A Tree Is a Plant

A Tree Is a Plant

by Clyde Robert Bulla, Stacey Schuett
     
 

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A tree is the biggest plant that grows.

Trees can live for a very long time, and they are alive all year long, even when they look dead in winter.

In this newly illustrated book, you will learn how a tree grows and how it gets food and water. You can also find out what happens to water after it travels through a tree's roots, branches, and

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Overview

A tree is the biggest plant that grows.

Trees can live for a very long time, and they are alive all year long, even when they look dead in winter.

In this newly illustrated book, you will learn how a tree grows and how it gets food and water. You can also find out what happens to water after it travels through a tree's roots, branches, and leaves, and how to figure out a tree's age.

Clyde Robert Bulla's simple and concise text and Stacey Schuett's lush illustrations follow a tree's continuous life cycle through spring, summer, winter, and fall.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-A newly illustrated version of a 1960 publication. Although the title and beginning pages indicate a broad look at trees, the focus is on the apple tree. Through impressionistic paintings and a simple text, the book describes its seasonal cycle. Bulla discusses the parts of the tree and their functions without complex explanations of the mechanisms involved in fruit formation, photosynthesis, etc. "The blossoms last only a few days.-The apples are where the blossoms were before." Concepts such as water intake are emphasized with arrows indicating its route within the plant. The charming paintings, many of which are full-page and large enough for comfortable group sharing, depict numerous outdoor scenes peopled by children of various ethnic backgrounds. An appended section includes instructions for a transpiration experiment and suggests a method for measuring the age of a tree. Gail Saunders-Smith's Apple Trees (Bridgestone, 1998), illustrated with photos, also takes a seasonal approach, but it has a more controlled vocabulary and contains much less information than Bulla's book. Saunders-Smith's From Blossom to Fruit (Pebble, 1998) is exclusively about apple formation, with a very simplified vocabulary and close-up color photos.-Lynda Ritterman, Atco Elementary School, Waterford, NJ Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Glowing new illustrations featuring a multiracial cast of children adorn this classic "Let's Read and Find Out Science" primer, first published in 1960. Using plain language and short sentences, Bulla follows an apple tree from seed to maturity, introducing readers to leaves, flowers, branches, roots, and fruits-all of which are depicted in thickly brushed but recognizable detail in Schuett's (Night Lights, 2000, etc.) outdoorsy scenes. It's a staid but still useful introduction, and budding botanists will "Find Out" more from the two experiments and a short reading list at the end. (Picture book/nonfiction. 6-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780064451963
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/28/2001
Series:
Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science Series: Stage 1
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
215,013
Product dimensions:
9.81(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.09(d)
Lexile:
AD290L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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