Tristessa

Tristessa

4.6 7
by Jack Kerouac
     
 

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"Each book by Jack Kerouac is unique, a telepathic diamond. With prose set in the middle of his mind, he reveals consciousness itself in all its syntatic elaboration, detailing the luminous emptiness of his own paranoiac confusion. Such rich natural writing is nonpareil in later half XX century, a synthesis of Proust, Céline, Thomas Wolfe, Hemingway, Genet,

Overview

"Each book by Jack Kerouac is unique, a telepathic diamond. With prose set in the middle of his mind, he reveals consciousness itself in all its syntatic elaboration, detailing the luminous emptiness of his own paranoiac confusion. Such rich natural writing is nonpareil in later half XX century, a synthesis of Proust, Céline, Thomas Wolfe, Hemingway, Genet, Thelonius Monk, Basho, Charlie Parker, and Kerouac's own athletic sacred insight.

"This entire short novel Tristessa's a narrative meditation studying a hen, a rooster, a dove, a cat, a chihuaha dog, family meat, and a ravishing, ravished junky lady, first in their crowded bedroom, then out to drunken streets, taco stands, & pads at dawn in Mexico City slums." —Allen Ginsberg

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780140168112
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/28/1992
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
96
Sales rank:
1,125,899
Product dimensions:
7.56(w) x 5.06(h) x 0.26(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Jack Kerouac(1922-1969), the central figure of the Beat Generation, was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1922 and died in St. Petersburg, Florida, in 1969. Among his many novels are On the Road, The Dharma Bums, Big Sur, and Visions of Cody.

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Tristessa 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book four years ago, and over time it has become one of my favorites. I¿m amazed that On the Road is so celebrated. I think this book is the one where Kerouac begins to see that the bohemian lifestyle has it¿s downside too. Tristessa is incredible in that it shows the story of a truly wasted life. Tristessa is smart, beautiful, and full of love. Yet her surroundings and the circumstances of her impoverished conspire to destroy her. Jack catches her right at that moment when she can turn it all around or sink forever into the abyss. She still has a chance. The significance of that fact is what the story is about. She has a chance, but it s most likely her last chance for salvation.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Like Burrough's 'Naked Lunch' many might think this book may ramble. But that's not really the case. Form follows function in this romantic tale of a Mexican prostitute and the main character's attempts to woo her. Autiobiographical, as is the case with most of Kerouac's books, 'Tristessa' is much more enjoyable than 'On the Road' or even his 'Desolation Angels.' Truly a remarkable look at life and writing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
it is absolutely unbelievable that a person can write a book like kerouac does, and people can read it, and understand it completely. written in a stream-of-conciousness manner, with little 'long length description,' Tristessa is a deeply poetic work - of compassion, love, lust, greed, and selflessness - an amazing description of the ravages of drug use in a down-and-out kinda town. Kerouac's book THE DARMA BUMS is the story that takes place between the first and second halves of Tristessa. Kerouac's enigmatic way of intertwining his literary works has impressed readers for nearly fifty years
Guest More than 1 year ago
"Tristessa" is a heart wrenching and beautifully written account of a point in Jack Kerouac's life when Buddhism was just starting to become an influence in the authors illustrious life. The compassion shown by the main character in this book conflicted by the cruel addiction endured by the Mexican prostitute he endears, along with the setting of the fellaheen slums of Mexico circa 1950 form a lugubrious love story told subjectively by Kerouac. This book is full of conflict, from the main character's own conflicts between longing and faith, the conflict between static and dynamic characters, to the schism between Buddhism and Christianity. The conflict in this short novel is the driving force behind the writter. Kerouac's use of symbolism and his renowned poetic prose enthrall the reader and make this book very hard to put down.