Triumph

Triumph

4.5 2
by Philip Wylie
     
 

In the world’s upper hemisphere, only one small group has survived World War III: fourteen people, sheltered deep within a limestone mountain in Connecticut and with enough supplies and equipment to maintain their subsistence for upwards of two years. The group includes a forward-thinking millionaire and his family, a levelheaded Jewish scientist, a playboy,…  See more details below

Overview

In the world’s upper hemisphere, only one small group has survived World War III: fourteen people, sheltered deep within a limestone mountain in Connecticut and with enough supplies and equipment to maintain their subsistence for upwards of two years. The group includes a forward-thinking millionaire and his family, a levelheaded Jewish scientist, a playboy, an aging African American servant and his daughter, a gigolo and the glamorous woman who has been his mistress, a beautiful Chinese girl, a young meter reader, two children, and a Japanese engineer. Fully aware of the outcome of the war that had raged briefly above them, the survivors seethe with hatred, fall into depression over their losses, rise to moments of superhuman bravery, and lapse into behavior that reflects their human weaknesses. Philip Wylie mercilessly predicts the inevitable end of a world that continues to function as selfishly and as barbarously as our own.

Editorial Reviews

Eugene Burdick

Triumph is a powerful novel about love, drunkenness, the racial problem—above all, a hair-raising story of worldwide nuclear warfare. The pages describing what an atomic war will look like are unique; there is nothing like them in literature. What happens to the handful of people that survive World War III is fascinating in a nightmarish way. I know of no other book quite like Triumph.”

—Eugene Burdick, coauthor of Fail-Safe

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803260139
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press
Publication date:
12/01/2007
Series:
Beyond Armageddon Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author

The earliest books by Philip Wylie (1902–71) greatly influenced twentieth-century science fiction pulp magazines and comic books: The Savage Gentleman was the inspiration for Doc Savage, Gladiator for Superman, and When Worlds Collide for Flash Gordon. A prolific writer of fiction and nonfiction, Wylie left a legacy of hundreds of short stories, articles, serials, syndicated newspaper columns, novels, and works of social criticism.

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Triumph 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I could not put this book down. The idea that the USSR would destroy the entire world including the USSR in order to rule the entire Southern hemisphere is chilling! The characters are well developed, the plot is riveting and realistic, the detail is graphic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
¿Triumph¿ is the latest addition to Bison¿s series entitled ¿Beyond Armageddon.¿ Devoted to reprinting science fiction and fantasy that deals with life after whatever ¿final battle¿ the authors choose, this series has returned a good deal of seminal work to print. It is an important and exciting part of modern publishing. Philip Wylie (1902-1971) is perhaps best remembered today for his ¿When Worlds Collide¿ (co-written with Edwin Balmer), also a part of the Bison series. Over the years, his somewhat erudite writing inspired a substantial portion of American popular culture. His ¿The Savage Gentleman¿ is generally considered the seed for Doc Savage, just as his ¿Gladiator¿ supposedly formed the idea behind Superman. Some writers have gone so far as to claim that Flash Gordon evolved from ¿When Worlds Collide.¿ ¿Triumph,¿ originally published in 1963, concerns World War III and its aftermath. At the time of its publication, atomic war was considered almost inevitable¿and somewhat immediate. Wylie¿s description of that war in ¿Triumph¿ remains horrifying and sobering. As does the core of the book, which has to do with how human nature adapts to its circumstances while remaining essentially the same. It is unfortunate, Wylie emphasizes, that the destructive side of human nature will remain intact. Wylie¿s mix of characters is somewhat forced, almost like a menu of a modern ¿politically correct¿ cast list. The 14 survivors of the war ¿ holed up inside a Connecticut mountain ¿ include representatives of several races and all the economic classes. But Wylie¿s fine-tuned sense of knowing exactly what he wants to say rescues the novel from its own clichés. Bison¿s series also contains Wylie¿s ¿The Disappearance¿ and ¿Gladiator.¿