Trudy

( 7 )

Overview

Trudy's parents are older than other kids' parents-Trudy's mom was fifty-three when Trudy was born. Now, as Trudy enters middle school, her parents are in their sixties and seventies. They are so old, in fact, that most people mistake them for her grandparents. As if that isn't complicated enough, Trudy's also having a hard time at school. Math class isn't going so well, and Ashley-who she pinky swore she would always be best friends with-has ditched her for a new crowd. Life at Benavidez Middle School is an ...
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Overview

Trudy's parents are older than other kids' parents-Trudy's mom was fifty-three when Trudy was born. Now, as Trudy enters middle school, her parents are in their sixties and seventies. They are so old, in fact, that most people mistake them for her grandparents. As if that isn't complicated enough, Trudy's also having a hard time at school. Math class isn't going so well, and Ashley-who she pinky swore she would always be best friends with-has ditched her for a new crowd. Life at Benavidez Middle School is an adjustment, and she misses the way her life used to be.

As the school year goes on, Trudy finds a new best friend-the straight-talking Roshanda-has her first serious crush on a boy, and gets used to life with lockers and class schedules. But just when things are getting better at school, Trudy and Ma notice that Pop is acting funny-he forgets to pick Trudy up from school and stants to put grooeries away in the bathroom. Soon, Trudy and her mother embark on a quest to find out what is wrong.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Trudy White's middle school career is not going particularly well. Her best friend has dumped her, her math grades stink, and everyone at school, including her teacher, thinks her parents are her grandparents because they are so old. Trudy's math teacher tells her that she is in danger of being put into a lower math class if she can't pull her grades up. Luckily, Trudy is befriended by Roshanda, nicknamed "Tower" because she is so tall. Roshanda is a math whiz and, in the course of tutoring Trudy, the two become fast friends. While things at school improve, Trudy's home life is changing. Her father, who is more than 70, begins to exhibit troubling signs of forgetfulness and is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. In a very short period of time, life changes dramatically for Trudy. Instead of being cared for by her father, she is the one who helps her mother care for him. By portraying Trudy's relationship with her aging and ill father, author Jessica Lee Anderson offers a tender and interesting twist on the traditional awkward-middle-school experience, and introduces middle readers to the concepts of aging and mortality in a sensitive and thoughtful way. 2005, Milkweed Editions, Ages 9 up.
—Lauri Berkenkamp
VOYA
Trudy's parents are not just old; they are ancient. They were fifty-three and sixty-two when they had Trudy, and as she enters middle school, her Ma and Pop are generally assumed to be her grandparents. As Trudy deals with the issues of adolescence-fitting in, making new friends, and figuring out algebra-she must face something her classmates will not soon experience in the gradual decline of a loved parent. Her best friend, Roshanda; an encouraging teacher; and her courageous mother support Trudy as she struggles with these challenges and as her comfortable family unit becomes irreversibly altered. This debut effort is the winner of the Milkweed Prize for Children's Literature and is a respectable effort as an Alzheimer's related story. Unlike others of the genre, it does not rely on dire circumstances to give weight to the story, nor does it read like a medical pamphlet. Trudy's Pop losing his passion for his beloved garden and forgetting who his only daughter is provides plenty of drama. Brief chapters provide insight into key moments but sometimes lack coherence and flow. Trudy's parents are thinly drawn and difficult to connect with. Female readers whose families are struggling with an Alzheimer's patient might gain comfort from the story, but others are unlikely to be enthusiastic. Barbara Park's The Graduation of Jake Moon (Atheneum/S & S, 2000) may be a better suggestion for boys. VOYA CODES: 2Q 2P M (Better editing or work by the author might have warranted a 3Q; For the YA with a special interest in the subject; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8). 2005, Milkweed Editions, 169p., and Trade pb. Ages 11 to 14.
—Catherine Gilmore-Clough
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-Trudy faces many challenges as she begins classes at Benavidez Middle School. She loses her best friend, discovers she is hopeless at math, and is embarrassed by the fact that everyone assumes her elderly parents are her grandparents. While struggling to overcome her loneliness and failing schoolwork, she is befriended by a classmate, and things begin to look brighter. At home, however, Trudy notices that her father repeats himself and gets confused. He even calls her by his sister's name. Then he is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. With the help of her sympathetic English teacher, Trudy sees that she can make the most of the situation as the family works hard to create memories. Ultimately, Trudy learns that she should focus on the things she can change rather than those that are beyond her control. This quiet story is well paced, flowing through very short chapters. It offers a matter-of-fact, yet unique look at one family's changing dynamics. Pair it with Barbara Park's The Graduation of Jake Moon (S & S, 2000) for another perspective on this theme.-Alison Grant, West Bloomfield Township Public Library, MI Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781571316592
  • Publisher: Milkweed Editions
  • Publication date: 9/9/2005
  • Series: Milkweed Prize for Children's Literature
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 169
  • Sales rank: 1,479,387
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.34 (w) x 7.98 (h) x 0.29 (d)

Table of Contents

Names Can Hurt You 3
Ms. Gwen's Mistake 4
The Famous Surprise 6
Dancing Lessons and Oatmeal 8
Clearing the Patio 11
Learning to Waltz 13
Conjectures and Tears 15
A Conference of Interest 17
Possibilities 20
Ashley, the Tutor 22
Tutoring 24
White Weekend Lie 26
Ma, the Could-Have-Been Veterinarian 28
Roshanda's Gift 30
Studying with Ro-Ro 32
Changes 34
Run-Ins 36
Images and Pains in the Chest 38
Walking the Dog 40
The Warm Cool Front 42
The Trouble with Fathers 44
The Green Hawthorn 46
Pop and Laura Bell 48
Heart Problems and Heartaches 50
An Invitation of Importance 52
A Tale of Two Princesses 54
The Moby Dick Letdown 56
Marked with a K 58
Assignments and Losses 60
Making the Most of It 62
On the Road 64
Making Small Talk 66
Passing Time 68
Looking Up in the Sky 70
"Dew Drops" and the Wonderful Earth 71
A Mountain and a Funeral 74
A Turkey and a Tornado 76
Ro-Ro's Happiness Shines 78
Cereal Boxes, a Can of Veggies, and Underwear 80
Old Timers 82
The Long Walk 84
Talking to Ms. Gwen 86
The Live Oak 88
Shopping News 90
Adding to Our Family 92
Christmas Prayers 94
Vienna Attire 95
A New Year's Eve Nightmare for Someone 97
Things Lighten Up 99
The Performance 101
Fireworks Full of Hope 103
An Unfortunate Break, but Not So Bad 105
A Movie Instead 107
Wrapping It Up 109
'Twas the Night Before School Started Again 111
The Things Pop Says 113
Cartoons and the Ring 115
Sleet, the Consolation Prize 117
Iced Over 119
Glad the Roads Were Bad 121
A Land Mine Story with Cereal 123
A Dinner Date 125
All Pitching In 127
Angel 129
New Hopes, Old Dreams 131
Flushing Out 134
The Last Straw for Ma 136
An Offer Declined 138
Apartment Hunting with Bows and Arrows 140
The Daunting Sign 142
The Waiting Game 144
Telling It Like It Is 146
Visiting Pop 148
A Time to Remember, or Forget 150
Sleeping and Breathing 152
I See You 154
Alfred John White 156
Home 158
Partial Homecoming 160
Help 162
Back to School 164
Transitions 166
A Flower for Me 168
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 7 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2006

    fabulous

    this book was great.i could really relate to trudy in this book and i recommend it to anyone,especially if you know anyone with dimensia/parkinson's etc.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2005

    Trudy

    When I began reading this book, I couldn't put it down until the end. It really is an award-winning book! The middle school aspect of it is just as I remember--trying hard to fit in, and then making friends with someone you never thought a likely choice. This is a story that both young and old alike will identify with.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2005

    great, touching story!

    Trudy is a poignant story told from the perspective of a precocious girl named Trudy. Like her classmates and her best friend Tower, Trudy experiences the turmoil of transitioning into a young adult. However, Trudy must also cope with her father¿s perplexing new behavior. Both heartwarming and heart wrenching, Trudy confronts the effects of Alzheimer¿s disease from a unique perspective ¿ through the eyes of a young girl. I recommend this book especially to anyone dealing with Alzheimer¿s disease.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2005

    Trudy

    This book was so different and I read it all in about 5 hours. It made me think of my grandparents. I want to know what happens after the last sentence.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2005

    Trudy

    This is a great family story with heart. Both young and old folks would get something out of reading it. My grandfather has Alzhiemer's and has alot in common with Pop.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2010

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    Posted August 2, 2010

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

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