Trio of Sorcery

( 39 )

Overview

New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Mercedes Lackey presents three exciting short urban fantasy novels featuring three resourceful heroines and three different takes on the modern world and on magics both modern and ancient.

Arcanum 101:  Diana Tregarde, practicing witch, romance novelist, Guardian of the Earth. Studying at Harvard, Diana is approached by Joe O’Brian, a young cop who has already seen more than one unusual thing during his budding ...

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Trio of Sorcery

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Overview

New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Mercedes Lackey presents three exciting short urban fantasy novels featuring three resourceful heroines and three different takes on the modern world and on magics both modern and ancient.

Arcanum 101:  Diana Tregarde, practicing witch, romance novelist, Guardian of the Earth. Studying at Harvard, Diana is approached by Joe O’Brian, a young cop who has already seen more than one unusual thing during his budding career. The distraught mother of a kidnap victim is taking advice from a “psychic” and interfering in the police investigation. Will Diana prove that the psychic is a fake? Unfortunately, the psychic is not a fake, but a very wicked witch—and the child’s kidnapper. 

Drums:  Jennifer Talldeer, shaman, private investigator, member of the Osage tribe. Most of Jennie’s work is regular PI stuff, but Nathan Begay brings her a problem she’s never seen before. His girlfriend, Caroline, is Chickasaw to his Navaho, but that’s not the problem. Somehow, Caroline has attracted the attention of an angry Osage ghost. Thwarted in love while alive, the ghost has chosen Caroline to be his bride in death. 

Ghost in the Machine:  Ellen McBride: computer programmer extraordinaire, techno-shaman. The programmers and players of a new MMORPG find that the game’s “boss,” a wendigo, is “killing” everyone—even the programmers’ characters with their god-like powers. A brilliant debugger, Ellen discoveres that the massive computing power of the game’s servers have created a breach between the supernatural world and our own. This wendigo isn’t a bit of code, it’s the real thing . . . and it’s on the brink of breaking out of the computers and into the real world. 

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Sure to please Lackey fans… All three tales once again demonstrate that Lackey is a master storyteller, no matter the story’s length.” 

RT Book Reviews, 4 ½ stars

“Lackey’s well-seasoned talents for good storytelling and character development are on full display here.” 

Booklist

“The three novellas are well written and entertaining while starring strong females with similar traits but different scenarios confronting the supernatural.” 

The Midwest Book Review

“A great mix of urban and paranormal fantasy.” 

Book Chick City

Publishers Weekly
Powerful women solve magical mysteries in this trio of short urban fantasy novels from the enormously prolific Lackey (The Phoenix Transformed). Fans of the Diana Tregarde series will welcome prequel story "Arcanum 101," in which Diana, a Harvard freshman in the early 1970s, must secretly work as a sorceress Guardian and investigate a psychic involved in a kidnapping case. "Drums" returns to the setting of 1994's "Sacred Ground," where Native American sleuth and medicine woman Jennie Talldeer must find a way to deter an angry Osage ghost determined to claim a living bride. In the standout "Ghost in the Machine," techno-shaman Ellen McBridge moves between the real world and that of an online role-playing game to debug a magical monster that's not behaving quite as programmed. This volume is a worthy addition to the urban fantasy bookshelf. (Oct.)
Library Journal
The first new Diana Tregarde story in almost 20 years and the first Jenny Talldeer tale in over 15 years set the stage for an introduction to a remarkable new urban fantasy heroine in this collection of three urban fantasy novels by the best-selling author of the Valdemar series. In Arcanum 101, which takes place in the 1970s, a young Diana Tregarde finds time between her studies at Harvard and her budding writing career to stop a supposed psychic from interfering in the police investigation of a kidnapping case. Drums, set in the 1990s, sends PI and Native American shaman Jennie Talldeer on a quest to prevent an angry Osage ghost from coming between Navajo Nathan Begay and his Chickasaw fiancée. In Ghost in the Machine, set in the high-tech world of modern times, computer programmer and techno-shaman Ellen McBridge investigates a series of mysterious deaths linked to a multiplayer online role-playing game. VERDICT Lackey's urban fantasies always reflect her keen sense of time and place, and her vivid characters and respect for other cultures make her a standout storyteller with a broad-based audience. Lackey's fans and urban fantasy readers will want this.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780765334428
  • Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
  • Publication date: 4/9/2013
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 785,957
  • Product dimensions: 5.74 (w) x 8.08 (h) x 0.98 (d)

Meet the Author

Mercedes Lackey is the author of the bestselling Valdemar series, the Obsidian Trilogy (The Outstretched Shadow, To Light a Candle, and When Darkness Falls), the Enduring Flame trilogy (The Phoenix Unchained, The Phoenix Endangered, and The Phoenix Transformed), and the Tales of the Five Hundred Kingdoms. She has written many other books, including Phoenyx and Ashes, Sacred Ground, The Firebird, The Fairy Godmother, and Alta. Lackey is the co-author, with Andre Norton, of the Halfblood Chronicles, including Elvenborn. Mercedes Lackey was born in Chicago and graduated from Purdue University. She has worked as an artist’s model, a computer programmer, and for American Airlines, and has written lyrics and recorded more than fifty songs. She lives in Oklahoma.

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Read an Excerpt

TRIO OF SORCERY (Chapter One)

This is the first Diana Tregarde story in decades. And in a sense this is the first Diana Tregarde story, period.

It takes place in the early 1970s and it will be hard for anyone younger than thirty to realize what a very different world that was. Computers were the size of buildings. We were still putting men on the moon, but there is more computing power in a common iPhone than there was at all of Cape Kennedy. Watergate was about to happen. Nixon hadn’t yet resigned. U.S. soldiers were still fighting and dying in Vietnam. There was no such thing as being “openly gay.” There also was no such thing as HIV.

Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Brian Jones were all recently dead of various self-indulgences, but John Lennon was still alive.

The only time you saw windmills was on a farm or in Holland.

Gas was twenty-five cents a gallon, threatening to go up to thirty.

No one had ever heard of, much less seen, a Japanese manga.

Britney Spears wasn’t even born. Neither was Leonardo DiCaprio.

Stand-up comedians only performed in nightclubs with bad reputations, or in Las Vegas. No one would consider going out for a night of comedy.

There was no MTV. Anytime there was a rock-themed television program, it was an event. There was barely cable TV. Most people made do with three channels and what was not yet called PBS. When you had cable TV, you had a whole twelve channels!

“Portable” music was via a transistor radio.

No one had ever heard of rap. And if anyone had heard a rap song, they would have considered it a quaint offshoot of beat poetry, which was so, so 1950s.

You bought most of your reading material at the drugstore from revolving racks, or digest-size monthly fiction magazines in a small magazine rack, unless you were really lucky and were in a town big enough to actually have a bookstore.

Research meant going to the library and looking things up in books.

So as you read this, if you find yourself thinking, “Well, why didn’t they just—” the answer is probably, “Because they didn’t have it then.”

Enjoy.

TRIO OF SORCERY Copyright © 2010 by Mercedes Lackey

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First Chapter

Trio of Sorcery


By Mercedes Lackey

Tor Books

Copyright © 2010 Mercedes Lackey
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780765328519

TRIO OF SORCERY (Chapter One)

This is the first Diana Tregarde story in decades. And in a sense this is the first Diana Tregarde story, period.

It takes place in the early 1970s and it will be hard for anyone younger than thirty to realize what a very different world that was. Computers were the size of buildings. We were still putting men on the moon, but there is more computing power in a common iPhone than there was at all of Cape Kennedy. Watergate was about to happen. Nixon hadn’t yet resigned. U.S. soldiers were still fighting and dying in Vietnam. There was no such thing as being “openly gay.” There also was no such thing as HIV.

Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Brian Jones were all recently dead of various self-indulgences, but John Lennon was still alive.

The only time you saw windmills was on a farm or in Holland.

Gas was twenty-five cents a gallon, threatening to go up to thirty.

No one had ever heard of, much less seen, a Japanese manga.

Britney Spears wasn’t even born. Neither was Leonardo DiCaprio.

Stand-up comedians only performed in nightclubs with bad reputations, or in Las Vegas. No one would consider going out for a night of comedy.

There was no MTV. Anytime there was a rock-themed television program, it was an event. There was barely cable TV. Most people made do with three channels and what was not yet called PBS. When you had cable TV, you had a whole twelve channels!

“Portable” music was via a transistor radio.

No one had ever heard of rap. And if anyone had heard a rap song, they would have considered it a quaint offshoot of beat poetry, which was so, so 1950s.

You bought most of your reading material at the drugstore from revolving racks, or digest-size monthly fiction magazines in a small magazine rack, unless you were really lucky and were in a town big enough to actually have a bookstore.

Research meant going to the library and looking things up in books.

So as you read this, if you find yourself thinking, “Well, why didn’t they just—” the answer is probably, “Because they didn’t have it then.”

Enjoy.

TRIO OF SORCERY Copyright © 2010 by Mercedes Lackey



Continues...

Excerpted from Trio of Sorcery by Mercedes Lackey Copyright © 2010 by Mercedes Lackey. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 39 )
Rating Distribution

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(15)

4 Star

(8)

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(10)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 39 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 28, 2011

    If I Could Rate with Negative Numbers, I Would

    Mercedes Lackey, long the bastion of treating people like human beings has created a level of fail in her Diane Tregarde story that has left me nauseated and in tears. I am not sure I will even be able to read the 2nd and 3rd stories in this book as I no longer trust her as a storyteller. I was so excited to have a new Tregarde story but I now wish she had left this universe alone. If you have always admired Lackey for having openly gay, normal people as characters in her books, then, walk away now.

    Really, I have no words to express the level of disgust that I feel towards Lackey at this point. I do know that I will never purchase another one of her books again.

    10 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 16, 2011

    I Loved All 3 Stories

    I almost did not bother with this after reading a rather scathing review regarding the Diana Tregarde story. To that reviewer, I can only say that everyone has their own interpretations and while I can accept that you were unhappy with the story and it's ending revelation, I was not. I found it tragic and sad but certainly not any sort of attack on any group of people. You have to keep in mind the time that this story was set in and keep in mind that a good writter realizes that their villians can come from any sort of background or group. To not accept that is as bad as singling out a specific group as being the "source of evil". To anyone considering reading this book, I would say: If you enjoyed Lackey's other Tregarde books and if you enjoyed the Jennifer Talldeer setting, then you will probably enjoy these stories too. If uncertain, get it from your local library to try out before buying it.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 29, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    The three novellas are well written and entertaining

    "Arcanum 101". Diana Tregarde is just starting college, but also is a Guardian witch dedicated to keeping mortals safe from nasty supernaturals. She makes friends with four other students who reside in the same building she does. They saw her banish a dybbuk; but rather than fearing her, they offer to assist her in finding a kidnapped little girl. There only clues come from the fortune teller advising the distraught mother, but the Harvard freshman Guardian believes the woman practices the dark arts.

    "Drums". Nathan Begay, the new client of private investigators Jennifer Talldeer and David Spirited Horse, hires them to follow his girlfriend Caroline. She does not want to see him or any of her friends. Caroline seems lifeless as of her soul has been drained from her. Jenny observes Caroline dancing with a ghost; a raging evil spirit who died without honor or love and has chosen Caroline as his death bride.

    "Ghost in the Machine". Tom Bishop was intimately involved with the MMORPG (multi-player online game); he helped create another zone to the game. Dark Valley is very popular, but the programmed Wendigo is doing things outside the coding and Tom cannot stop him doing what it wants. The programmers hire Ellen McBridge to fix the flaw. She uses shaman magic to try to get the ghost out of the machine.

    The returns of Diane Tregarde (early 1990s; see Children of the Night and Burning Water) and Jennifer Talldeer (mid 1990s; see Scared Ground) will elate fans of Mercedes Lackey. While this is Ellen McBridge's first tale, she holds her own with the other two paranormal investigators. The three novellas are well written and entertaining while starring strong females with similar traits but different scenarios confronting the supernatural.

    Harriet Klausner

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 15, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Good quick reads

    3 stories, good quick reads. I bought this book because of the Dianna Tregarde story. Loved all the novels and wanted to read this prequel. Did not dissapoint. The other two stories...good, but not great. Still I am pleased with the purchase...my 1st NookColor purchase!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2013

    Fun Fantasy/Paranormal Anthology

    "Trio of Sorcery" contains three distinct novellas, united by their common magical/paranormal theme. The characters are well-developed, the magical meanies are scary, and the heroes do whatever they have to do to save the day. I enjoyed all three, though I admit to being a bit lost by some of the technical speak in final tale (techno-shamanism is not my forte).

    Recommended to fans of Mercedes Lackey, Jim Butcher and Natasha Hoar.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 30, 2011

    Entertaining

    It was nice to see Ms. Talldeer again and being a gamer, I loved the last story a lot!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2013

    Very nice to have a new story on a one book character

    Mercedes Lackey always hss great stories

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