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TREES AND HOW TO PAINT THEM IN WATERCOLOURS - This ebook is designed to help you get the most out of painting trees to enable you to become a better artist!
     

TREES AND HOW TO PAINT THEM IN WATERCOLOURS - This ebook is designed to help you get the most out of painting trees to enable you to become a better artist!

by W.H.J. Boot
 
TREES AND HOW TO PAINT
THEM IN WATERCOLOURS

Calling all Artists and Painters, do you have trouble painting trees and foliage?
Do your paintings never seem to look right?
Are you spending hours painting leaves only for your paintings to STILL look lifeless and flat?

Well help is at hand with this BRAND NEW (July 2005) Ebook ........

Overview

TREES AND HOW TO PAINT
THEM IN WATERCOLOURS

Calling all Artists and Painters, do you have trouble painting trees and foliage?
Do your paintings never seem to look right?
Are you spending hours painting leaves only for your paintings to STILL look lifeless and flat?

Well help is at hand with this BRAND NEW (July 2005) Ebook ........

TREES and HOW to paint them in Watercolours!

Learn how to paint . . .

The Oak Tree
The Beech Tree
The Willow Tree
The Elm
The Ash &
The Scotch Fir
Learn which brushes, paints and pencils are best and why.
Learn how to build up your paintings piece by piece to acheive the results you really want.
Learn what to draw or paint and what NOT to draw or paint and why!

Learn how to get your paintings right from the beginning and transform your painting skills. This ebook includes many two-stage pictures showing you exactly HOW to paint trees properly. It also includes black and white close up sketches of each trees individual leaves.

This is an excellent BRAND NEW ebook designed to help you get the most out of painting trees to enable you to become a better artist!

SNEAK PEAK:

TREES AND HOW TO PAINT THEM IN WATERCOLOURS

INDEX
Page 3 – Introduction
Page 7 – The Oak
Page 17 – The Elm
Page 24 – The Ash
Page 25 – The Scotch Fir
Page 31 – The Willow
Page 32 – The Beech

"I DON'T know how it is, but I can't do trees" is a remark an artist frequently hears; and it is too often justified by the poor and crude attempts at tree painting that accompany it.
And to the regretful exclamation perhaps something is added about "want of knack" the "right sort of touch" as though, in order to successfully draw or paint a tree (as distinct from the painting of any other object) some extraordinary gift or sleight of hand were necessary, some special cleverness of manipulation that should enable its possessor to accomplish "tree-work" perhaps without effort, and certainly without very much study.
"I'm very fond of out-door sketching, nothing is so nice; and although I love trees, and have tried to paint them many times, somehow or other I can't manage it," continues the disconsolate artist. This idea of natural inability in regard to tree-painting perhaps becomes in him a settled conviction and he goes floundering on for of course he cannot give up his sketching, blotting in his trees with meaningless and inartistic dabs (which by-and-by become his recipe) and from this very hopelessness, making little or no attempt at reproducing the forms, which, as a matter of fact, he sees quite plainly, and is perfectly conscious of.
Now, this theory of spontaneous foliage-cleverness we entirely disagree with. Of course a natural love of art is quite essential to success in any kind of painting, but we hold that, given the artistic ability, it is just as capable of being turned in the direction of tree-painting as in any other; and with success, if only the study of tree form be set about in a right manner and with conviction.
"Freedom of handling" we are told, and "lightness of touch" are necessary to tree-painting. This is undoubtedly true, for a tree is an object that is continually on the move, swayed by the wind first one way and then the other and through which a bird can fly. It is only with certain dexterity that this appearance of life and motion can be given.
But "freedom of handling" is only another name for that sureness of brush which results from practice, and from the knowledge obtained by the mastery of the subject from its elemental stages upwards. When painting a tree it should always be kept in mind and never forgotten, that it is a tree, composed of delicate, feathery leaves, and not a solid, immovable substance like brick or stone. It ought to be the painter's aim to portray the quality and material of the tree as well as its form and colour.
Remembering these all-important matters, the dexterity will come in time; and to the sketcher who has tried and failed and to the novice who is not yet conscious of his power and is uncertain how to shape his course or what method to pursue, we would say, "Start at the beginning; do not think any bit of tree form too trivial for study, or any labour too great.
In this book we are learning to paint trees in water-colour, but we would advise the pupil, in order to make himself thoroughly conversant with the character and formation of the different kinds, to execute careful studies of them with pen and ink and under all conditions of leafage.
By this means, as he has no medium but black and white to work with.

TO BE CONTINUED... Buy now and enjoy the content in full!

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013622418
Publisher:
S.H.W.
Publication date:
08/27/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
5 MB

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