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The Troll With No Heart in His Body
     

The Troll With No Heart in His Body

5.0 1
by Lise Lunge-Larsen
 

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As tall as trees and as ancient and rugged as the Norwegian landscape from which they come, trolls are some of lore's most fascinating and varied creatures. Some live under bridges, others deep inside caves. They can carry their heads under their arms or hide their hearts inside wells. They can walk across oceans and fly over mountains. Trees and shrubs may grow from

Overview

As tall as trees and as ancient and rugged as the Norwegian landscape from which they come, trolls are some of lore's most fascinating and varied creatures. Some live under bridges, others deep inside caves. They can carry their heads under their arms or hide their hearts inside wells. They can walk across oceans and fly over mountains. Trees and shrubs may grow from their heads, and their noses can be long enough to stir soup. There are troll hags, troll daughters, and elderly, shrunken trolls. Old or young, they are quarrelsome, ugly, and boastful, and they love to trick princesses and children. To defeat them, children must rely on the strengths of their humanity-persistence, kindness, pluck, and willingness to heed good advice

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
"Norwegian-born storyteller Lunge-Larsen scoured her homeland's literary landscape for this stellar collection of nine troll tales, many of which will be unfamiliar to American children," wrote PW in a starred review. "An admirable subject matter, spun with enthusiasm." Ages 5-12. (Aug.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Not surprisingly, trolls come off second best in all but one of these nine stories. ``The Boy Who Became A Lion, a Falcon, and an Ant'' turns three monsters into rubble; ``The Boy and the North Wind'' give a thieving troll-hag a proper comeuppance; in the title story a young prince finds a troll's heart in an unlikely place; and everyone knows what happens to the menacing bridge-dweller in ``The Three Billy Goats Gruff.'' In the one exception, ``The Handshake,'' three trolls greet a stray horse's owner with a prank, but part on friendly terms with man and animal. Bowen draws inspiration from Norwegian folk art for her polychrome woodcuts, emphasizing silhouettes and giving her long-nosed trolls a properly dimwitted, disheveled look. Lunge-Larsen notes both her printed sources and any changes she's made, adding an essay on the stories' significance for young listeners. It's an appealing collection: varied but not too long, spiced with danger, heroism, humorous moments, and violence that's toned (not watered) down.
Library Journal
Gr 2-5-Nine Norwegian tales that feature ugly, dim-witted giants who live inside mountains or under bridges, as in "The Three Billy Goats Gruff," the best known of these tales. In fact, the majority of the stories here will be unfamiliar to American audiences. Trolls readily capture children to eat for dinner ("Butterball"), steal princesses and hold them captive to rub their aching heads ("The Boy Who Became a Lion, a Falcon, and an Ant"), and covet human possessions ("The Handshake" and "The Boy and the North Wind"). Lunge-Larsen has fashioned her retellings largely from the folktales collected by Peter Christian Asbjirnsen and Jirgen Moe in the early 1800s. She includes detailed source notes for each selection, a bibliography, and an insightful introduction that discusses her experience with trolls. The retellings retain the power of the originals and don't shy away from the violent nature of several of these stories. Each tale is accompanied by a full-page illustration, several smaller images, and decorative borders that underscore the plot. Bowen's colorful woodcuts-with their folk-art sensibilities-evoke traditional Norwegian decorative art and architecture. The interplay between the art and the text is outstanding. Because of its readability, tellability, and strong visual presentation, this collection should have wide and enduring appeal.-Denise Anton Wright, Alliance Library System, Bloomington, IL Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Not surprisingly, trolls come off second best in all but one of these nine stories. "The Boy Who Became A Lion, a Falcon, and an Ant" turns three monsters into rubble; "The Boy and the North Wind" give a thieving troll-hag a proper comeuppance; in the title story a young prince finds a troll's heart in an unlikely place; and everyone knows what happens to the menacing bridge-dweller in "The Three Billy Goats Gruff." In the one exception, "The Handshake," three trolls greet a stray horse's owner with a prank, but part on friendly terms with man and animal. Bowen draws inspiration from Norwegian folk art for her polychrome woodcuts, emphasizing silhouettes and giving her long-nosed trolls a properly dimwitted, disheveled look. Lunge-Larsen notes both her printed sources and any changes she's made, adding an essay on the stories' significance for young listeners. It's an appealing collection: varied but not too long, spiced with danger, heroism, humorous moments, and violence that's toned—not watered—down. (bibliography) (Folklore. 10-13)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547562308
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
09/27/1999
Sold by:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
96
File size:
42 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
10 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Lise Lunge-Larsen is an award-winning author and a professional storyteller. Born and raised in Norway, she lives with her family in the hills of Duluth, Minnesota.
Betsy Bowen is the author-illustrator of several books for children. Reviewers have described her distinctive woodcuts as bold, rich and handsome. The mother of three sons, she has lived with her family on the rugged north shore of Lake Superior in Minnesota for more than thirty years.

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Troll With no Heart in His Body 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago