×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Trio 99>00
     

Trio 99>00

by Pat Metheny Trio
 
Guitarist Pat Metheny is doing some of the best work of his career these days, particularly when it comes to his more straight-ahead jazz work. On TRIO 99-00, Metheny's flanked by bassist Larry Grenadier and drummer Bill Stewart, a solid and supportive rhythm team that provides an uncluttered foundation on which the leader can roam. Metheny, on both electric and

Overview

Guitarist Pat Metheny is doing some of the best work of his career these days, particularly when it comes to his more straight-ahead jazz work. On TRIO 99-00, Metheny's flanked by bassist Larry Grenadier and drummer Bill Stewart, a solid and supportive rhythm team that provides an uncluttered foundation on which the leader can roam. Metheny, on both electric and acoustic guitars, displays his spectacular technique and distinctive harmonic approach on lyrical originals and well chosen outside material. If the leader's dashing playing remains in the spotlight, the session never degenerates into a basic blowing session. Obvious thought has gone into the project: Coltrane's "Giant Steps," usually used as a chance for players to display their massive chops at dashing speed, is slowed down and given a bridge, lending the piece an entirely different feel; an unlikely standard, "A Lot of Livin' to Do" from "Bye Bye Birdie" is both reharmonized and reconceived in terms of tempo, while the trio's take on Wayne Shorter's "Capricorn" confers new life to an overlooked gem. Two Metheny ballads -- "We Had a Sister" (first heard on Joshua Redman's WISH) and "Travels" (a Lyle Mays collaboration originally recorded on the live album TRAVELS) -- feature poetic acoustic guitar readings, displaying the pensive atmosphere that Metheny carefully builds to balance his more spectacular instrumental flights.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Richard S. Ginell
Mixing up his pitches just to keep his fans off balance as always, Metheny returns to the strict jazz-guitar trio format for the first time in a decade, in league with a couple of combative, unintimidated partners. At the age of 45, Metheny leaves no doubt that he has become a masterful jazz player, thoroughly at home with even the most convoluted bebop licks ("What Do You Want?") yet still as open as ever to ideas outside the narrow mainstream, as illustrated in the country-western-tinged phrasing on "The Sun in Montreal." Bassist Larry Grenadier propels his own voice prominently into the texture, even when walking the fours, and drummer Bill Stewart does not hesitate to go against the grain of Metheny's ideas. There is a slow, almost bossa nova-like take on "Giant Steps" that works unexpectedly well; it actually becomes a lyrical, gliding thing. Bye Bye Birdie's "Got a Lot of Livin' to Do" gets a rare contemporary cover, and why not? it's a good tune that holds up, even when fractured as creatively as it is here. There are also a few songs on acoustic guitar that sound like embryonic soundtrack material: "Just Like the Day," "We Had a Sister," and "Travels," the latter being Metheny's first studio recording of a tune that was recorded live 17 years before. Metheny's brigade of jazz buffs will savor this.

Product Details

Release Date:
02/08/2000
Label:
Warner Bros / Wea
UPC:
0093624763222
catalogNumber:
47632
Rank:
36717

Tracks

Album Credits

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews