Trouble with Baby

Trouble with Baby

by Marisabina Russo
     
 

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Sam and Hannah know how to have fun together. But then Hannah gets a new doll named Baby.

Baby goes everywhere with Hannah. When they play school, Hannah calls on Baby, not Sam. When they play jukebox, Baby gets to sing before Sam.

Sam doesn't like Baby at all.

In this true-to-life story, a brother and sister find a creative way to deal with

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Overview

Sam and Hannah know how to have fun together. But then Hannah gets a new doll named Baby.

Baby goes everywhere with Hannah. When they play school, Hannah calls on Baby, not Sam. When they play jukebox, Baby gets to sing before Sam.

Sam doesn't like Baby at all.

In this true-to-life story, a brother and sister find a creative way to deal with jealousy. How can Sam, Hannah, and Baby all have fun together? The solution is simple and clever and surprising.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Sam and Hannah were good friends and played together all the time. They played school, made tents and sat with Daddy every night for a bedtime story. Sam was the only boy invited to Hannah's birthday party and he watched as she opened her presents. He was looking forward to playing with all the new toys, but one of Hannah's gifts was a baby doll Hannah loved so much she refused to allow Sam to touch it. Hannah named the doll Baby and carried it with her everywhere they went. Hannah seemed to like Baby more than she liked Sam and they no longer had fun playing together. Finally Sam was so jealous he stopped playing with Hannah. That's when Hannah realized that she missed playing with Sam; playing with Baby by herself was just boring. There didn't appear to be any way to make up until Sam got a teddy bear and Hannah, Sam, Baby and Teddy all played together. Children who liked the earlier stories about Hannah and Sam will probably enjoy this one as well. 2003, Greenwillow/HarperCollins,
— Carolyn Mott Ford <%ISBN%>0060089245
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-Hannah and her younger brother Sam enjoy one another's company. Then, for her birthday, Hannah receives a baby doll that she won't share and insists on including it in all of their activities. Sam gets annoyed, complains, and finally rebels, and Hannah slowly realizes that without him, their usual games are boring, lonely, and no fun at all. With just a little prodding, Sam, who's now joined by his teddy bear, forgives and forgets, and equilibrium is restored. The conflict and resolution is dealt with calmly and without judgment. While there is obvious parental support and concern, Russo allows the siblings to settle their differences. She also shapes the discussion by limiting the book's focus to the youngsters' creative play. The artist's signature-style illustrations- gouache paintings with a smooth application of color-are flat yet detailed scenes of everyday life. The art fleshes out the words in a simple, naturally flowing manner. Readers will be intrigued by this child-centered study of a typical problem.-Martha Topol, Traverse Area District Library, Traverse City, MI Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Hannah and Sam well-known from their earlier outings (The Big Brown Box, 2000; Hannah!, 2001, etc.) play everything together; at least until Hannah gets a new doll that she takes everywhere she goes. Instead of keeping Baby on her bed with all of her other dolls, Hannah places her on the table during meals and props her on the sink while brushing her teeth. Baby is even given her own chair when they all play school, offering better answers to Hannah's questions than Sam can provide. Their parents bring a large box home and Hannah and Sam decide to make a jukebox with cutouts to stick their heads through and buttons for their parents to press when they want to hear songs. Sam's patience with Hannah and her new toy hits its limit when Baby gets her own button and is allowed to sing her own song. His protests that Baby is only a doll make no difference to Hannah, who insists on giving Baby all her attention. Sam and Hannah refuse to talk to each other after the blow-up, but they soon realize that playing with toys is not as much fun as playing together. Simplistic artwork rendered in bright gouache illustrates the text. Not Russo at her simple best, this familiar family story rambles on and offers nothing new. (Picture book. 4-6)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060089252
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/14/2003
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.30(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 6 Years

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