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Trent's Last Case
     

Trent's Last Case

3.7 11
by E.C. Bentley
 

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When a scheming American capitalist is found dead in the garden of his English country house, two immediate matters confound amateur detective Philip Trent: why is the dead man not wearing his false teeth and why is his young widow seemingly relieved at his death? The newly widowed Mabel Manderson, ‘The Lady in Black’, has a disarming effect on the

Overview

When a scheming American capitalist is found dead in the garden of his English country house, two immediate matters confound amateur detective Philip Trent: why is the dead man not wearing his false teeth and why is his young widow seemingly relieved at his death? The newly widowed Mabel Manderson, ‘The Lady in Black’, has a disarming effect on the refreshingly fallible and imaginative Trent, in this classic detective story that twists and turns as a result of the irresistible combination of ingenious deductions and misplaced assumptions.

Editorial Reviews

Dorothy L Sayers
It is the one detective story of the present century which I am certain will go down to posterity as a classic. It is a masterpiece.
Agatha Christie
One of the three best detective stories ever written.
New York Times
One of the few classics of detective fiction.
Encyclopedia Mysteriosa
Bentley's 1912 mystery masterpiece, Trent's Last Case, which introduced Philip Trent, a fallible, human detective with reconizable emotions, was astounding for its time and still stands up well today.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780755115839
Publisher:
House of Stratus, Incorporated
Publication date:
05/30/2001
Series:
Philip Trent Series , #1
Edition description:
New edition
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.07(h) x 0.59(d)

What People are Saying About This

Jon L. Breen
One of the first important modern detective novels was E.C. Bentley's Trent's Last Case, often cited as the precursor of the Golden Age. The impact of the world war may have delayed Bentley's influence from being fully felt before the next decade.

Meet the Author

E.C. Bentley was born in 1875 and educated at St Paul’s School, London, where he met eminent critic and author G K Chesterton, who became his closest friend.

Bentley began a lifelong career in journalism in 1902, working for ten years on the editorial staff of the Daily News and for a further twenty years on the Daily Telegraph. In 1905, he published ‘Biography for Beginners’ (under the pseudonym E Clerihew), which was a volume of nonsense verse consisting of four-lines and called ‘Clerihews’ (in his honour), which became as popular as the limerick form. Two further volumes followed in 1929 and 1939.

Bentley’s masterpiece, ‘Trent’s Last Case’ (1913), was written in exasperation at the infallibility of Sherlock Holmes and marked the beginning of a new era in detective fiction. Indeed, it has long been hailed as marking the start of the 'Golden Age of Crime Fiction' and the first truly modern mystery. The sequel, ‘Trent’s Own Case’, did not appear for a further twenty three years and this was then followed by a book of short stories; ‘Trent Intervenes’.

Of ‘Trent's Last Case’ Agatha Christie wrote: 'One of the three best detective stories ever written’, whilst Dorothy L Sayers stated ‘It is the one detective story of the present century which I am certain will go down to posterity as a classic. It is a masterpiece’.

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Trent's Last Case 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very convoluted. Just when it's solved it isn't.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Philip Trent, gentleman and sometime reporter, takes on the case of solving the murder of millionaire Sigsbee Manderson at his country estate. Along the way he makes the fatal mistake of falling for the beautiful widow, who may or may not know more than she's telling. And even when Trent thinks he finally has it all figured out, there remains at least one more twist. This is a phenomenal example of the Golden Age of Mystery, when writers were trying to break from the model of the invincible detective, ala Sherlock Holmes. There really is nothing to dislike in this clever book. Highly recommended for any lover of mysteries.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am an avid reader and like to think that I can at least see the end of most books and their final outcome. Not so here, not so here. Though I figured out how it was done I totally missed so much else of the who's and the why's. I'm not so smart as I thought I was. Absolutely Refreshing!
jamesmorrisCA More than 1 year ago
To many characters, otherwise a good story. Jamesmorris
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Stan0522 More than 1 year ago
An old mystery in some old fashioned wording.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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