Trouble Is a Lonesome Town

Trouble Is a Lonesome Town

by Lee Hazlewood
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Trouble Is a Lonesome Town was Lee Hazlewood's first proper solo album, following his prosperous late-'50s partnership with Duane Eddy and prior to his mentoring and making of '60s boot-walker Nancy Sinatra. Hazlewood considered it a "writer's album" from which other artists could cull songs, butSee more details below

Overview

Trouble Is a Lonesome Town was Lee Hazlewood's first proper solo album, following his prosperous late-'50s partnership with Duane Eddy and prior to his mentoring and making of '60s boot-walker Nancy Sinatra. Hazlewood considered it a "writer's album" from which other artists could cull songs, but Trouble is a perfectly legitimate effort in its own right and characteristically wonderful Hazlewood. The songs are succinct, country-drenched cowboy ballads given a certain undeniable authority by Hazlewood's warm, bottomless baritone, which booms out of the music like a voice amplified from the heavens. The album runs through jail songs ("Six Feet of Chain"), railroad songs ("The Railroad"), traveling songs ("Long Black Train"), and cold-hearted love songs ("Look at That Woman") peppered with outlaws, itinerants, dead-end women, card players, and beat-down heroes, too. Between the songs, Hazlewood shows his storyteller's gift by offering up bits of narration, and the album itself is a storyteller's record. Trouble is like a cross between a novel full of idiosyncratic character studies (à la Faulkner) and a John Wayne Western, with Hazlewood -- looking a lot like a dharma bum on the album cover, sitting on the railroad tracks with his guitar and a dangling cigarette -- spinning out intricate yarns about all manner of interesting souls with names like Orville Dobkins and Emory Zickfoose Brown, all residents of the hard-scrabbled fictitious town Trouble ("nothing with a railroad running through it"), which is loosely based on his birthplace. The music is as somber and loping as such subject matter demands, mostly consisting of strummed acoustic guitars and woeful harmonica wails that weep the blues. But it is in the purposefully humorous, sympathetic, and colorful storytelling that the distinct, dead-on Americana heart of Trouble lays.

Read More

Product Details

Release Date:
03/19/2013
Label:
Light In The Attic
UPC:
0826853009621
catalogNumber:
96
Rank:
39606

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Long Black Train
  2. Ugly Brown
  3. Son of a Gun
  4. We All Make the Flowers Grow
  5. Run Boy Run
  6. Six Feet of Chain
  7. The Railroad
  8. Look At That Woman
  9. Peculiar Guy
  10. Trouble is a Lonesome Town
  11. It's an Actuality
  12. I Guess It's Love
  13. Fort Worth
  14. Pretty Jane  - Mark Robinson
  15. Want Me  - Mark Robinson
  16. The Girl On Death Row
  17. Words Mean Nothing
  18. Can't Let Her See Me Cry  - Mark Robinson
  19. I've Made Enough Mistakes Today  - Mark Robinson
  20. Who Is Lee Hazlewood?
  21. Moved From Place of Birth
  22. Girl in High School
  23. In the Army
  24. Disc Jockey
  25. Record Biz

Read More

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Lee Hazlewood   Primary Artist,Vocals,Interviewee
Duane Eddy   Guitar
Casey   Guitar
Billy Strange   Guitar
Hal Blaine   Percussion,Drums
Billy Lee Riley   Guitar,Harmonica
Bert Dodson   Bass
Marshall Leib   Guitar

Technical Credits

Duane Eddy   Composer
Casey   Interviewer
Lee Hazlewood   Composer,Producer,Liner Notes
Jack Nitzsche   Arranger
Marty Cooper   Interviewer
Chuck Britz   Engineer
Jim Malloy   Engineer
Mark Pickerel   Images,Archival Materials
Jack Tracy   Liner Notes
Jimmy Dell   Interviewer
John Dixon   Images,Archival Materials
John P. Dixon   Liner Notes
Geoffrey Weiss   Images,Archival Materials
Matt Sullivan   Executive Producer
Josh Wright   Executive Producer
John Baldwin   Remastering
Ian Marshall   Images,Archival Materials
Jason Grant   Proof Reading
Hunter Lea   Images,Archival Materials
Barton Lee Hazlewood   Images,Archival Materials
Sill Hazlewood   Producer

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >