Triptych

( 119 )

Overview

"In the city of Atlanta, young women are dying - at the hands of a killer who signs his work with a single, chilling act of mutilation. Leaving behind enough evidence to fuel a frenzied police hunt, this cunning madman is bringing together dozens of disparate lives. And in this new novel, Karin Slaughter plunges us into their midst ... as investigators, bystanders, and one very guilty man become part of a harrowing, unpredictable drama - and the shocking truths it will expose." From Atlanta's wealthiest suburbs to its stark inner-city housing
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Triptych

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Overview

"In the city of Atlanta, young women are dying - at the hands of a killer who signs his work with a single, chilling act of mutilation. Leaving behind enough evidence to fuel a frenzied police hunt, this cunning madman is bringing together dozens of disparate lives. And in this new novel, Karin Slaughter plunges us into their midst ... as investigators, bystanders, and one very guilty man become part of a harrowing, unpredictable drama - and the shocking truths it will expose." From Atlanta's wealthiest suburbs to its stark inner-city housing projects, a killer has crossed the boundaries of wealth and race. And the people who are chasing him must cross those boundaries, too. Among them is Michael Ormewood, a veteran detective whose marriage is hanging by a thread - and whose arrogance and explosive temper are threatening his career. And Angie Polaski, a beautiful vice cop who was once Michael's lover before she became his enemy. But unbeknownst to both of them, another player has entered the game: a loser ex-con who has stumbled upon the killer's trail in the most coincidental of ways - and who may be the key to breaking the case wide open.
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  • Karin Slaughter
    Karin Slaughter  

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Most Atlantans ignored or were repelled by the sadistic killing of the young black prostitute, but for detective Michael Ormewood, the investigation of this sordid crime offers a respite from his unhappy home life. His cathartic search becomes complicated when state officials join the probe. The hunt quickly fixes on John Shelley, a recently released sex convict, but Georgia agent Will Trent doubts that they have the right man. Karin Slaughter's Triptych combines plausible forensics with characters that won't let you off the hook.
From the Publisher
"Slaughter's gift for building multi-layered tension while deconstructing damaged personalities gives this thriller a nerve-wracking finish."—USA Today

"Excellent.... Karin Slaughter is not afraid to show the absolute worst in people, as well as the best."—Ft. Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel

"[Karin Slaughter] writes with a razor...Triptych elevates her to the top of my list of favorite crime writers."—Cleveland Plain Dealer

"Volcanic heroes and villians, who act both surprisingly and logically.... Slaughter has the courage to detonate her biggest bombshells early on, keeping even the wariest readers off-balance."—Kirkus Reviews

“One of 2006’s most remarkable achievements… Triptych launches a major new phase in Slaughter’s career, and it’s a delight to behold.” —Philadelphia Inquirer

Publishers Weekly
Bestseller Slaughter departs from her Grant County crime series (Faithless, etc.) with a stand-alone thriller notable mainly for a jolting mid-book twist similar to one Ira Levin used with more subtlety in A Kiss Before Dying. The case of a prostitute's brutal murder provides a welcome break for Michael Ormewood, a cynical, world-weary Atlanta cop weighed down by dealing with the city's underclass and the heartbreak of a mentally impaired son. Since the victim's tongue was severed, linking the crime to several other recent outrages, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation intervenes. Suspicions focus on a recently paroled sex offender, John Shelley, who viciously butchered a neighbor more than a decade earlier. Slaughter unexpectedly switches the narrative's perspective, but the shock value garnered by the plot twist isn't matched by the predictable denouement. (Aug.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Atlanta detective Michael Ormewood squares off against an ex-con with nothing left to lose. Let the Slaughter begin! Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Taking a break from her well-regarded series about Grant County Medical Examiner Dr. Sara Linton (Faithless, 2005, etc.), Slaughter turns to a stand-alone in which horrific physical violence grows out of the psychological kind. Nobody would care about Aleesha Monroe, the prostitute slain in an Atlanta housing project, if her killer hadn't bitten off her tongue. But because Aleesha's the fourth such victim in recent months, Det. Michael Ormewood is under intense pressure from his lieutenant to close the case-even though Michael's already got his hands full juggling a mentally challenged son and a seductive next-door neighbor. The pressure is only intensified when Will Trent, of the Georgia Bureau of Investigation's Special Criminal Apprehension Team, is assigned to the case, and when Will starts to lean on his childhood friend, Vice cop Angie Polaski, for help. Across town, saintlike John Shelley, just released from prison after serving 20 years for rape and murder, has troubles of his own: a dead-end job, a roach-infested apartment, a hard-nosed parole officer and the certainty that everyone who sees him knows he did time for killing a 15-year-old girl. When John, after rescuing a hooker from assault, walks her home and pays her colleague Robin to tell him about her first kiss, the story takes wing, and Slaughter, whose hallmark in her first five novels had been grueling forensics, shows a rare and generous capacity for compassion. Though there are mysteries along the way-how did John manage to compile a stratospheric credit rating while he was in stir, and what's the connection between the violence past and present?-Slaughter has the courage to detonate her biggest bombshells early on,keeping even the wariest readers off-balance and leaving the last act for a settling of accounts. The volcanic heroes and villains, who act both surprisingly and logically, are a welcome sign that Slaughter's trademark franchise only hints at the range of her gifts.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780440242925
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 7/31/2007
  • Series: Will Trent Series
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 512
  • Sales rank: 122,084
  • Product dimensions: 4.16 (w) x 6.89 (h) x 1.15 (d)

Meet the Author

Karin Slaughter
Karin Slaughter
Karin Slaughter is the New York Times bestselling author of eight novels, including Beyond Reach and A Faint Cold Fear, which was named an International Book of the Month Club selection; she contributed to and edited Like a Charm. She is a native of Georgia, where she currently lives and is working on her next novel, which Delacorte Press will publish in 2010.
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Read an Excerpt

Triptych


By Karin Slaughter

Random House

Karin Slaughter
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0385339461


Chapter One


February 5, 2006

Detective Michael Ormewood listened to the football game on the radio as he drove down DeKalb Avenue toward Grady Homes. The closer he got to the projects, the more tension he felt, his body almost vibrating from the strain by the time he took a right into what most cops considered a war zone. As the Atlanta Housing Authority slowly devoured itself, subsidized communities like Grady were becoming a thing of the past. The in-town real estate was too valuable, the potential for kickback too high. Right up the road was the city of Decatur, with its trendy restaurants and million-dollar houses. Less than a mile in the other direction was Georgia's gold-encrusted capitol dome. Grady was like a worse-case scenario sitting between them, a living reminder that the city too busy to hate was also too busy to take care of its own.

With the game on, the streets were fairly empty. The drug dealers and pimps were taking the night off to watch that rarest of miracles occur: the Atlanta Falcons playing in the Super Bowl. This being a Sunday night, the prostitutes were still out making a living, trying to give the churchgoers something to confess next week. Some of the girls waved at Michael as he drove past, and he returned the greeting, wondering how many unmarked cars stopped here during the middle of the night, copstelling Dispatch they were taking a ten-minute break, then motioning over one of the girls to help blow off some steam.

Building nine was in the back of the development, the crumbling red brick edifice tagged by the Ratz, one of the new gangs that had moved into the Homes. Four cruisers and another unmarked car were in front of the building, lights rolling, radios squawking. Parked in the residents' spaces were a black BMW and a pimped out Lincoln Navigator, its ten-thousand-dollar razor rims glittering gold in the streetlights. Michael fought the urge to jerk the steering wheel, take some paint off the seventy-thousand-dollar SUV. It pissed him off to see the expensive cars the bangers drove. In the last month, Michael's kid had shot up about four inches, outgrowing all his jeans, but new clothes would have to wait for Michael's next paycheck. Tim looked like he was waiting for a high tide while Daddy's tax dollars went to help these thugs pay their rent.

Instead of getting out of his car, Michael waited, listening to another few seconds of the game, enjoying a moment's peace before his world turned upside down. He had been on the force for almost fifteen years now, going straight from the army to the police, realizing too late that other than the haircut, there wasn't that much difference between the two. He knew that as soon as he got out of his car it would all start up like a clock that was wound too tight. The sleepless nights, the endless leads that never panned out, the bosses breathing down his neck. The press would probably catch on to it, too. Then he'd have cameras stuck in his face every time he left the squad, people asking him why the case wasn't solved, his son seeing it on the news and asking Daddy why people were so mad at him.

Collier, a young beat cop with biceps so thick with muscle he couldn't put his arms down flat against his sides, tapped on the glass, gesturing for Michael to roll down his window. Collier had made a circling motion with his meaty hand, even though the kid had probably never been in a car with crank windows.

Michael pressed the button on the console, saying, "Yeah?" as the glass slid down.

"Who's winning?"

"Not Atlanta," Michael told him, and Collier nodded as if he had expected the news. Atlanta's previous trip to the Super Bowl was several years back. Denver had thumped them 34-19.

Collier asked, "How's Ken?"

"He's Ken," Michael answered, not offering an elaboration on his partner's health.

"Could use him on this." The patrolman jerked his head toward the building. "It's pretty nasty."

Michael kept his own counsel. The kid was in his early twenties, probably living in his mother's basement, thinking he was a man because he strapped on a gun every day. Michael had met several Colliers in the Iraqi desert when the first Bush had decided to go in. They were all eager pups with that glint in their eye that told you they had joined up for more than three squares and a free education. They were obsessed with duty and honor, all that shit they'd seen on TV and been fed by the recruiters who plucked them out of high school like ripe cherries. They had been promised technical training and home-side base assignments, anything that would get them to sign on the dotted line. Most of them ended up being shipped off on the first transport plane to the desert, where they got shot before they could put their helmets on.

Ted Greer came out of the building, tugging at his tie like he needed air. The lieutenant was pasty for a black man, spending most of his time behind his desk basking in the fluorescent lights as he waited for his retirement to kick in.

He saw Michael still sitting in the car and scowled. "You working tonight or just out for a drive?"

Michael took his time getting out, sliding the key out of the ignition just as the halftime commentary started on the radio. The evening was warm for February, and the air-conditioning units people had stuck in their windows buzzed like bees around a hive.

Greer barked at Collier, "You got something to do?"

Collier had the sense to leave, tucking his chin to his chest like he'd been popped on the nose.

"Fucking mess," Greer told Michael. He took out his handkerchief and wiped the sweat off his forehead. "Some kind of sick perv got ahold of her."

Michael had heard as much when he'd gotten the call that pulled him off his living-room couch. "Where is she?"

"Six flights up." Greer folded the handkerchief into a neat square and tucked it into his pocket. "We traced the nine-one-one call to that phone." He pointed across the street.

Michael stared at the phone booth, a relic of the past. Everybody had cell phones now, especially dealers and bangers.

"Woman's voice," Greer told him. "We'll have the tape sometime tomorrow."

"How long did it take to get somebody out here?"

"Thirty-two minutes," Greer told him, and Michael's only surprise was that it hadn't taken longer. According to a local news team investigation, response times to emergency calls from Grady averaged around forty-five minutes. An ambulance took even longer.

Greer turned back to the building as if it could absolve him. "We're gonna have to call in some help on this one."

Michael bristled at the suggestion. Statistically, Atlanta was one of the most violent cities in America. A dead hooker was hardly an earth-shattering development, especially considering where she was found.

He told Greer, "That's all I need is more assholes telling me how to do my job."

"This asshole thinks it's exactly what you need," the lieutenant countered. Michael knew better than to argue--not because Greer wouldn't tolerate insubordination, but because he'd agree with Michael just to shut him up, then turn around and do whatever the hell he wanted to anyway.

Greer added, "This one's bad."

"They're all bad," Michael reminded him, opening the back door to his car and taking out his suit jacket.

"Girl didn't have a chance," Greer continued. "Beat, cut, fucked six ways to Sunday. We got a real sick fuck on our hands."

Michael put on his jacket, thinking Greer sounded like he was auditioning for HBO. "Ken's out of the hospital. Said come by and see him anytime."

Greer made some noises about being real busy lately before trotting off toward his car, looking back over his shoulder as if he was afraid Michael would follow. Michael waited until his boss was in his car and pulling out of the lot before he headed toward the building.

Collier stood at the doorway, hand resting on the butt of his gun. He probably thought he was keeping watch, but Michael knew that the person who had committed this crime wasn't going to come back for more. He was finished with the woman. There was nothing else he wanted to do.

Collier said, "The boss left fast."

"Thanks for the news flash."

Michael braced himself as he opened the door, letting the damp, dark building slowly draw him in. Whoever had designed the Homes hadn't been thinking about happy kids coming home from school to warm cookies and milk. They had focused on security, keeping open spaces to a minimum and covering all the light fixtures in steel mesh to protect the bulbs. The walls were exposed concrete with narrow windows tucked into tight little corners, the safety wire embedded in the glass looking like uniform cobwebs. Spray paint covered surfaces that had been painted white once upon a time. Gang tags, warnings and various pieces of information covered them now. To the right of the front door, someone had scrawled, Kim is a ho! Kim is a ho! Kim is a ho!

Michael was looking up the winding staircase, counting the six flights, when a door creaked open. He turned to find an ancient black woman staring at him, her coal dark eyes peering out around the edge of the steel door.

"Police," he said, holding up his badge. "Don't be afraid."

The door opened wider. She was wearing a floral apron over a stained white T-shirt and jeans. "I ain't afraid'a you, bitch."

Clustered behind her were four old women, all but one of them African-American. Michael knew they weren't here to help. Grady, like any small community, thrived on gossip and these were the mouths that fed the supply line.

Still, he had to ask, "Any of y'all see anything?"

They shook their heads in unison, bobbleheads on the Grady dashboard.

"That's great," Michael said, tucking his badge back into his pocket as he headed toward the stairs. "Thanks for helping keep your community safe."

She snapped, "That's your job, cocksucker."

He stopped, his foot still on the bottom stair as he turned back toward her, looking her straight in the eye. She returned the glare, rheumy eyes shifting back and forth like she was reading the book of his life. The woman was younger than the others, probably in her early seventies, but somehow grayer and smaller than her companions. Spidery lines crinkled the skin around her lips, wrinkles etched from years of sucking on cigarettes. A shock of gray streaked through the hair on the top of her head as well as the ones corkscrewing out of her chin like dreadlocks. She wore the most startling shade of orange lipstick he had ever seen on a woman.

He asked, "What's your name?"

Her chin tilted up in defiance, but she told him, "Nora."

"Somebody made a nine-one-one call from that phone booth outside."

"I hope they wash they hands after."

Michael allowed a smile. "Did you know her?"

"We all knowed her." Her tone indicated there was a lot more to be told but she wasn't the one who was going to tell it to some dumb-ass white cop. Obviously, Nora didn't exactly have a college degree under her belt, but Michael had never set much store by that kind of thing. He could tell from her eyes that the woman was sharp. She obviously had street smarts. You didn't live to be that old in a place like Grady by being stupid.

Michael took his foot off the step, walking back toward the cluster of women. "She working?"

Nora kept her eye on him, still wary. "Most nights."

The white woman behind her provided, "She an honest girl."

Nora tsked her tongue. "Such a young little thing." There was a hint of challenge in her voice when she said, "No kind of life for her, but what else could she do?"

Michael nodded like he understood. "Did she have any regulars?"

They all shook their heads, and Nora provided, "She never brought her work home with her."

Michael waited, wondering if they would add anything else. He counted the seconds off in his head, thinking he'd let it go to twenty. A helicopter flew over the building and car wheels squealed against asphalt a couple of streets over, but no one paid attention. This was the sort of neighborhood where people got nervous if they didn't hear gunshots at least a couple of times a week. There was a natural order to their lives, and violence--or the threat of it--was as much a part of it as fast food and cheap liquor.

"All right," Michael said, having counted the seconds to twenty-five. He took out one of his business cards, handing it to Nora as he told her, "Something to wipe your ass on."

She grunted in disgust, holding the card between her thumb and forefinger. "My ass is bigger than that."

He gave her a suggestive wink, made his voice a growl. "Don't think I hadn't noticed, darlin'."

She barked a laugh as she slammed the door in his face. She had kept the card, though. He had to take that as a positive sign.

Michael walked back to the stairs, taking the first flight two at a time. All of the buildings at Grady had elevators, but even the ones that worked were dangerous. As a first-year patrolman, Michael had been called out to the Homes on a domestic disturbance and gotten caught in one of the creaky contraptions with a busted radio. He had spent about two hours trying not to add to the overwhelming smell of piss and vomit before his sergeant realized he hadn't reported in and sent somebody to look for him. The old-timers had laughed at his stupidity for another half hour before helping get him out.

Welcome to the brotherhood.

As Michael started on the second flight of stairs, he felt a change in the air.

Continues...


Excerpted from Triptych by Karin Slaughter Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 119 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(66)

4 Star

(30)

3 Star

(16)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(2)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 119 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 1, 2011

    A great mystery with a lot of twists.

    This is the second Karin Slaughter book I've read, and I loved it. I usually read James Patterson, but I like this just as much. The characters are real. You feel their grief. Don't want to spoil anything at all. When things come together, it's neat.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    INTENSE!!

    The way Slaughter jumps from character to character giving you their different perspectives each time is genius!! You are left with your jaw on the floor when the pieces are put together. Outstanding!! Will be adding this series to my collection for sure!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2007

    Brutal murders in Atlanta

    Mutilated female bodies are turning up all over Atlanta. Atlanta is known for its history of rape and crime but some ¿sicko¿ is creating havoc that is sending the Atlanta Police and the Georgia Bureau of Investigation in circles as they attempt to solve the puzzles this maniac leaves and still stay sane with their normally uncooperative inter-department methods. Grady Homes is a section of Atlanta that is deeply infested with slums and contains much of the areas crime. Prostitutes are everywhere, some giving freebies to the police so they can maintain their business. On the sixth floor of one of the buildings in Grady lies a young woman dead, cut up badly, raped, her tongue ripped off, and her body discarded on the stairs for all to view. The police arrived, conducted their investigation, making their nasty comments about the body and the buildings, and the girls that are being killed doing their prostitution. Detective Michael Ormewood arrived after the original police who had found the body. Michael was one of the cops that liked to partake of the free women in the area. GBI Detective Will Trent, a completely different type of cop, worked with Michael on the investigation. Back in 1985 Mary Alice Finney had been found in the same condition as the girls in the Grady Homes section had been found in present time mutilated, raped, and cut in many areas of their bodies. The same two detectives had worked that case. John Shelley had been arrested for that murder and was convicted and sent to prison. He had a terrible time in prison being a young man that the other guys loved to force themselves on. They made Shelley¿s insides look like hamburger through their constant raping of him. Prison was not kind to Shelley who insisted he was not guilty of killing Mary Alice Finney. In 2005 Shelley was released and found a world changed so much that he did not know how he could ever fit. Work for ex-cons was laborious, sparse, and paid little, which is why he ended up in a car wash doing such menial work. Located in a poor area loaded with prostitutes and working with some fellow workers, some ex-cons too, that would not let him forget his past, Shelley plodded on and got nixed up with Angie, one of the prostitutes who actually was an undercover cop. He did not know that fact so John worked her to get information in his search for someone connected with the killing he was accused of years ago. Karin Slaughter takes the reader on a trip through prison, recuperation from prison (if there is such a thing), and the rough life led by many in such desolate areas of crime in Atlanta. The story contains love, both true and untrue, and you get the feelings with the words used that you are in the middle of this story trying to figure out who is the mutilator, the killer, the good guys or the bad guys. Granted, Slaughter does not give anything away as you read until you get very deep in the book. A very enjoyable brutal mystery-murder story. I highly recommend it.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 15, 2010

    Must read book. If you love twisted thrillers.

    I 'ABSOLUTELY' could not put this book down. It is a MUST read. If you enjoy twisted thrillers. Made me want to read ALL Karen Slaughters others books. Which I have. This one is my favorite. I cannot wait for her next book. She writes so you cannot put the book down from the first page to the last.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2008

    Slow reading

    I usually read a book in 2 or 3 days, but so far I have been reading on this for 4 nights and am only 1/2 way through. For some reason I just can't get into this book like I have her other books. I don't know if it is because she skips around so much from past to present or from charater to character or what. To me, this isn't one of her best. I should have saved my money on this one.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2012

    Awesome book---loved it.

    Excellent. Rarely do I read a suspense story that surprises me. TripTych did. It would be worth reading twice!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 30, 2011

    Highly recommend this book!

    A great book that grabs you from page one and holds onto to you until the last page! The characters are real and powerful and the story line is terrifyingly real. A must read for anyone who loves a good mystery!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2010

    triptych

    just an all around great read

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 29, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    This is a good book

    This book was a great read,good storyline,good characters and it keeps you engrossed till the end.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 8, 2008

    So.....

    Must be me, but I did not think this book was all that, it was good, just not all that good....

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 25, 2008

    Slow Reading

    I just haven't been able to get into this book like I have the others. Usually it only takes me about 3 days to read a book but for some reason I just can't get into this one. Hopefully the ending is worth the wait. I love all of her other books, but this one is not as interesting.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2007

    Triptych

    The book started out slow, but overall it was really good. I loved how she switched stories everytime you thought you were getting close to solving the murders another problem arose and another conflict became involved. I loved the twists and turns and how three different stories had so much in common but yet they were so different, but in the end, it was all tied together, no loose ends. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys reading murder stories.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2007

    Masterpiece!

    Triptych is a fascinating, intense book. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. The beginning of the book started like an ordinary novel, then clips of newspapers from the past link to the present. The way things connected amazed me, it was pure genious! I absolutely loved this book!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2007

    A riveting thriller you'll find hard to put down.

    I LOVED this book. Karen Slaughter has ventured out into a new realm of writing that's more than exciting. I really had a hard time putting this book down to do other things. Her style in this book is riveting, compelling the reader not to stop because of the suspense and the desire to see what¿s going to happen next. The title was so appropriate in that her story line really was a ¿Triptych¿ with the multi-facets of her characters , each one being laid out in the story like a piece of artwork, very pleasing to look at in your minds eye. The only part that left me feeling suspended and wanting more was the ending. The reader was left to finish the conclusion mentally, but the way she ended each scene with each character there was only one logical conclusion. I would have liked for her to embellish just a little more to make each scene a little more complete. All in all, the book is a strong 5 points. You won¿t regret reading or buying the book to re-read it again. It's a keeper!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2007

    Very gritty

    I am on page 70 so far and the story has been very gritty and at times graphic. I enjoy Karin Slaughter's in-your-face approach to storytelling. I can't wait to finish and find out what happens!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2007

    Highly Recommended!

    I highly recommend this book. It is great! Big twist to the whole story. I loved it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 28, 2014

    This is not the first audiobook I¿ve listened to, but it is the

    This is not the first audiobook I’ve listened to, but it is the first one I finished in less than three days; a little less than fifteen hours of listening time. Now, audiobooks aren’t really my thing, because I get distracted too easily and my mind starts wandering. But, with Triptych this was not the case. I’m not sure if it was the excellent narrator (Michael Kramer), or the gripping story, but either way I listened to this book every opportunity I could.

    Another bookworm friend of mine has been raving about Triptych endlessly, so the moment I got the audio version of this book I jumped right into it. I now see why she loves Karin Slaughter’s books so much. Triptych was downright awesome! If you’re a fan of Karen Rose’s books, you’ll understand what I’m talking about. This lady (Slaughter) writes characters that are flawed, raw, and brutally honest. What didn’t escape my noticed is that all the characters were both good and bad. How much more real than that do you want? We all have a good side and a darker side (whether we’d admit it or not), and Slaughter capitalizes on this by playing on the reader’s emotions as to whether you should be sympathizing with the villain, or should you be despising him? Or, is it rather a question of hating the act, not the person? Also, early on she gives you the culprit who committed the heinous murders and other atrocities, but it’s up to you whether you’re going to see it, or whether you choose to be kept in the dark until the big reveal at the end. Whichever way, you might feel like kicking yourself for not seeing early on what the author is hiding in plain sight.

    Other than a great narrator, I loved the characters in this book, and the plot with all its twists and reveals. Big or small, each character comes to life to tell a story of how people are not what they seem, and how easily we can be deceived and let down by the ones we trust the most. I loved the bits of humor Slaughter added to this story, but mostly it was the nerve-wracking suspense and the intricate aspects that mold each character’s personality, that made this into a riveting read. It’s as though Slaughter knew exactly what I’m looking for in a book and while writing Triptych she was probably thinking: “Angie, I’m writing this book just for your reading pleasure”. Well, thanks Karin. You did a splendid job. You even left out the romance. Oh yeah!

    Due to frequent use of profanity and scenes of explicit violence which gives this book a realistic edge, I wouldn’t recommend Triptych to readers below the age of eighteen. For everyone else – get it. Now!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2013

    Great Read

    This is the first book in the Will Trent Series. I read it because I was looking for a read a like book by another author and this author's name came up. It was so good that after I finished it, I bought all the other books in the Will Trent Series and just finished reading them. This is a great murder/mystery and will keep you on the edge of your seat. Really enjoyed the book.

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  • Posted June 7, 2013

    Ok

    Not bad. Hate Angie. Why doesn't Slaughter kill her off. Trent is a nice enough guy. Hard to believe he can get by with his dyslexia as bad as he is. I enjoyed it. Waiting for Sara to get a life

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2013

    Good read!!

    I enjoyed this book, would recommend it.

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