Truckin' & Trailerin'

Truckin' & Trailerin'

by Gavin Ehringer
     
 

For today's horse owner, a truck and trailer are as essential as a saddle and bridle. A proper rig greatly expands a rider's horizons. Riding in the isolation of a home arena or on nearby trails gets old fast. Soon enough, the rider wants to venture out and enjoy riding, with other horse people. For that the horse person needs comfortable, reliable, and safe

Overview

For today's horse owner, a truck and trailer are as essential as a saddle and bridle. A proper rig greatly expands a rider's horizons. Riding in the isolation of a home arena or on nearby trails gets old fast. Soon enough, the rider wants to venture out and enjoy riding, with other horse people. For that the horse person needs comfortable, reliable, and safe transportation.

This booklet details how to find the right truck and trailer for the particular horse person's needs and budget. Also, it offers good advice on properly selecting, using, and maintaining the equipment. Much of the information is intended for the novice horse hauler, someone who hasn't spent a lot of time behind the wheel of a truck and horse trailer.

Divided into two sections, "The Rig" guides you through some basic knowledge: how to choose a tow vehicle, how to mate it with a trailer, and how to keep both on the road. Also covered are advantages of gas versus diesel engines, gearing, cooling, optional equipment, and different types of trailer-hitch designs. The second section, "On the Road Again and Again and Again," delves into the subjects of trailer loading, trailer handling, and over-the-road safety. Other topics include truck and trailer "lingo," equipment maintenance, and trailer storage.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780911647723
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
04/28/2004
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
36
Product dimensions:
7.70(w) x 10.40(h) x 0.20(d)

Read an Excerpt

Evaluate a trailer from the inside out. That means look at the construction first before you get carried away with the bells and whistles. It's a good idea to look at trailers from several manufacturers to get a feel for quality.

It's fair to say that there aren't any bad trailers on the market today. The trailer business is too competitive for inferior quality products, and no manufacturer wants a liability suit, so trailers are built sturdy and safe. But some trailers are miles ahead of others. The first place to spot quality is the frame.

Measure (or at least ask about) the distance between upright frame members. Standard spacing is 24 inches; 18 is better. The same goes for roof bows, which are the ribs that support the trailer ceiling. Inspect the inside of the trailer. Most trailer panels are attached to the frame using spot welds. Some manufacturers caulk the panels where they come into contact with the frame, which cuts down on noise and vibration. Welds should look smooth and even, an indication of quality craftsmanship.

Meet the Author

Gavin Ehringer is a free-lance writer from Colorado Springs, Colorado, whose work has appeared in many publications including Western Horseman for which he also writes a rodeo column, The Quarter Horse Journal, Horse & Rider, Paint Horse Journal, The Reiner, Cowboys & Indians, and American Cowboy. He's written sports articles for Encyclopedia Britannica and personality profiles for PEOPLE Weekly. Additionally, he's covered the winter ski and sports scene for the Rocky Mountain News in Denver and has written for numerous outdoor lifestyle magazines about skiing, rodeo, horses, adventure sports and travel. He also co-authored a book titled Rodeo in America.

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