Triumph of Hope: From Theresienstadt and Auschwitz to Israel [NOOK Book]

Overview

Now available for the first time in English, this is the memoir of a Jewish woman who was taken to Auschwitz while several months pregnant. Ruth Elias, a young Jewish woman from Czechoslovakia, survived three years in the Nazi camps of Theresienstadt and Auschwitz. In this haunting testimony, she relives the day-to-day conditions and horrific inhumane treatment of those years. She describes in painful detail how, having given birth in Auschwitz, she and her baby became part of a sadistic experiment personally ...
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Triumph of Hope: From Theresienstadt and Auschwitz to Israel

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Overview

Now available for the first time in English, this is the memoir of a Jewish woman who was taken to Auschwitz while several months pregnant. Ruth Elias, a young Jewish woman from Czechoslovakia, survived three years in the Nazi camps of Theresienstadt and Auschwitz. In this haunting testimony, she relives the day-to-day conditions and horrific inhumane treatment of those years. She describes in painful detail how, having given birth in Auschwitz, she and her baby became part of a sadistic experiment personally conducted by the infamous SS physician Dr. Josef Mengele. Triumph of Hope also vividly recounts the aftermath of imprisonment, the difficult adjustment to normal life after the war. Ruth Elias's story is a portrayal of the emotional and psychological state of life in chaotic postwar Europe: from the desperate, futile attempts to track down family and friends; to the unabated hostility of former neighbors; to the chilling indifference of those who knew nothing of the experience of the camps. For Ruth, hope would have to take the difficult path to a new life in a new land: Israel, where new challenges, new obstacles awaited.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The understated tone of this memoir adds to the author's powerful re-creation of her life as a young Czechoslovak Jewish woman during the Holocaust. After the 1939 German occupation of her country, Elias, with her father and sister (her parents were divorced), lived undercover in a Czech village until 1942, when they were betrayed and removed to the Theresienstadt ghetto. To avoid deportation to a concentration camp, Elias married her boyfriend, Koni, a member of the Jewish ghetto police. But the two were eventually sent to Auschwitz, where she tried to hide her pregnancy. Horrifyingly, the author describes how camp doctor Joseph Mengele allowed her to give birth, then conducted an experiment to determine how long it would take her newborn son to starve to death. Another prisoner helped Elias inject the baby with morphine on the sixth day. Also detailed is Elias's harsh struggle to survive until the end of the war. She subsequently separated from Koni, remarried and emigrated to Israel. Photos. (May)
Kirkus Reviews
Ably translated, this is an extraordinary Holocaust memoir wherein a young Czech woman undergoes a dizzying variety of hellish experiences. Published in association with the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, this volume is a clinic on the varieties of torture that one could undergo as a Jew during the Nazi period. Young Ruth was steeled for loss early in life as a child of divorced parents. This girl who enjoyed music and skiing soon found herself in a long line of Jews delivering all valuables (especially money, jewelry, musical instruments, and radios) to the new Gestapo authorities. The family managed to hide out on a farm with gentiles for many months, but their resources ran out and the Gestapo closed in, forcing the family to the camp Theresienstadt, where conditions were occasionally livable thanks to periodic visits by the Red Cross. But inmates suffered all the more when their meager calorie allotment dropped back to starvation level. To her credit, young Ruth volunteered as a nurse, even though her duties required more removal of corpses than relieving anyone's suffering. While bedridden herself with fever, she married her ghetto policeman boyfriend. Elias, soon pregnant, was then transferred to Auschwitz, where pregnancy was a certain death sentence. Her attending physician turned out to be none other than the notorious Dr. Josef Mengele, who spared her life because he wanted to see how long an unfed baby could live. The most pathetic lines in this moving memoir are a soliloquy by this young mother who must kill her newborn for a chance of survival: "My child you can't even whimper anymore." Elias is ultimately tapped for forced labor, allowing her to survive to see the ThirdReich crumble and eventually begin a family in Palestine. Because of the variety of the authorĂ¾s experiences and the power of their expression here, if you could only read one Holocaust memoirĂ¾this should be the one. (b&w photos, not seen)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780471673095
  • Publisher: Turner Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 9/1/1999
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 286
  • Sales rank: 189,156
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

RUTH ELIAS lives in Beth Yitzchak, Israel.
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Table of Contents

Growing Up in Ostrava.

Going into Hiding in Pozorice.

In the Theresienstadt Ghetto.

Auschwitz.

In the Labor Camp.

Liberation and Return.

My Israel.

Epilogue.

Acknowledgments.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2002

    A Brilliant True Account of A Survivor of the Holocaust

    This is an explicit account of what life was like in the ghettos and concentration camps. I could not put this book down when I started reading it. At times it was hard for me to read without crying, especially the part when Ruth had given birth to a child and the cruel actions of Dr. Mengele, also known as Dr. Death. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to read about the Holocaust. Unfortunately, a lot of books like this are sadly out of print but you can still obtain them, it is definitely worth it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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