True Blood and Philosophy: We Wanna Think Bad Things with You

Overview

The first look at the philosophical issues behind Charlaine Harris's New York Times bestsellers The Southern Vampire Mysteries and the True Blood television series

Teeming with complex, mythical characters in the shape of vampires, telepaths, shapeshifters, and the like, True Blood, the popular HBO series adapted from Charlaine Harris's bestselling The Southern Vampire Mysteries, has a rich collection of themes to explore, from sex and romance to bigotry and violence to death ...

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Overview

The first look at the philosophical issues behind Charlaine Harris's New York Times bestsellers The Southern Vampire Mysteries and the True Blood television series

Teeming with complex, mythical characters in the shape of vampires, telepaths, shapeshifters, and the like, True Blood, the popular HBO series adapted from Charlaine Harris's bestselling The Southern Vampire Mysteries, has a rich collection of themes to explore, from sex and romance to bigotry and violence to death and immortality. The goings-on in the mythical town of Bon Temps, Louisiana, where vampires satiate their blood lust and openly commingle with ordinary humans, present no shortages of juicy metaphysical morsels to sink your teeth into.

Now True Blood and Philosophy calls on the minds of some of history's great thinkers to perform some philosophical bloodletting on such topics as Sookie and the metaphysics of mindreading; Maryann and sacrificial religion; werewolves, shapeshifters and personal identity; vampire politics, evil, desire, and much more.

  • The first book to explore the philosophical issues and themes behind the True Blood novels and television series
  • Adds a new dimension to your understanding of True Blood characters and themes
  • The perfect companion to the start of the third season on HBO and the release of the second season on DVD

Smart and entertaining, True Blood and Philosophy provides food—or blood—for thought, and a fun, new way to look at the series.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Can John Locke's memory theory explain the nature of vampire identity? Is there a PETA message buried in True Blood's take on vampire-human relations? These and other biting issues constitute the smart and amusing essays in the latest William Irwin-edited Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series (after Mad Men and Philosophy). Authors invoke the likes of Kant, Sartre, and Freud and approach their topics with the seriousness of a devoted fan balanced with the levity and wit the series is known for. More than one essay focusing on God and vampires duplicate efforts, but highlights include Christopher Robichaud's examination of consent in creating a vampire, William M. Curtis's discussion of metaphor and the mainstreaming of blood suckers, Ron Hirschbein's exploration of the "Edible Complex," and Patricia Brace and Robert Arp's analysis of the not-so-subtle similarities between vampire rights and gay rights. These easily-digestible philosophical morsels are perfect for fans of Jon Stewart and anyone else who likes to laugh while they learn.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
From the Publisher

Can John Locke's memory theory explain the nature of vampire identity? Is there a PETA message buried in True Blood's take on vampire-human relations? These and other biting issues constitute the smart and amusing essays in the latest William Irwin-edited Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series (after Mad Men and Philosophy). Authors invoke the likes of Kant, Sartre, and Freud and approach their topics with the seriousness of a devoted fan balanced with the levity and wit the series is known for. More than one essay focusing on God and vampires duplicate efforts, but highlights include Christopher Robichaud's examination of consent in creating a vampire, William M. Curtis's discussion of metaphor and the mainstreaming of blood suckers, Ron Hirschbein's exploration of the "Edible Complex," and Patricia Brace and Robert Arp's analysis of the not-so-subtle similarities between vampire rights and gay rights. These easily-digestible philosophical morsels are perfect for fans of Jon Stewart and anyone else who likes to laugh while they learn. (June) (PW.com, August 16, 2010)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470597729
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 6/1/2010
  • Series: Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series , #27
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 938,367
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

GEORGE A. DUNN is a lecturer at the University of Indianapolis and Ningbo Institute of Technology, Zhejiang University, China. He contributed to Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy, X-Men and Philosophy, Terminator and Philosophy, Twilight and Philosophy, Alice in Wonderland and Philosophy, Iron Man and Philosophy, and Mad Men and Philosophy.

REBECCA HOUSEL, a former professor of writing and popular culture, is now an author and editor serving on editorial advisory boards for the Journal of Popular Culture and the Journal of American Culture. She coedited Twilight and Philosophy and X-Men and Philosophy.

WILLIAM IRWIN is a professor of philosophy at King's College. He originated the philosophy and popular culture genre of books as coeditor of the bestselling The Simpsons and Philosophy and has overseen recent titles, including Batman and Philosophy, House and Philosophy, and Alice in Wonderland and Philosophy.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments: For the "Super" We Just Can't Live Without ix

Introduction: "If a Tree Falls in the Woods, It's Still a Tree-Ain't It?" 1

Part 1 "I Used to Hate Vampires, Until I Got to Know One": Vampire-Human Ethics

1 To Turn or Not to Turn: The Ethics of Making Vampires Christopher Robichaud 7

2 Dressing Up and Playing Human: Vampire Assimilation in the Human Playground Jennifer Culver 19

3 Pets, Cattle, and Higher Life Forms on True Blood Ariadne Blayde George A. Dunn 33

Part 2 "Life-Challenged Individuals": The Politics of Being Dead

4 Signed in Blood: Rights and the Vampire-Human Social Contract Joseph J. Foy 51

5 "Honey, If We Can't Kill People, What's the Point of Being a Vampire?": Can Vampires Be Good Citizens? William M. Curtis 65

6 Un-True Blood: The Politics of Artificiality Bruce A. McClelland 79

Part 3 "Their Very Blood is Seductive": Eros, Sexuality, and Gender

7 Coming Out of the Coffin and Coming Out of the Closet Patricia Brace Robert Arp 93

8 "I Am Sookie, Hear Me Roar!": Sookie Stackhouse and Feminist Ambivalence Lillian E. Craton Kathryn E. Jonell 109

9 Sookie, Sigmund, and the Edible Complex Ron Hirschbein 123

Part 4 "I Am Actually Older than Your Jesus": Natural, Supernatural, and Divine

10 Let the Bon Temps Roll: Sacrifice, Scapegoats, and Good Times Kevin J. Corn George A. Dunn 139

11 Are Vampires Unnatural? Andrew Terjesen Jenny Terjesen 157

12 Does God Hate Fangs? Adam Barkman 175

Part 5 "Our Existence is Insanity": The Metaphysics of Supernatural Beings

13 A Vampire's Heart Has Its Reasons That Scientific Naturalism Can't Understand Susan Peppers-Bates Joshua Rust 187

14 Keeping Secrets from Sookie Fred Curry 203

15 Vampires, Werewolves, and Shapeshifters: The More They Change, the More They Stay the Same Sarah Grubb 215

Contributors: "I Don't Know Who You Think You Are, but Before the Night Is Through . . ." 229

Index: Sookie's Words of the Day 237

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 4, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Bridget's Review

    I have been fascinated with vampires, werewolves and witches since for as long as I can remember. It used to be that vampires were repulsing creatures who felt no remorse and had no soul. In today's world, becoming a vampire is a romantic notion. I have often wondered why this idea appealed to me and even though I can't quite put my finger on the how or why that I like it, all I know is I've been seduced by the thought of being a supernatural creature.

    I have always thought that the big reason we like vampires is the same reason that we would choose the "bad boy" instead of a good one. We are attracted to the idea that we can change someone and we're interested in finding out if someone can change us. Little did I know that there are a lot of reasons that I had never thought of.

    This book dives into questions such as "does God hate fangs" and "are all vampires created equal". This was a fun and interesting read. Fans of True Blood don't want to miss this!

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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