Troll Valley: The Fairy Tale Your Grandparents Never Told You

Troll Valley: The Fairy Tale Your Grandparents Never Told You

5.0 4
by Lars Walker
     
 

Chris Anderson has everything. He’s the son of the richest family in town. He lives in a beautiful, loving home. He even has a fairy godmother.

Chris Anderson also has nothing. He was born with a deformed arm, and when he gets angry he sees visions that terrify him.

At the turn of the Twentieth Century, in a nation wrestling with faith and…  See more details below

Overview

Chris Anderson has everything. He’s the son of the richest family in town. He lives in a beautiful, loving home. He even has a fairy godmother.

Chris Anderson also has nothing. He was born with a deformed arm, and when he gets angry he sees visions that terrify him.

At the turn of the Twentieth Century, in a nation wrestling with faith and science, tradition and change, Chris will be forced to confront his own nature, and learn the meanings of freedom, love, and the grace of God.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781105370175
Publisher:
Lulu.com
Publication date:
01/31/2012
Sold by:
LULU PRESS
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
730 KB

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Troll Valley: The Fairy Tale Your Grandparents Never Told You 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I just fished this book and it the first of Lars Walker's novels I have read. I am planning to read more. It is about a man who is a devout Christian with many human frailties and the book explores in a very realistic way how the choices he makes affect his soul, and yet it is also a fantasy novel. Walker blends these elements very well. He points out errors Christians can fall into by showing his characters committing these errors. He left me with much food for thought, even though I am LDS and probably not his specific target audience.
JI_Oscarsen More than 1 year ago
This is a great read. If you have any taste for George MacDonald, I think you'll like this. If you are put off by other reviews that emphasize its quality as a Christian morality tale, don't be. It's not a moralistic message parading as a story. It's edifying, true, but only because it's a well-told story. Besides, there is nothing trite or moralistic in the treatment of the human heart.
tanglewoodDM More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book, I am looking forward to the next one!
Raindream More than 1 year ago
I loved this novel. I've read Walker's other books and like this one the best. His characters have authentic voices and raise questions that are not clearly answered, which makes this fantastic story all the more real. It's a graceful coming of age story, following Christian Anderson, who is a sad boy with a deformed arm. He lives with a bright, inventive, but overly cautious father, a strong and increasingly domineering mother, a hard but loving grandfather, two siblings, and a fairy godmother. But there's no bibbity-bobbity-boo here. Christian slips into the underworld or faerie land a few times. You might even say the whole story is about how faerie land is breaking in on Chris' life. One time, he sees a giant hammering away on the manacles tying him to the ground. He's crying because he can't get free, but when Chris asks him about it, he says he chained himself down so that he wouldn't attack the beautiful children who were playing nearby. Now in his chains, he wrestles to get free and attack them. That complex conflict of the heart and will may be the key to Troll Valley. Christian and other characters are limited in ways that keep them healthy to a degree and restrained. They don't know how to assert their desires in positive ways and chafe at their restrictions until they can no longer stand it. If and when they break free, they make a terrible mess of themselves. Can they handle the self-determination they seek? Some of the restrictions which bind them are not sound ones, which makes the binding worse, and that is one of the major themes that makes this novel wonderful. The perpetual lie of the devil is that we should control ourselves. "God controls himself; why shouldn't we?" asks the enemy of our souls. All of us long to have some kind of control of our lives. Most of us believe we have it, not noticing how we define ourselves in response to our families and societies. The devil knows we can't be truly independent of anyone or thing, but we want to believe we can. For us to die trying, of course, is his goal. He knows we can't handle it. God calls us to get our eyes off of ourselves and look to him, who is the springhead of life. He wants us dependent on him, and why not? He is the Good, the Life, the Truth, the Love. We know what is good in this world because of his character and revelation. If we try to control our lives through scientific rules or anger or rebellion or if we escape into alcohol or other amusements, we miss life and the joy the Lord calls us to. That's what I got out of Troll Valley. I recommend it.