perform the same office uncon-. sciously. They carry their stores to what they believe to be secure hiding-places, and then forget them, and the germs germinate and spring up. Nature has it, however, in view distinctly to turn bird and animal instincts to her wise purposes. She colours fruits and surrounds seeds with juicy, attractive pulp, that Birds and animals may distribute the enclosed germs. The pulp is partly for the protection of the seeds it encompasses ; but it is mainly a bait. Bog Wood. fA OST curious is the effect upon wood of long / immersion in a bog. It becomes hard, oftentimes black, but not with decay, and is of marvellous durability. In Ireland the manufacture of ornaments from Bog Timber is quite an active industry; and the presence of large quantities of wood in bogs is proof of the forestal character of a country which is now almost denuded of trees. The wood dug up from peat which marks the former existence of bog-land, or from the moister depths of actually existent bog, is mainly Alder, Birch, Hazel, Oak, Scotch Pine, and Yew; and it is particularly curious that whilst the Alder, Birch, and Hazel dug up are commonly so soft and pulpy as to be positively useless—unless, perhaps, wh...

Product Details

BN ID:
2940026026593
Publisher:
Field & Tuer, The Leadenhall Press
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
246 KB

Read an Excerpt


Birds as Planters. A ANY noble trees owe their existence in parti- / cular places to the planter Bird, which, like 'the joiner squirrel,' does good by stealth and quite unintentionally. Rooks have been seen carefully burying Fir cones, and acorns also. How wise and thoughtful a provision! the simple observer of nature might exclaim. But the Bird is merely following a natural instinct. He buries that he may find again, and then either forgets his hidden store or arrives too late to make it of use. The squirrel, and indeed all nut-loving or seed-loving animals and Birds, perform the same office uncon-. sciously. They carry their stores to what they believe to be secure hiding-places, and then forget them, and the germs germinate and spring up. Nature has it, however, in view distinctly to turn bird and animal instincts to her wise purposes. She colours fruits and surrounds seeds with juicy, attractive pulp, that Birds and animals may distribute the enclosed germs. The pulp is partly for the protection of the seeds it encompasses ; but it is mainly a bait. Bog Wood. fA OST curious is the effect upon wood of long / immersion in a bog. It becomes hard, oftentimes black, but not with decay, and is of marvellous durability. In Ireland the manufacture of ornaments from Bog Timber is quite an active industry; and the presence of large quantities of wood in bogs is proof of the forestal character of a country which is now almost denuded of trees. The wood dug up from peat which marks the former existence of bog-land, or from the moister depths of actually existent bog, is mainly Alder, Birch, Hazel, Oak, Scotch Pine, and Yew; and it is particularly curious that whilst the Alder, Birch, andHazel dug up are commonly so soft and pulpy as to be positively uselessunless, perhaps, wh...

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews