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True Food: Seasonal, Sustainable, Simple, Pure

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Overview

The #1 bestseller that presents seasonal, sustainable, and delicious recipes from Dr. Andrew Weil's popular True Food Kitchen restaurants.

When Andrew Weil and Sam Fox opened True Food Kitchen, they did so with a two-fold mission: every dish served must not only be delicious but must also promote the diner's well-being. TRUE FOOD supports this mission with freshly imagined recipes that are both inviting and ...

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Overview

The #1 bestseller that presents seasonal, sustainable, and delicious recipes from Dr. Andrew Weil's popular True Food Kitchen restaurants.

When Andrew Weil and Sam Fox opened True Food Kitchen, they did so with a two-fold mission: every dish served must not only be delicious but must also promote the diner's well-being. TRUE FOOD supports this mission with freshly imagined recipes that are both inviting and easy to make.

Showcasing fresh, high-quality ingredients and simple preparations with robust, satisfying flavors, the book includes more than 125 original recipes from Dr. Weil and chef Michael Stebner, including Spring Salad with Aged Provolone, Curried Cauliflower Soup, Corn-Ricotta Ravioli, Spicy Shrimp and Asian Noodles, Bison Umami Burgers, Chocolate Icebox Tart, and Pomegranate Martini.

Peppered throughout are essays on topics ranging from farmer's markets to proper proportions to the benefits of an anti-inflammatory diet. TRUE FOOD offers home cooks of all levels the chance to transform meals into satisfying, wholesome fare.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Dr. Andrew Weil (Spontaneous Happiness; The Healthy Kitchen) and Sam Fox launched their True Food Kitchen in California and Arizona to spotlight the bestselling author's anti-inflammatory diet philosophy. This cookbook takes that message national with 125 original recipes created by Dr. Weil and chef Michael Stenber. The recipes featured include Cheese Ravioli and Vegetable with Parmesan Broth, Spaghetti Squash Casserole, Spicy Shrimp and Asian Noodles, and Chocolate Icebox Tart.

Publishers Weekly
For those who believe that “health food” will never be as satisfying as gourmet food laden with cream, butter, sugar, and salt, holistic wellness pioneer Weil (Spontaneous Happiness), restaurateur Fox, and chef Stebner have created a chain of eateries, True Food Kitchen, to prove them wrong. This title gathers more than 125 recipes from Weil’s personal collection and others he developed with Stebner, the chain’s executive chef, that conform to Weil’s Anti-inflammatory Diet Food Pyramid—diners at True Food Kitchen are handed a copy before they peruse the menu—and incorporate cooking methods and ingredients from Mediterranean and traditional Asian cuisines. There are many options for vegetarians of all stripes, low-carb and low-fat eaters, paleo dieters, and the gluten-sensitive, and discussions of healthy eating practices (seasonal produce, portion sizes, whole grains, etc.). An entertaining chat between the authors gives insight into the difficulty of making unfamiliar items like sea buckthorn juice (better known as a component in natural beauty products but used here in sorbet, a muffin glaze, and drinks), sambal oelek (a spicy chile paste), and astragalus root (a Chinese medicinal herb) palatable to mainstream Americans, while adapting to popular demands for red meat, coffee, and alcohol. Ethnically inspired choices include breakfast tabbouleh with kiwi, strawberry, and lime juice; Gado-Gado, an Indonesian salad dressed with peanut sauce; a soup made with immunity-boosting astragalus root, garlic, and shiitake mushrooms; and salmon sauced with a kasu paste derived from sake. The brief dessert section reflects Weil’s philosophy that Americans consume too many sweets; but on special occasions, readers can indulge without guilt in a nondairy Middle Eastern pistachio confection or a vegan, gluten-free chocolate pudding. Agent: Richard Pine. (Oct.)
Marion Nestle
"Andrew Weil is a rare member of a special class of diet gurus: he appreciates good food. This shows in his philosophy of healthy eating-if meals are delicious, people will eat them. It also shows in every recipe in this book. Weil and his colleagues encourage adventurous eating and some of the ingredients may be unfamiliar, but even the simplest recipe-tomato and watermelon salad, for example-will make mouths water."
Alice Waters
"Andrew Weil knows how to bring people into a new relationship to food: If you eat simply and deliciously with family and friends, using local, organic ingredients in season, the natural outcome will be good health for the rest of your life."
From the Publisher
"Andrew Weil is a rare member of a special class of diet gurus: he appreciates good food. This shows in his philosophy of healthy eating-if meals are delicious, people will eat them. It also shows in every recipe in this book. Weil and his colleagues encourage adventurous eating and some of the ingredients may be unfamiliar, but even the simplest recipe-tomato and watermelon salad, for example-will make mouths water."—Marion Nestle, professor of nutrition, food studies, and public health at New York University, and coauthor of Why Calories Count

"Andrew Weil knows how to bring people into a new relationship to food: If you eat simply and deliciously with family and friends, using local, organic ingredients in season, the natural outcome will be good health for the rest of your life."—Alice Waters, author of The Art of Simple Food

"No one may be more associated with an anti-inflammatory diet than integrative medicine guru Dr. Andrew Weil, creator of the Anti-Inflammatory Diet." —Dallas Morning News

Library Journal
The high-profile promoter of both our mental and our physical well-being, Weil opened True Food Kitchen in 2008 with Fox, three-time James Beard Restaurateur of the Year nominee. The aim? Really tasty food that also assures our well-being. With over 125 recipes—personally, I'm down with the Corn and Ricotta Cheese Ravioli and the Pomegranate Martini (and I don't even drink martinis).
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316129404
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
  • Publication date: 4/1/2014
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 264
  • Sales rank: 39,830
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew Weil, MD, is the founder and director of the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine and a partner of True Food Kitchen. He is the author of several bestselling books, including Spontaneous Happiness, The Healthy Kitchen (coauthored with Rosie Daley), Healthy Aging, 8 Weeks to Optimum Health, and Spontaneous Healing. He lives in Tucson, AZ.

Sam Fox is the founder and CEO of Fox Restaurant Concepts, and has been nominated three times for Restaurateur of the Year by the James Beard Foundation. He lives in Scottsdale, AZ.

Michael Stebner is the executive chef overseeing all True Food Kitchen restaurants. He lives in Scottsdale, AZ.

Biography

Since the early ‘70s, Andrew Weil has been bucking conventional wisdom about healthy living.

Weil began his career with a bang -- or maybe just a puff -- in The Natural Mind, a book containing ideas that remain controversial today. Most famously, it endorsed the idea of "stoned thinking" (induced not only by drugs but also by hypnosis, meditation, etc.) and identified a bias in traditional studies about mind-altering drugs. The book was fortified by Weil's own experience studying and taking various psychotropic agents, and while it suggested that non-chemical experiences were healthier, it also bore open criticism of American drug policy. Weil continued his exploration of altered mental states with The Marriage of the Sun and Moon and From Chocolate to Morphine (coauthored with Winifred Rosen).

In his next three titles -- Health and Healing, Natural Health, Natural Medicine, and Spontaneous Healing -- Weil turned to illness and alternative therapies, educating readers on then relatively unknown options such as homeopathy, herbal medicine, cranial therapy and other unconventional approaches. The fact that Weil was a Harvard-trained doctor lent his writings credibility and popularity with an ever-widening readership, even as he earned a somewhat heretical status in the world of mainstream medicine.

Some of Weil's views might rile practitioners of traditional medicine -- he has suggested that certain conventional treatments do more harm than good -- but Weil has never advocated abandonment of the medical establishment. Rather, he promotes integrative medicine: an approach to health that embraces nontraditional healing methods and takes the mind and spirit into account when assessing and treating problems. In response to Dr. Arthur Relman's assault in the New Republic, charging that assertions in Weil's books that lacked scientific backing, Weil responded on his web site, "If I had dismissed the successes I saw with [cranial therapy, for example] as ‘anecdotes,' we would not be in a position to take the next step and gather the data that Dr. Relman wants to see. It is important to note that paradigm shifts, in medicine as in other fields, are not quiet affairs. They occasion much screaming and kicking." (To both of the doctors' credits, they engaged in a public debate at the University of Arizona following Relman's much-discussed critique, minus the screaming and kicking.) Whatever the future holds for certain alternative approaches, it is a testament both to Weil's popularity and the growing interest in his ideas that studies of such practices have begun to win funding and attention.

Eight Weeks to Optimum Health was the most complete synthesis yet of Weil's ideas about holistic health and also helped cement his status as a health guru. Unlike most "diets" that focused mostly on meal plans and magical eating formulas, Weil's program is about a balance of nutrients, herbs, exercise, and mental salves such as turning off the news or keeping fresh flowers around. In particular, Weil became a well known expert on the growing field of herbal supplements.

Recently, Weil teamed with Rosie Daley -- Oprah's former personal chef – to create The Healthy Kitchen. The book operates on a bit of push-and-pull between Daley and Weil, with "Andy" offering substitute ingredients to some of Rosie's recipes. As with Weil's other tomes, The Healthy Kitchen does not operate on draconian edicts, offering options for individuals instead.

Good To Know

Weil is director and founder of the Program in Integrative Medicine of the College of Medicine, University of Arizona. Also, his Polaris Foundation advances the cause of integrative medicine through public policy, education, and research.

Weil's parents owned a millinery store in Philadelphia, and his mother fostered his interest in botany. "When you grow up in a row house, there's very limited opportunity to grow stuff, but my mother knew some things from her mother, who was the one with the real green thumb," he told My Generation magazine. "And she did introduce me to growing bulbs in the house, and we had a little plot of ground to garden. That stuff fascinated me. And I always dreamed about the day when I could have enough space to do it."

Weil's undergraduate focus was ethnobotany, which focuses on the uses of certain plants by various cultures and ethnicities. His thesis title: "The Use of Nutmeg as a Psychotropic Agent." Under a fellowship from the Institute of Current World Affairs, Weil traveled from 1971-75 throughout Central and South America to investigate cultural psychotropics and healing. Many of his findings from this time are collected in The Marriage of the Sun and Moon.

Weil lives in Arizona "by pure chance," he told HealthWorld Online. His car broke down in the mid-1970s, and it took so long to fix that he ended up staying in Tucson.

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      Tucson, Arizona
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 8, 1942
    2. Place of Birth:
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    1. Education:
      B.A. in Biology, Harvard University, 1964; M.D., Harvard Medical School, 1968
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 13 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 19, 2012

    Love this cookbook!

    We ate at True Food Kitchen in Sedona and bought the cookbook to make these foods at home. So far every recipe we've used is great, and the book is beautiful, too!

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    Gave it as a Xmas gift to a friend that is into organic food. They loved it. Started flipping through the book amazed with all the recipes they wanted to try.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2013

    I made the sweet potato and poblano chile soup and it was dreadf

    I made the sweet potato and poblano chile soup and it was dreadful! I followed the recipe exactly but it was soo watery that I spent the next hour trying to fix it. The proportions of liquid to veggies is very far off. Sure, the pictures look nice, but I now have my doubts. Also, there's so much meat in these recipes that there isn't a lot for a vegetarian to make.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2012

    Nice recipes

    Clean good tasting and healthy

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2013

    I enjoyed this book and support the idea, but it requires ingred

    I enjoyed this book and support the idea, but it requires ingredients that are not easy for me to find. I am disabled and cannot travel all over the city of Chicago to find the proper ingredients.  Also, I have an illness that does not allow me to eat tomatoes due to the acid content , plus I cannot eat any spices that can create heat. I will need to make several substitutions in order to use this book and I am not sure what would be appropriate.  So, even though everything sounded really good, I am feeling  a little lost in how to use it. 

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2013

    it wont download to my nook hd

    Grrrrrr....

    1 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted November 27, 2012

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